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Full text of "Beachcomber"


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THE STUDENT VOICE OF PBCC 



Volume 54 Number 4 



PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE ♦ LAKE WORTH, FLORIDA 



September 29, 1993 



Curtain Ms on the final act of Art 

Musto's too short yet fflustrious ; • 
career: PBCC is In mourning; • 



By MARK BRVNSKLL 
News Editor 

PBCC suffered a great loss when 
theatre professor Art Musto passed 
away Sept. 18 at the age of fifty. He 
had been fighting stomach cancer 
since December. 

Musto was known for his pas- 
sion for teaching and his immense 
contribution to the interior design of 
the Watson B. Duncan theatre. He 
also is remembered for his mild- 
mannered, charming personality. It 
was that love of teaching and strong 
character that left an impression on 
many students. 

"He was a great guy to work with. 
He really knew his stuff," noted Jim 
Kuskerman, a drama student at 
PBCC. "He always was smiling and 
enjoying his work." 

Musto began teaching at PBCC 
in 1967. He was hired as a stagecraft 
and speech instructor, in addition 
to directing the college players. 
Though only 25, Musto had formi- 
dable experience in almost every 
aspect imaginable of the theatre 
trade. At 18, he was the youngest 
summer theatre director /producer 
in the country. Just out of high 
school, Musto had the responsibil- 
ity of running a business, doing 



public relations and directing j-feys. 
He also performed in over forty plays 
and musicals during his college 
years. Musto's undergraduate work 
was done at the highly prestigious 
Carnegie-Mellon Institute, and his 
graduate work was completed at the 
University of Conneticut. 

During his 25 year tenure at 
PBCC, Musto kept himself immersed 
in projects. He was in charge of all 
technical aspects of campus plays. 
He also taught acting classes, and 
he appeared in many T.V. , magazine 
and print commercials. He also 
designed a private commercial work- 
shop to help acting students land 
jobs in the marketplace. 

When Dr. Eissey first decided to 
build a theatre at PBCC his first 
contact was Musto. 

"I called Ail and asked him for 
some advice since he knew a lot 
more about the subject (theatre) than 
I did, " Eissey related at the memorial 
service. "I told him to go ahead and 
make some plans over the next 
month. The very next day Art came 
to my office with a list." 

Much of the design of the Wat- 
son B. Duncan III theatre is Musto's 
contribution. He did much to give 
the theatre an intimate, comfortable 




Art Musto and former PBCC student and friend Burt Reynolds. 



atmosphere for both the audience 
and the performers. 

Musto stopped working last 
December when he realized the ex- 
tent of his illness. Frank Eberling, a 
fellow drama instructor, said that 
leaving teaching was the hardest 
thing for Musto to come to grips 



with. 

A memorial service was held on 
Wednesday, Sept. 23, in the theatre 
he had put so much of his life t. work 
into, and in the lobby of the Waston 
B Duncan theatre, is a display of 
pictures honoring Professor Musto 
and his copious career. 



How to play it safe on college campuses 



"Eighty percent of all crime on cam- 
puses Is committed by students against 
other students/' said Dorothy Siegel, 
executive director of the Campus Vio- 
lence Prevention Center. 



ByDIANASMTTH 
Special Correspondent 
College Press Service 

You're finally free. This is college — the big time, 
oratleastthe bigger time. There'sno Mom to lookover 
your shoulder, noDadtotellyouwhento comehome. 

And all of those lovely 

boundaries are waiting 
to be tested to the limit. 

If that's what you're 
thinking, nationalsafety 
experts say you're prob- 
ably well on your way to 
becoming a crime sta- 
tistic, whether it's as 
simple as having your 
math book stolen or as 
serious as date rape. 

"A lot of students come to college with a mind-set 
that there isn't crime on campus. They're looking at 
it like it's an idyllic sanctuary," said Bill Whitman, 
executive director of the Campus Safety and Security 
Institute near Philadelphia, an independent group 
that conducts research and seminars on campus 
crime. "Studentsneedtorealizethattherearepeople 
living right there in the residence hall who are going 
to take advantage of them." 

The collegiate environment can be intoxicating 
in the freedom that it allows, but safety experts like 
Whitman are spreading the word you can't depend 
entirely on dorm staff or campus police to keep you 
and your personal property safe. 

Tofindouthowsawyyouareaboutpersonaland 
property safety, take the following short quiz. The 
answers are at the end of the story. You might just 
learn something that will save your life — or at least 
your CD player. 

1 . A worldly student youknowyour way around. 
It's Fridaynight, time to party, andyou'regoingtorun 
down the hall to the shower and be back to the room 
in 10 minutes. Your roommate is there listening to 
music with his headphones. You: 



a) Take your towel and key, locking the door 
behind you. 

b) Take your towel. Your roommate can keep an 
eye on things. 

c) Hide your wallet before you leave. YouVe 
known your roommate for two years, and he's defi- 
nitely a thief and a pervert. 

2. You're at the caf- 
eteria, eatingalone, and 
youVe got a class in a 
few minutes. You've 
just slurped down the 
last of that delicious 
mystery punch, and 
you'd like a refill, al- 
though you can't say 
why. You: 

a) Take your wallet 
and saunter up to the self-serve fountain, showyour 
rneal card to the cashier and return to your seat 15 
feet away. No sweat. 

b) Take your books with you and get arefill on the 

way out, 

c) See a stranger trolling the tables and ask the 
nice, although somewhat shifty-eyed fellow to keep 
an eye on your health science books, which cost at 
least a couple of hundred bucks. 

3. You're in a bar with some friends on Saturday 
night. You and thathunka-himkaburninglove have 
been talking passionately about existentialism for 
two hours. Someone has to make a move, or you'll 
both explode. You: 

a) Tell your friends goodbye and ride off on his 
motorcycle for a night of adventure and romance. 

b) Invite him back to your room or apartment. 
You're sure your roommate won't mind an overnight 
visitor. 

c) Exchange telephone numbers, and ask some- 
one to hose you down with cold water. 

Some people may think the talk about campus 
crime is just media hype, but there's good reason for 
concern. Recent studies indicate there is more crime 
oh college campuses than administrators would care 



to admit. Most is property crime — thefts of stereo 
equipment, books and such — but violent crime also 
is on the rise. 

A 1990 study by the Campus Violence Preven- 
tion Center at Towson State University in Towson, 
Md., indicated significant increases in crimes such 
as sexual assault, arson, hate crimes, physical as- 
sault and vandalism, while murders and strong-arm 
robberies remained fairly constant from the previous 
school year. The report tallied responses from 437 
institutions in the United States and Canada. 

One disturbing result was that 42 percent of the 
colleges and universities admitted that crime statis- 
tics were not made available to parents and students . 
These findings were serious enough that Congress in 
1992 mandated that U.S.institutions publish crime 
statistics every year. 

The best way to play it safe, both on and off 
campus, is to remember a few key statistics. 

First, alcohol, drugs or a combination of both 
play a significant factor in about 75 percent of crime 
on campus, ranging from thefts, to fights, to rapes, 
Whitman said. University administrators and staff 
privately say the figure is closer to 90 percent. 

"The more they drink, the higher the correlation 
to crime," Whitman said. "The reality is, you know 
they're going to drink, and you have to manage the 
risk." 

But, he says, 'When you go out with the con- 
scious intent of getting wasted, the higher the risk." 

Second, 80 percent of all crime on campuses is 
committed by students against other students, said 
Dorothy Siegel, executive director of the Campus 
Violence Prevention Center. Most campus crime is 
committed by students, although many times the 
most violent crimes, such as murders, rapes and 
shootings, are committed by non-students. Fresh- 
men and sophomores tend to be the most likely 
victims because they're less experienced in coping 
with crime. 

Here are a few safety rules that Siegel and 



Please see CRIME/ 
page 6 



Page 2 



BEACHCOMBER 



September 29, 1993 



September 15, 1993 



BEACHCOMBER 



Page 3 



BEACHCOMBER 



Double-talk continues from Washington 



By MIKE MTTSEFF 
Editor 

It would appear that the present 
adirnnistration'sanswertothisratioris 
enormous debt and out-of-control 
health care industry, is to tax, tax, and 
taxsomemore. President Hil-Clinton's 
latest fiasco, universal health care {his 
first is well documented), will surety- 
bankrupt us; unfortunately, just the 
weight of our present liability, will be 
enough, in not too many years to 
totally bankrupt us.JWbVgjvheji fiscal 
responsibility ' • mm ****™-™ m --— 
(ie. STOP defi- 
cit spending) is 
called for, do 
politicians look 
us straight in 
our collective 
eye'sandtellus 
that what is 
needed is more 
government, 
more taxes, 
more of their 
"leadership"— and westare back, as if 
hypnotized and believe everything we 
are told!? If this health care "plan" 
becomes reality, then I am afraid that 
we'll never get government off of our 
backs, or ever get out of debt. 

The 'Health Care Plan' (anything 
administered by the government, has, 
so far, driven us deeper into debt) that 
Mr. and Mrs. Presidente' propose 
sounds too^ood to be true, perhaps 
because it is. President Clinton, as we 
all know, id %. chronic people-pleaser, 
he tries to be allthingsto allpeople and 
satisfies no one. A failure as a states- 
man, the Prez moves from one public 
relation ploy to another, seeking the 
formula that will gamer the plaudits 
he so, obviously, craves. 

Many people need help with man- 
aging their health care costs, certainly, 
but our country should not rush into 
anything as complex as a new layer of 
bureaucracy that will further enable 
blatant waste and the cheats and 
scoundrels - read: doctors and medi- 
cal supply companies - to continue 
their rape of the American taxpayer. 
These thieves take advantage of the 
Medicare/Medicaid system to the tune 
of many billions of dollars annually. 

So, Mr. Prez, just how can more 
taxes coupled with more bureaucrats 
be of any advantage to American citi- 
zens? 




Granted, neither the Republicans 
nor Democrats have done much to 
help us out of the economic hole they 
have gleefully dug for us, but if this 
adrninistration does not do something 
drastic to stop the hemorrhaging of 
our economy, thenrmafraidwell allbe 
working for fifty cents a day, right here 
in the good of US of A, and soon. We 
absolutely cannot continue to spend 
moremoneythanwetakein; itcouldn't 
be any simpler or uncomplicated than 
jSSLggjJdjt? If, as a nation, we do not 
address the 
debt and take 
action to re- 
duce it NOW; 
if we listen to 
the voices that 
tell us that all 
we need is 
more 
buraucracy 
and more 
taxes — busi- 
ness-as-usual 
politicians — then get ready for chaos. 
The greed exhibited the last two 
decades by 'BigBusiness' should warn 
us that our jobs are nothing more to 
some of these "entrepreneurs" than 
expendable, liquid assets, sacrificed 
for the good of their bottom line — for 
they cannot and will not resist the 
aroma of a quick buck at our expense. 
Thepaymentonjustthe interest of 
our national debt costs us as a nation 
almost half of every dime in taxes 
collected by our "benevolent" politi- 
cians, and by the turn of the century, 
if not before, the percentage of taxes 
collected to pay only the interest on the 
debt will reach 100 percent One hun- 
dred percent!! Our government's bud- 
get has yet to touch the principal of the 
debt, we are just paying the interest! 
I know, certainly, as do you, that if 
you or I were to handle our budgets as 
does Washington, we would be read- 
ingthis editorial from behind cold, iron 
bars. And another thing, why are the 
very "journalists" who are supposed to 
ask tough questions of the nation's 
lawmakers now seemingly in bed with 
them instead? 

View any news program for any- 
thing approaching objective reporting, 
on any subject related to the Clinton 
presidency, and you will not find it. The 
'talking heads' have become just that, 
parrots who have sold out for peanuts. 



"I U 3 & '3 H M 2 S 1 ' 
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TIME IS RUNNING OUT! 



Candidates for president of 



4^ _ fyv Student Government need to pick 

£ ■ v 

<* ) h Lounge from Esther Stewart. 



up an election packet in the SAC 



ASSOCIATION 



Deadline to register is 



November 1, and elections will be 



held November 16-24. 



BEACHCOMBER 



jEditor-in-Chief 
fNews Editor 
reports Editor 
|Entertainment Editor 
features Editor 
photography Editor 
^Advertising Manager 






,f\PBCC 



Mike Mitseff ) 
Mark Brunskill ; 
Justin KnapI'eS 
Jason Wllkcson 
Chris Hairis 
Robert Gerard : 
Betsy Fountain 



Staff Reporters 

D.S. Ullery, Molly Grabill, Dave Montalbano, Irene Barrett, 
Matt Swig, Peter Fellows, Mae Nielander, Dave McDermott, 
Chad Kirk and Maryellen McClung. 

Opinions expressed in the Beachcomber do not necessarily reflect 

the opinions of the Beachcomber or Palm Beach Community College. 

Letters to the Editor must be signed, and if requested names will be witheld. 

Palm Beach Community College 

BEACHCOMBER 

4200 Congress Avenue 

Lake Worth, FL 33461-4796 

(407) 439-8064 Fax (407) 439-8210 



3r. Edward Eissey 
"resident/Publisher 



Ms. Vicki Scheurer 
Faculty Advisor 



College in the nineties: Gainesville 
murders haunt transferring juniors 

By ROBERT G. GERARD 
Photo Editor 

ADtTl^flL b r^;; S0 ^ ed J? 0dy ° f Gina Marie ten&Mn lay motionless in 
Florida ™,?^ r ^^^ complex five miles from the University of 
a Sked rtKJ m TT1 Games ^ lle - He * roommate, Jena Hull, also brutally 
£?S UF femI?;SS ged k CT f Wl ° UtSide &S P0lice ^d; she remains 
aWit Indeed theS V** °,T & Galnesville " ri PP^" and live to tell 
about it. Indeed, the state of social deterioration in the environs of the UF 
is far more advanced than Vice President of Student AfXS Art SarSeen 
states when he says, "students understand (they) Uve in^oinSex^cSv 
and realize problems are everywhere." complex society 

Accused of the 1990 mutilation murders nf fW ^„- -n r 
students, Danny Rollins symbolizes m^odem dav - iS'f ^^ 
this latest assault, is free from the rnutiSuon^r,H e ^ ^ ^PP^ y et 
previous attacks. mutilation and sexual overtones of the 

As a transfer location, the University of Florida i<= a ~~ n 
for those students with an AA degree .from « ™ po P ular university 
appealing is the weather, while colder than South SS^' ^ S ° 
the northern states, and Florida subsidizes credit-hour fee. f Imlde ^ than 
that alone, makes it appealing to cash-strapped parents residents, 

But now for the transferring student, especially female sen™ 
hons about the apparent targeting of off-campus resSences^T qu ,1 a " 
decision to attend school in Gainesville a fifty- fifty sol? 2S ? lakes Ule 
^ey'dnowietmeirkidsgouneqmvocaUysa^ asked «*" 

daughter going to the U of F." ^owayismymoneyandmy 

Thettae-honoredinstitutioninGaines^emaynotexDeriern^ **, 
exodus of students as in the case of the 1990 murder* T™ enence ^e great 

to. but more students own hancJ^aK?SSuS^ T** ^ 
beginning with those that have four legs 5 sham fJZ ^ ty systems 

elabomtedectronicsurvefflance.AUfacftJiTLS ** more 

longerstartsafterblissful college days because d^^ Stress no 
now, and reflects the social brLJiS^^S^S^^' ^ ht 
only hope signs of the times aren't mscribe^rrSrhTe for fi I Y ' We Can 
events anywhere in our country, especially GaiiSte C cam P Us 

We mourn the loss of Gina Maria LanwUi ™ c«+ j 
1993. At press time, a male suspSisSf^SS^' Se P tember ™. 
in the apartment has been charged with TTdSl /° Und on the wall 
degree murder. But is his apprchl^SSJSSo^S ^ mpted first ~ 
awaits jurisprudence in the same system that has D^™ p" ^ tra S^Y as he 
in time, not tried or convicted, much lite "Jacl tn?? ^ Sus P ended 
knifeblade still invisibly stained with innocent bk£f W ^^ Ms 



V 




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Y'j 



BEACHCOMBER 



PBCC Hayers 6 stage' a picnic in the park at nearby John Prince Park 

By MIKE MTTSEFF 
Editor 

PBCC Players/Drama Club (Central 
Campus) combined pleasure with busi- 
ness during a picnic last Sunday after- 
noon at John Prince Park, adjacent to the 
college. 

Club advisor Mrs. Sunny Meyer and 
the club's officers 'staged' a cookout in the 
park. The late-afternoon food and fun get- 
together, amid the lush vegetation of the 
park, was soon turned to the purpose of 
swearing-in club members. (The hot dogs 
weren't bad either). 

Nearly thirty, starry-eyed and enthu- 
siastic future Thespian's joined the club, 
and judging by their response to the 
ceremony, their ensuing artistic endeav- 
ors soon to be undertaken in '93- '94 
should, at least, be quite good. 

Club president, Charlene Cowan said 
that the Players' have several projects in 
the works for this year and next. "We're 
presenting the Drama Fest again in Feb- 
ruary at the Duncan Theatre around 
Valentine's day, and April 10-16 we're 
performing a childrens production titled, 
'Stone Soup.' " 

PBCC Players vice president Zac Phillips was busy flipping burgers and charcoaling hot dogs, while second-yeai 
club member Paula McLeod, secretary and treasurer, made sure that everything ran smoothly. 

The first PBCC Players production, 'Look Homeward Angel,' written by Thomas Wolfe and directed by Frank 
Leahy (PBCC drama department instructor) will be performed on two successive weekends: Friday and Saturday 
Nov. 5, 6, at 8 p.m. and Sunday Nov. 7, at 2 p.m. — and the same times on the following weekend. 

Prices are $8, $10 and $12 dollars, a free student preview will be announced. 




From L--R, Mrs. Sunny Meyer, Zac Phillips, Paula McLeod and 
Charlene Cowan. 



SIU elects officers 



MARK BRUNSKILL 
iVetos Editor 

Students for International Understanding club (SIU) 
held its elections on September 22. 

The presidential race came first. Rohini Uppal, native of 
New Delhi, India, won for the second year in a row. She ran 
on experience and stressed the potential of the SIU. 

"I will do everything in my power to make SIU the best 
club on campus," Uppal promised. 

Her contender was Brazilian, Elizabeth Weiss, who 
admitted to having less experience, but said she had fresh 
ideas to bring to the club . Weiss went on to win the assistant 
vice presidential post. 

In the vice presidential race, mctoaShermanreceivedthe 
most votes. Sherman, a native of the Bahamas, said she 
plans to get the SIU more active with the other clubs in 



planning campus activities. 

Sherman ran against Jordanese, Basem Samarah. In 
his campaign speech, Samarah said he had originally I 
joined SIU because he needed to join a club to enhance his ' 
college resume. But said that he has grown to really enjoy 
the SIU club, and will bring his dedication to bear of any 
position that he may be elected to. Samarah then won a 
position on the Intramural Sports Coordinating Council. 

Other officers elected are: Secretary — Cor Grio, Trea- 
surer— Kavita Singh, ICC representative — TrinaWagnac, 
Intramural Chairman— Tony Santos, Activities Chairman 
— Suzan Samarah, and Sergeant-At-Arms — Richard 
Dawkins and Mansoor Khan. 

SIU is in the process of planning many activities for the 
upcoming year. Among their plans is to have one member 
bring in an exotic dish each week and discuss their national 
heritage. There also may be a Halloween dance with 
emphasis on learning about each others culture. SIU meets 
Wednesdays at 3: 15 p.m. in the cafeteria. 



Black Student Union holds elections for office 




By MARK BRUNSKILL 
News Editor 

The Black Student Union (BSU) plans to be very active or| 
central campus this fall. The club has a wide range of actMtie; 
planned. To kick off the activities, a spaghetti luncheon in the 
SAC Lounge Wednesday, Oct. 6, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., wil 
offer students an alternative to cafeteria fare for a day^ 
Spagetti, garlic rolls and a salad for $2.50 will be served. { 

Newly elected President Wilkens Vital, Vice President Jef 
Lane, Secretary Trevor Johnson, assistant Secretary Christo 
pher Thurston and Sergeant at Arms Farah Francois wish tc 
welcome the students to come out and enjoy a deliciou| 
luncheon Oct. 6. 

A fashion show and a carwash are also planned fo: 
sometime during the fall term fundraiser. 



• v '.Lkyii»« ^lmiI^jimIijM(Miiv}y>k 



u 



y^l '* J^VflMl 



Student Resource Council meets 
every Thursday at 5 p.m. in the cafete- 
ria, for more information please con- 
tact Carrol Razza at 439-8090. 



PBCC Players next meetings will 
be held in the Duncan Theatre/west 
entrance on Oct. 7, and every other 
Thursday thereafter at 8:30 a.m. and 
10:10 a.m. 

Please contact Mrs. Sunny Meyer 
at 437-8139 for more information. 



Inter Club Council (ICC) meetings 
areheldeveryThursday at2p.m. in the 
Testing Center in room SA109, all 
students are invited to participate. 



Students for International Under- 
standing (SIU) club meets every 
Wednesday at 3: 1 5 p.m. in the cafete- 
ria, please contact Danita Kurtz at 
439-8233 for more information. 



The Computer Club/DPMA is in- 
terested in new members, they meet! 
the third Saturday of eachmonth at 10 j 
a.m. please contact Mary Kelly at 439- 
8306 or 8124 for location. 







Black Student Union (BSU) meets j 
every Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. in SS| 
104, please contact Gwen Ferguson, if! 
interested, at 439-8327. a 

Delta Omicronchapter ofPhiTheta 
Kappa on central campus meets every 
other Sunday at 7 p.m. in CE121, for 
more information please call Rhonda 
at 439-8229. The next meeting is Oct. 
3. No meeting on Halloween. 



Distributive Education Club of 
America (DECA) meets Tues. Sept. 28 j 
in BA1 13 at 1: 15 p.m. and Wed. Sept. 
29 at 12:30p.m., also Sun. Sept. 26at| 
6p.m. allmeetings are held every other | 
week. 

For more information please callj 
Susan Thompson at 641-0345. 

Intramural sports is offering coed! 
softball. Meet at the softball field Tues- 
days and Thursdays at 3 p.m. 

Games are from October 5 through! 
November 16, 1993, for all students, stafff 
and faculty. 



From L--R, Jeff Lane, Farah Francois, 
Wilkens Vital and Trevor Johnson 



Anyone interested in joining the fun and activities this f; 
with the BSU can contact Gwen Ferguson the club's facul 
advisor at 439-8327. 



Multi-Greek System Offers Support To Black Students 



By KONRAD RIBEIRO 

The Daily 

University of Washington 

Special to College Press Service 

SEATTLE — What do Michael Jordan, Bill 
Cosby, Gov. Douglas Wilder of Virginia, the late 
Arthur Ashe and Mac Jamison, the first black 
woman astronaut, have in common besides being 
some of the nation's most famous black citizens? 



ties and sororities. In spite of the fact that many 
noted black leaders are members, many people 
don't know who and what the Multi-Greeks are. 

Todd Johnson, first vice president of Multi- 
Greek fraternity Phi Beta Sigma at the University 
of Washington, says that community action is the 
philosophy of the Multi-Greeks. 

"We are Greek by letter but our whole goal is 
to uplift the black race and community," he said. 



University in Washington, D.C., at the 
beginning of the century, and member- 
ship has blossomed. 

The Multi-Greek houses at UW — 
four sororities and four fraternities — 
offer black students at UW an organiza- 
tion where friendships can be made 
and a sense of cultural identity can be 
maintained. Membership in the chap- 
ters range from four to 20 members. 

"At the University of Washington, 
African-American students can easily 
become separated," said Malik Davis, 
keeper of the records for Kappa Alpha 
Psi. Only 3 percent of the students at UW are 
black, according to the office of admissions. 

Multi-Greeks often maintain strong ties with 
alumni, creating networks of support. These net- 
works typify the commitment Multi-Greeks say 
they feel for their organizations. 

"If I moved to Washington, D.C., and needed 
help or somewhere to stay, I could look up a 
contact and they'd do anything to help, " said Zeta 
Phi Beta member Brenda Murray. "It's a lifelong 



Please see GREEKS/ 

nano fi 



B ™ " a ^ ' M MlaiB '9W»^ ^ il l iii i ,ll IWP ; a aaragiwTr i>)ffrTfff W "D H i in I h ' i u 

Page 4 BEACHCOMBER September 29, 1993 



September 15, 1993 



BEACHCOMBER 



PageS 




BEACHCOMBER 




Career Center? What Career Center? 



By CHRIS HARRIS 
Features Editor 

Making a career choice is one of the most critical decisions you can make 
in your life, but thankfully, there are some helpful folks at PBCC's Career 
Center who will make your problems a lot easier to bear. 

It's not - — — _ _ surprising to 

there are many 



MANUFACTURING 

9m^ 



CONSTRUCTION 



*gpp»» " « ■* »■ 



HIGH TECHNOLOGY 




dents still roam- 
corridor's of the 
pus in search of 
they have a ma- 
but there's a 
doubt in many 
dents' minds 
of information 
ground concern- 
planned career, 
you turn to for 

in the rear of the 
Student Ser- 
ing, you'll find 
Center which is 
by Counselor 
Interestingly, 




find out that 
college stu- 
ing the dark 
central cam- 
acareer. Sure, 
jor in mind, 
nagging 
of the stu- 
due to a lack 
and back- 
ing their 
But where do 
help? 

Nestled 
Paul Glynn 
vices build- 
the Career 

co-ordinated 

Gail Tomei. 

the center was previously located elsewhere. 

"Well , we were where the testing center is, for a number of years , and then 
it was closed because of budgetry constraints, and we re-opened — has it 
been not even a year yet? — over in this building, a much smaller, condensed 
area," said Tomei. 

Despite the cramped space, the Career Center can answer a lot of 
questions a student might have. 

"It depends where they're in their career planning, but we can help 
students — if a student maybe doesn't have an idea what they want to do and 
they're totally confused, or maybe they have an idea, but they don't know 
anything about it, or maybe they have informational concerns. How much 
money would I make as a whatever? What jobs are in demand?," stated 
Tomei. 

Not only can the career center solve your occupational questions, the 
facility also can help you with transferring to other colleges. 

"We have a SOLAR program which helps if you want to transfer to a 
university in Florida," said Tomei. The system is an academic advising 
program which gives you such important information as a listing of which 
schools offer what majors, what types of special admission requirements are 
needed to transfer to the college, and a listing of important addresses, phone 
numbers, and contact persons in each department. 

If you think that's all that the Career Center offers, think again as there 
are so many sources of information. 

"We have job listings. We have our career consultants — so that if you 
want to talk to someone who is doing something out in the real world, then, 
you can find out what it's really like. We have our career decision making 
program, and also, we have skills-assessment. So if you want to know more 
about yourself, or if you want to identify or learn about careers, and try to 
find a job that's related to that," added Tomei. 

So, with all of this vital information available, how aware is the average 
PBCC student that the Career Center exists? 

"Other than the students who come in, probably not too many. I think 
one of things that hurt us, was our closing. All the instructors were informed 
that we were closed, and so, it's taken a long time to get the word around 
because they'll say to me, 'Oh, I didn't knowyou had it back open again.' So 
people who work here don't know it," commented Tomei. 

As for the future, the Career Center is planning to expand its resources. 

"We received a small grant, a vocational-ed. grant, to add some additional 
computers and network them, so well be able to use the SIGI PLUS (a helpful 



October 3-31: The PBCC Museum of Art 
presents "Art, Money, and Myth," an exibit of 
paintings and sculptures that presents ideas 
concerning the socio-economic side of art. The 
PBCC Museum of Art is located at 601 Lake 
Avenue in downtown Lake Worth and is open 
noon to 5. Tuesday through Sunday. Admission 
is $2. For further information call 582-0006. 
October 4-29: "Voyages to Freedom" exibit will 
be on display at PBCC Central Campus Harold 
C. Manor Library on the third floor. 



•1* MICROSKHXS HI — a computer assisted program that helps 
those of you who would like to change your career. The program 
analyzes your skills, past achievements or previous work 
experience, and then it selects the skills to be used in future jobs. 
*2* FALL SEMESTER PROGRAMS — there's several upcoming 
workshops that could make a big difference for you ("Essentials of 
Resume Writing," "Career Focus For Adult Returning College 
Student," "Unraveling The College Major Maze," and "Developing 
Interviewing Skills.") 

*3* SIGI PLUS — this computer program will examine your 
present values, interests, and skills systematically. Once you enter 
your own preferences, the program searches its built-in library, 
and finds those careers that most closely match those preferences. 
*4* JOB LISTINGS — if you're looking for part time or full time 
employment, the Career Center has an impressive list of jobs 
available. 

*5* RESUME WRITING — not only is there a workshop offered, 
the Career Center also has plenty of handouts, books, and other 
literature available to help you write the perfect resume. 
*6* CAREER CONSULTANTS — the Career Center has a long list 
of individuals who are willing to help students in particular fields. 
Why not talk to the experts before making any big decisions? 
*7* SOLAR — for those of you who need information about 
transferring to a Florida public university, the SOLAR computer 
program will help solve your problems. 
*8* INFORMATION GALORE — the Career Center has a large 
supply of books, videos, catalogues, and other materials for to help 
you research your career. 

*9* COUNSELORS — if you need to talk to someone about your 
future career, there's no better place to go than the Career Center. 
*10* SOURCE — this is another computer program, but this one 
is quite different to the others. SOURCE is a financial aid program 
on the computer. 



computer program) , that is pretty popular on all four computers because it's 
been a problem scheduling people because they want to use it at certain 
times, so now, I'll have more resources available in that area," said Tomei. 
As for when it will be installed, Tomei was not sure. 

"Well, the purchase order for the computers and network is sitting in the 
purchasing department right now. I hope by the end of the semester," added 
Tomei. 

Ok, so you're interested in going to the Career Center for more informa- 
tion. What's the next step? 

"A student needs an appointment to use the computers, and if they say, 
'I want to come in and see you and talk about my future,' we find it works 
better with appointments. But, if they just want to come in, and maybe they 
want to borrow some books on different careers, they want to look at job 
outlook or job listings — no, they don't need an appointment," explained 
Tomei. 

For those of you who would like to visit the Career Center, it's located to 
room 123 of the Paul Glynn Student Services building (in the same hallway 
as the counselors). If you'd like to make an appointment, you can call 439- 
8056 or you can just drop by the center. 

As for their hours of operation, the Career Center is open on Mondays 
and Wednesdays from 9 : 00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. ; Tuesdays and Thursdays from 
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; and Fridays from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m 



CaH 439-8114 for further information. 
October 9: Comedian/ventriloquist Mark Mer- 
chant and keyboardist Hector Olivera will 
perform at PBGC Glades Campus Dolly Hand 
Cultural Arts Center at 8p m Call the box office 
at 992-6160 for reservations and information. 



October 27»November 30: "After the World 
Wars," an exhibit of political cartoons, will be on 
display at the Harold C. Manor Library on the 
first floor. Admission is free. 




BEACHCOMBER 



Hammerbox remains obscure with their A&M debut 



By MOLLY GRABILL 
Staff Reporter 

Hammerbox, one of the Seattle 
underground's most popular live 
bands, achieved phenomenal local 
success with their self-titled inde- 
pendent release in 1991. Following 
riveting performances at the Rock 
for Choice benefit and Seattle's an- 
nual Bumbershoot festival, where 
the band was exposed to thousands 
of new listeners, they were signed to 
A&M Records and had their major 
label debut with Numb.. Despite 
this and splendid critical acclaim, 
Hammerbox remains relatively un- 
known. 

"On the grass-roots level, we've 
always had a really good thing hap- 
pening," explained drummer Dave 
Bosch. "People really seem to be 
into what we are doing. When we 
signed with a major, I was sure we'd 
be able to get our stuff on MTV. 
Evidently, they had other agendas. 











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It's a really funky feeling to find out 
they'd rather play that old Cure video 
from 1979." 

Hammerbox's music refuses to 
be categorized. Though it contains 
the driven guitar and pounding per- 



cussion often associated with 
'grunge,' vocalist Carrie Akre's ex- 
pressive and emotional style sets 
them far apart from other Seattle 
bands that have been flooding the 
mainstream following Nirvana's over- 



powering success. 

"In a way, the media attention 
drawn by Nirvana has helped us in 
that it did draw the label's attention 
into our area, and I don't feel that 
any bands have been signed that 
didn't deserve it," said Bosch. "There 
really are a lot of great bands in the 
Seattle area and they deserve to be 
heard, but if some bands get all the 
attention, then others aren't going 
to get any." 

After three videos and virtually 
no commercial exposure, many 
bands would be discouraged. Bosch, 
however, remains optimistic. "In a 
lot of ways, people are still finding 
out about us. I think that has 
something to do with our music not 
getting play on MTV and the bigger 
radio stations. 

To a lot of those people, we're a 
new band. We don't really fit into a 
mold, we're land of doing our own 
thing. For better or worse, I think 
our music is a bit more challenging, 
so it takes a bit more of an open 
mind." 



Nothing Endearing about 'Dearest 9 ' 

By D.S.ULLERY 
Staff Reporter 

Sometimes I get the feeling that the executives at the Fox Network have 
a dysfunctional sense of humor. What else would explain their series of tragic 
decisions concerning what makes it into the line-up. 

In the past two years, those of you who have continually read my articles 
have learned that I have a real distaste for most of the Fox sitcoms. I've 
constantly attacked such valueless garbage as 'Top Of The Heap," "Living 
Single," and "Married With Children." 

The latest addition to this sordid group further confirms my suspicions 
about the common sense quotient at Fox. 

"Daddy Dearest" is a situation comedy starring comedian Richard Lewis 
as a man who's aging, wiseacre of a father comes to live with him. The father 



is played by veteran comedian Don Rickles. 

The plot is something like this: Aging, cynical scrooge moves in with hip, 
modern son for a continued series of generational clashes and general 
personality conflicts. 

As always, overacting and bad dialogue replace real humor in this lifeless 
half-hour of television. Don Rickles — who makes my skin crawl anyway — 
is at his loathsome worst here, and poor Richard Lewis seems to be pining 
for the return of "Anything But Love." 

Fox will never be considered a major player in the network game until 
they give up the urge to produce this sort of dreck. 

But what separates "Daddy Dearest" from the rest of the diseased crop 
is the fact that the show can't even claim to be original garbage. 

Let's see. A bitter, loud mouthed senior citizen lives with his likeable, yet 
ultimately trodden upon son and constantly makes wisecracks about his 
offspring's lifestyle, etc. Hmm, where have I seen this before. Oh!! Right! It 
was during the seventies. They called it "Sanford and Son". ,-. 

Funny thing, though. I didn't like it then, either. 



' Chevy Chase' needs work to survive Letterman 



By D.S.ULLERY 
Staff Reporter 

I recently wrote an article hailing David 



Letterman as the 
late night televi- 
added a warning 
readers that 
new program 
zon. 

For openers, 
correct date 
program's 
It actually 
the first 
Sept. 7, not 
enth. 

Having 
correction, 
look at this 
hyped 

Chase is 

— it's worth 
just to see 
jokes and 
guests. A lot 
rial is obvi- 
libbed, and 
is as enter- 
ever. 

There are 

— particularly 
video featuring 
Chase faces 
white make-up, 
tunes. The guest 
pressive — in his 
audiences have 
ing with Goldie 
Goldberg, Jason 
Garth, and Martin Short just to name a few. 




new champion of 

sion, but 

reminding 

Chevy Chase's 

was on the hori- 

I typed in the in- 
for the 
premiere, 
aired for 
time on 
the elev- 

made that 
let's take a 
much 
show. 

a great host 
tuning in 
him crack 
off of his 
of his mate- 
ously ad- 
watching him 
taining as 

some nice gags 
a recurring 
a trio of Chevy 
made up in 
singing jazz 
list has been im- 
first two weeks 
seen Chase talk- 
Hawn, Whoopie 
Priestley, Jenni 



After the first thirty minutes, Chevy's per- 
sonality isn't enough to carry the entire show. 
The emphasis on loose, carefree humor be- 
gins to wear thin (Not to mention that the 
comedian's delivery of the "News Update" 
segment of the show is stiff and needs work). 
Also, you don't really find out that much 



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Food gets me 
through my 
nights. 



feel 
Disgusting 



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You're at school. Maybe 
alone for the first time. 
Having classes that are 
unbelievably hard -- the 
pressure is on. As life gets 
more intense, you get more 
obsessed with food. You eat, 
constantly. Hinging and sometimes 
purging. Or you diet as though a 
morsel of food would kill you. 
We understand what you're 
going through. The Renfrew Center, 
known nationally for the successful 
treatment of thousands of women 
with disordered eating, 
offers individual and group 
therapy programs during 
the day, evenings and 
weekends. We have a program near 
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Please call today. 

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about what the stars are doing next, and 
that's one of the main reasons people tune 
into these late night programs to begin with. 

Chase needs to clean up his show. He 
should abandon the 'wild and loose' approach 
and try for a more traditional format. What 
this comic legend, doesn't seem to under- 
stand is, people are tuning in to see him, not 
some crazy montage of off the wall jokes . If he 
actually provides a program with some sub- 
stance, then Chevy Chase will takeover as a 
late night force to be reckoned with. 

So, for the moment, Letterman is still the 
best. But keep your eyes open Dave. If Chevy 
comes to his senses, things may very well 
change. 

"Chevy Chase" airs from 11p.m. - 12p.m. 
on Fox Mon-Fri. Oh, one more thing. The 
opening graphics — featuring a claymation 
Chevy stealing letters from various rooftop 
billboards to spell his own name — are as 
funny as they are impressive. 



Cancer Care Center 

At Good Samaritan 

Parftime flexible hours in the 

Radiation Therapy Dept. at Good ; 

Samaritan Medical Center, duties 

include: transporting patients outside 

of hospital, light maintenance, and 

processing films in radiation therapy 

deptartment. Please call Suzaiv 

at 833-821 2 if interested. 




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Page 6 



BEACHCOMBER 



September 29, 1993 



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CRIME/ 

from front page 

Whitman suggest students follow: 

A student's best form of self- 
protection is being aware of dangers 
and taking simple precautions. Use 
escort services, don't drink to excess 
and try not to stay out too late because 
most student crime occurs between 1 
a.m. and 4 a.m. 

Always write your name in text- 
books, and come up with a personal 
number and write your name in every 
book on that page as well. Such marks 
help identify books that have been 
stolen. Textbook theft rings have be- 



come very big business on campus, 
particularly with books in the higher 
level science courses. Whitman said. 
Askabout Operation ID programs 
on campus to have your driver's li- 
cense number engraved on all valu- 
able equipment, such as CD players, 
TVs, VCRsand bicycles. If theitemsare 
stolen, police have a much better 
chance of returningtheproperty. With- 
out the ID, you can kiss your merchan- 
dise good-bye. Whitman said. 

Drink sensibly if you choose to 
drink alcohol at all. Designate a driver 
if you're driving with a group to an off- 
campus hot spot. It's actually a good 
idea to carouse in groups, or at least in 



GREEKS/ 

from page 3 
commitment, a really strong bond." 

Some members of the Multi-Greek fraternities choose to have their letters 
or a single letter branded on them. This is accomplished by pressing a piece 
of hot metal, usually a hanger bent into the desired shape, into the skin. A 
smooth, raised scar is formed. 

"Each fraternity has a reason for the brand," said Chris Mosely, Omega 
Psi Phi member and president of the Multi-Greek Council. He emphasized 
the secrecy of the meaning behind each person's decision to wear the brand . 

Davis said no one is forced to brand, nor does everyone choose to have 
it done, but for some Multi-Greeks it is a visual symbol of their dedication 
to their brothers . "I personally don't know why anyone would do that, " Davis 
said. 

The fraternities and sororities are loosely connected by the Multi-Greek 
Council. The council, made up of representatives from each house, meets 
weekly and works on an agenda of projects that include a yearly scholarship 
award, Black History Month programs and the yearly "step" show which is 
an exhibition of African folk dancing to a hard musical beat. 





CAROL RAZZA 

(L.C.M.H.C.) 



Sunday Octobor 3, 1993 

e - 7 p».ivi. 

Students Activities Centt 

POT LUCK DINNER 

rirr»mocll»tly fallowing workshop] 

RSVP: 

rvms. I_. CLOIMT2 
[«07]73B -778E 

Sponsored by eho newly formed 

STUDENT BUPPOHT CENTER OBCC 

WELLNESS CLUB 



PoePm 



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Jrm 






Pair/Pings, 
Photography, ePc. . 

Apollo's Lute, PBGC's Literary Journal, is now 
seeking submissions from all sPudenPs and 
faculty in Phe above caPegories. Deadline for 
submissions is November JO for Phe 95-94 
ed/P/on. which will be published in Phe winPer 
session. 

Prop Submissions in our mailboK locaPed in 
CPI KXX/P's marked Apollo's LuPe). 

Please b>e kind enough Po include a S.A.S.E. if 
uou would like anifPhing rePurned. In Phe case of 
original arPioil on canvas. ePc.) please conPacP 
Dr. MarPin at 3.A. 303. 

Also, Apollo's Lute would like to thank the following 
people who have given us their undivided support: 
Scott MacLachlan, Eileen Holden, John Schmiederer, 
r»r. Melvin Haynes and Hamid Faquir. 



pairs. Being drunk and alone is like 
wearing a sign that says, "Hey! Mug 
me." If youVe had too much to drink, 
don't stagger home alone on foot; hang 
around and drink some juice or water 
at the bar and wait until you sober up 
a little. 

Don't automatically trust other 
people, even those you know. Not ev- 
eryone is as honest as you are, and if 
you leave a wallet tying open in your 
room or at a study carel, don't be 
surprised if the cash is missing when 
you get back. To a thief, opportunity is 
everything. 

If you see something or someone 
that looks suspicious, report it. Siegel 
says it's amazing how often people see 
crimes being committed, yet no one 
alerts authorities. Even if you're not 
sure, call the campus police or the 
dorm desk clerk. The man who killed 
14 people with a gun at a Montreal 
university walked through campus 
with the weapon and an ammunition 
beltinopenviewindaylightandno one 
reported it, Siegel said. 

Write down the numbers of your 
credit cards and keep them in a safe 
place. If cards are stolen, you should 
report it as soon as possible to keep 
crooks from running up a tab. What- 
everyou do, don't write your pin num- 
ber on your automatic teller bank card 
or a telephone calling card. 

And now, to see how you fared on 
the quiz: 

1. The answer is A Always lock 



your door. B is OK, butyourroommate 
also might decide to leave the room 
unattended for just a few minutes to 
get a soda. Besides, you wouldn't want 
to leave your roommate alone and 
helpless in an unlocked room, would 
you? He's such an innocent. If you 
answered C, start worrying about the 
company you keep. 

2. B. Don't walk off and leave your 
textbooks anywhere. Whitman says 
some thieves specialize in strolling 
through student centers and libraries, 
swiping books as they go. 

3. C. Ifhe'sthat cute inadingy bar, 
think what he'll look like in daylight. If 
you answered A, you're probably free- 
spirited and fun to be around, but 
maybe not for long. Getting loaded and 
leaving a bar with someone who's 
practically a stranger is one of the most 
dangerous things you can do, putting 
you at risk of physical assault and 
other nasties like AIDS or herpes, 
Whitman and Siegel say. And don't 
think you're safe just because you're 
male. Some guys have been surprised 
by brutish pimps or boyfriends hiding 
in wait who wouldn't think twice about 
pulling a gun and demanding money. 
Alcohol impairs judgment; ask any- 
one who has ever awakened beside a 
beast who seemed like a beauty the 
night before. Eewww. What were you 
thinking? Answer B? Taking him or 
her home is even worse because you 
could expose your roommates to dan- 
ger as well as yourself. 




CREDIT CLASSES AVAILABLE 
EVENINGS - WEEKDAYS -- SATURDAYS 



m 



BOCA RATON 

Non-Credit/Job Prep short term workshops also 

available at reasonable fees in insurance, 
childcare, computers, medical and many more. 



For more information please call 
(407) 367-4523 in Boca Raton 

PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE 
The South Campus 



ms&s&jzswia&ss&ssm 



Get on the Fast Track at 
Florida Atlantic University! 



jeKemi 



iSiisniess 
ctoifleistrati 




Classes Meet on Saturdays 

• AACSB Accredited • 
• Financial Aid Available • 



Find out if you qualify today! 

Call Peter Goumas, Program Coordinator, 

at (407) 367-2709. 



September 15, 1993 



BEACHCOMBER 



Page 7 






BEACHCOMBER 



Virginia Johnson fields strong 
women's tennis team again 



By JUSTIN KNAPFEL 
Sports Editor 

After an undefeated season 
last year, the PBCC women's ten- 
nis team is getting ready for the 
exhibition season and the Rolex 
Tournament. 

The Rolex Tournament will 
be held at the Broward Commu- 
nity College campus in Ft. Lau- 
derdale on October 8, 9, and 10. 
Each community college in 
Florida is invited. Each school 
brings their top four singles and 
top two doubles players. If a 
school chooses not to show up, 



then the stronger teams receive 
extra berths in the tournament. 

Last year at the Rolex Tour- 
nament Marie Wilhelmsson of 
PBCC won the singles title. 
Wilhelmsson and Donna 
Lomenzo also won the doubles 
title. "It was a very good tourna- 
ment for us last year," contended 
Coach Virginia Johnson. 

Wilhelmsson went on to the 
National Championship and 
placed fifth in singles competi- .. 
tion in the nation. Wilhelmsson 
and Lomenzo teamed up to take 




fourth in doubles in the nation. 
Last season, the Panthers ten- 
nis team was incredible. They 
went undefeated against all com- 
munity colleges, and they terror- 
ized several four-year universi- 
ties such as Dartmouth, DePaul, 
Columbia, and Cornell. Their 
only loss was at Lynn University. 
Lynn won the National Champi- 
onships. 

Not much has changed since 
last season, five of the top six 
women will be returning: Natali 
Sunara, Clarissa Medeiros, 
Athena Constantinou and Aredi 
Constantinou. 

"It's going to be a good, strong 
team this year," said Johnson. 



Aredi Constantinou 



Open tryouts 
January 1. 



will be held 



PBCC baseball team struggled last 
year but is ready for the new season 

By JUSTIN KNAPFEL 
Sports Editor 

After a disappointing season last year, the Palm Beach Community 
College Panthers baseball team looks promising for the upcoming season 
because some fine new recruits have been signed. 

PBCC signed six players from the first team of the All-Area baseball team . 
Kerry Mikulski, one of the Panthers signees, played first base for Pope John 
Paul where he hit ,533 with four home runs and batted in 31 runs, he also 
hit 15 doubles. 

Other outstanding freshmen: pitcher Mark Brownson, catcher Tony 
Morales, and outfielders Steve Kokinda, Brian Dodge, and Gary Borge. 



Brownson had a record of 8-3 and had an ERA of 1.38. He also struck out 
95 batters in 76. 1 innings. 

Morales had a .428 batting average and 30 RBI at Forest Hill. Kokinda 
went to Cardinal Newman where he batted .393 with three home runs. Dodge 
hit .453 at Atlantic and Borge hit .345 at Palm Beach Gardens. 

"We have guys like Juan Veras who are returning that are top notch kind 
of kids," said Coach Gero. Along with Veras, Ken Wagner and Steve Adams 
will also return. A plus to the team is that they have five players who were 
drafted earlier this y ear . Veras was drafted by the Texas Rangers , Wagner was 
drafted by the Milwaukee Brewers, Kokinda was drafted by the Montreal 
Expos, Brownson was drafted by the Colorado Rockies, and Mikulski was 
also drafted by the Milwaukee Brewers. ■<>< 

■ir> 

Last season the roster contained 19 freshmen out of 25 players. "Last 
year we were very young," explained Gero. This season they will have more 
experienced players, and will also bring in some great young talent. By 
January, the roster will be cut to 25 players after a series of fall exhibition 
games. 



GROUPS®CLUBS 



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IN LESS THAN A WEEK 

Plus, win a trip to MTV SPRING 
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WPJBdL Blaze, Sunshine Hockey League 

champion's, prepare for '93-'94 season 



hungry? 

P T K Delta Omicron 



By JUSTIN KNAPFEL 
Sports Editor 

The Sunshine Hockey 
League is gearing up for its 
second season of profes- 
sional minor league hockey, 
and the West Palm Beach 
Blaze are preparing to de- 
fend their championship 
title. 

A 54-game regular sea- 
son schedule has been re- 
leased by the league. The 
season will begin in early 
November and end in late 
March. The Blaze will play 



28 home games, and their 
home opener will be on No- 
vember 12 against Lakeland. 
Daytona will visit West Palm 
the following night. Their fi- 
nal home game of the sea- 
son will be on March 26 
against Lakeland. Most of 
the games will be played on 
Friday and Saturday nights. 

The competition is ex- 
pected to be fiercer this year. 
Many free-agent players in 
North America and Europe 
are fond of the idea of spend- 
ing winter in Florida playing 



professional hockey. Also, 
each team has spent the 
summer scouting for new 
players to include in the 
upcoming season. 

Tickets for the Blaze 
will go on sale November 1 
at TicketMaster and at the 
West Palm Beach Audito- 
rium box office. Prices 
range from $6.50 to 
$12.50. Children under 12 
and seniors over 55 will 
receive a $1.00 discount. 
Group rates will also be 
available. 



presents 



'Nite Bites' 



lesday evenings from SiM to 9 p.n 
Located on the BA Patio 
Central Campus 



Get out of the hot sun 
and into the shade! 



Chris' do-it-yourself auto repair shop 
announces big savings $$!! We have three 
full-size bays, all the tools you'll need, a 
hydraulic lift, and Chilton car repair 
manuals for your convenience 



Rates begin at 
$3.00 per hour. 



3626 East Industrial Way 
Riveria Bch., 33404 Hours Tuesday to 
Friday 12noon - 8p.m. Saturday 9am-9pm 
and Sunday/Monday by apptointment only. 
Phone (407) 844-7821 or (407) 478-5345 




— *wT^uB,»irtf>«i««B WB1B -p hHcr . | |||| || I, I,, , il l,,, !,,,,!!, H iiiiii nn-nn iEn 



Page 8 



BEACHCOMBER 



September 29, 1993 



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BEACHCOMBER 



( \ 



STRANGE 



^iiii&iffia^^- 




The video revolution 



IWANXYOU 




5 ARKER PANTHER 

WANTS YOU 

to join in FBCCs 60th Anniversary 

Diamond Jubilee celebration 

and become Mr./Ms. PBGC. 

If you are selected Mr. or Ms. PBCC, 

you will receive a $500 scholarship 

from the PBGC Foundation 

^ to attend any one of the College's 

four campuses. For application forms 

and contest requirements, visit 

your campus' bookstore, library 

or cafeteria. 

Winners will be announced at the 

District Board of Trustees meeting 

on Wednesday, December 8. 



3dward M. Eissey serves a 
PBCC president, and the 
College is govwned by the 
Palm Beach CommunAy 
College District Board 
of Trustees. 





Parker Panther 




THE Crossword 



ACROSS 
1 Food lish 
5 Spoksn 
10 Letter on a 

key 

14 Atmosphere: 
praf. 

15 Lower in rank 

16 Kind of exam 

17 Custard dessert 
1B Cuttlefish ink 

19 Concerning 

20 Home for an 
ambassador 

22 Professional 

play«r 
24 Pester 

26 Hurry 

27 Church affair 
30 Fruit 

35 Apportion 

36 Sound loudly 

37 551 

38 Claim against 
property 

39 Sets a trap 

40 Bartlett 

41 Actress Gardner 

42 Angelic 
instruments 

43 Blackboard 

44 Oil field items 

46 Rang 

47 Lodge member 

48 Works for 
wages 

50 Royal 

messengers 
54 Scatters trash 

58 Very dry 

59 Made of cereal 
grain 

61 Graven image 

62 Acid fruit 

63 Open 

64 Refer to 

65 Sly look 

66 Leases 

67 Fret 

DOWN 

1 Secure 

2 Tiller 

3 Bedouin 

4 Gift to charity 

5 Slave 

6 Follows orders 




7 Hat 

8 Continent 

9 Tanned hides 

10 Heating system 
item 

11 Sea bird 

12 Small pie 

13 Nautical term 
21 Chair 

23 Employ 
25 Surpass 

27 Dish of greens 

28 Martini garnish 

29 Unobstructed 

31 Berets and 
tarns 

32 Perfect image 

33 Make happy 

34 Fathered 

36 Tree coaling 

39 Rear exit 

40 Synthetic 
materials 

42 Elevation 

43 Transmitted 

45 School book 

46 Publishes 



Answers 



anaa naaHH naEiin 



nana &biiqgo nrjrin 



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nnnun niininH una 



mma nnnnn nnncm 
fi 3 ana nun cjririanjn 

^^OHBIl&BElOIIP;^' ' 

naansH Bananas 
nnnni nnnnn nnnn 
anno aanraa araan 
nana annaa anno 



September 15, Puzzle 



49 Warning sound 

50 Passageway 

51 Great Lake 

52 Frost 

53 Rescue 



55 Ready tor 
publication 

56 Memory 

57 Large amount 
60 Knockout count ! 





Welcome 

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(the Beachcomber^ resents a new cen- 
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^ — See pages 6 & 7 



flondu Community Colkge 
Tress ■Association 




'J - .OL>. _ li ., ll\ I'.Lii ' 



Are Liberals trying to Hush Rush by resur- ! 
reeling the 1949 FCC Fairness Doctrine? ! 
You decide. 

— See Page 2 



i^q 



■- .»F.J/ 




I V 



Volume 54 Number 1 PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE ♦ LAKE WORTH, FLORIDA 



January 19, 1994 



Panther Park under new 
management — Phase Two 
due to open in February 



By TROY CRAGO 
Staff Reporter 

When the doors first 
opened to Panther Park, 
residents found themselves 
living in a construction site 
without the benefit of 
phone service or cable TV, 
and many apartments were 
not completely furnished 



as promised. According to 
Doug Johansen, President 
and Executive Director of 
the Foundation (fund rais- 
ing arm of PBCC) many of 
the problems have been 
rectified. 

But some problems re- 
main; 

"I've been trying for two 



weeks to get my washer 
and dryer repaired," said 
student resident Dan 
Prussman, "we pay a lot of 
money to live in Panther 
Park and we expect new 
housing to have working 
appliances." Prussman 
said that he and his room- 
mates have been forced to 



wash their clothes at a . 
laundromat — adding to 
their expenses. (At press 
time, General Electric had 
scheduled their second at- 
tempt to repair the prob- 
lem, the first attempt 
failed). 

According to Fawn 
Parks, newly installed man- 
ager of Panther Park, the 
problem is with General 
Electric (GE). Parks, em- 
ployed by Panther Park's 
new management com- 
pany, Breaux, Rey and As- 
sociates Inc. of Plantation 
Florida. , said GE is respon- 
sible for warranty work, 
which this is, and that she 
can't force them to provide 
speedy service. 



When the apartments 
were opened in the sum- 
mer private phone lines had 
been promised but only one 
per apartment was deliv- 
ered — but they didn't work 
for over two weeks. Cur- 
rently there are two oper- 
ating phone lines per unit 
with the expansion to five 
lines in the works after 
resident's demands. 

Since the repeal of a 
Florida law preventing 
community colleges from 
owning or building student 
housing, PBCC is the sec- 
ond community college to 
take the plunge. Tallahas- 
see CC was the first in the 

Please see PPark/ 5 




H«iMI«e*,IW 



««MKKMITY 






Cmos Martinez "*50( «»"** SwiwrHMA Iw* \*500.' 

FIVE HUNDRED m® *y„, S0LI.A8S WE HTOWSD m ® ^w^LLASS 

wmoMtRRM. ^V'.;- .*«. Ms.fi8.ftG 



09 




File Photo 



L-R Palm Beach Community College students Carlos Martinez and Syrinithnia lies were 
named Mr. and Ms. PBCC in a recent essay competiton and each received a $500 
scholarship. The check was presented by PBCC President Edward Eissey and his wife 
Faye Eiss ey, who were chosen Mr. and Miss PBJC in 1 946. 

Annual Writes of Spring festival 
returns to Eissey campus in March 



By DOUG SHVPE 

Staff Reporter/North Campus 

When the temperature begins 
to rise and "spring fever" is in the 
air, the Edward M. Eissey campus 
holds its annual "Writes of Spring." 
This is a day of focusing on South 
Florida's environment through 
songs, dance, lectures, poetry, and 
visual arts . The event is not too far 
off and about 50 volunteers are 
currently needed from all PBCC 
campuses to assist in fund rais- 
ing, entertainment etc. 

The event was originally called 
"The Writes of Spring: A Celebra- 
tion at the Spring Equinox" by its 
founder former PBCC Eissey Cam- 
pus professor Edwin Riley. Riley 
coordinated the first "Writes of 
Spring" in 1991. 

Riley was "shocked" in April of 
1992 when he was informed that 



his contract would not be renewed . 
Riley, considered to be one of the 
best professors by his students, 
was dismissed due to budget cuts 
—the official statement from PBCC. 

His "Writes of Spring" will be 
held for the fourth consecutive year 
on March 24th. 

"We really start planning for 
the Writes of Spring' early, we start 
right away," said Grace LaGrasso, 
coordinator of fund raising. 

Events are planned from 9:00 
a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Ongoing events 
include a pinata show and sale; an 
environmental street theater; a tree 
and shrub sale; a "Writes of Spring" 
t-shirt and poster sale as well as 
Environmental Awareness Booths 
around the campus. 

Please see Writes, page 4 



Germany prepares for 
worst as neo-Nazis march 



, World community turns its 
attention to Germany and Russia 



By DANIEL M. MOON 
StaffReporter 

The rise of neo-fascism In Germany has political scientists 
around the world concerned that a Fourth Reich may be emerging. 
Given Germany's past history, and its present turbulent economic 
conditions, the world community has good reason to be concerned. 

To help political science students to better understand what 
may be fueling the resurgence of Naziism, Palm Beach Cornrnunity 
College Professor Dan O Connell invited three German university 
professors to share their concerns with his Comparative Govern- 
ments class. 

Dr. Stephanie Schultze, a political science professor at the 
University of Berlin, says the reunification of Germany and its 
resulting problems are due to "economic shock. " Former East 
Germans were totally dependent on their government to provide 
them with many necessities that a free market economy cannot, 
Schultze explained. 

"Reunification has not been as easy as political scientists led us 
to believe," says Schultze. Many former East German citizens, 
Shultzesays, are without workinthenew free market economy due 
to a lack of skills. As a result, unemployment is at 50 percent. East 
Germans grew up, were educated and lived under a communist 
system that guaranteed a job to every adult and provided day care 
for every single or married mother. And, according to Schultze, 
these former communist citizens don't understand why the govern- 
ment won't support them now. Further, they don't even know how 
to look for a job in a free economy. 

Immigration also has been fueling the return to facism. The 
former East Germans don't understand why non-Germans are 
receiving welfare benefits and finding jobs while they are only 
getting the same benefits as non-Germans. The resentment is very 
aeep-seeded, says Schultze. 

And as has been reported by the media in the United States, 
Schultze acknowledged, the neo-Nazi movement in Germany, 
despite its being illegal, is receiving money and para-rnilitary 
trai ning from similar groups in the United States, such as the Klu 

Klux fflan. 

Schultze says the potenial for more violence in Germany, "is 
high, very high." And, unfortunately, she doesn't foresee reason to 
hope in the near future due to an economy that is a few generations 
away from health. 

"Germany is not yet truly unified," she said. 

Germany bears watching. The trend toward a fractured society 
is also starkly manifested in Bosnia, and could be just the begirinirig 
of a world-wide extinguishing of the light of reason. 



i~m « nmiiinni i m i w i#i' i mb ii i n i nn i inn r rft rnini 



Page 2 the BEACHCOMBER January 19,1 994 



t 



January 19, 1994';' "" "meBEACHCWbER' 



Page 3 1 



III 
i 



Editorial 



BEACHCOMBER 



Liberals scurry to silence Rush Limbaugh 

It's time to vote these bozo's out of office 



1949 and 1987, the 



By MIKE MTTSEFF 
Editor 

Between 
fledgling 
Federal 
Communi- 
cations 
Commis- 
sion (FCC) 
enacted an 
insidious 
assault on 
the freedom 
of speech. It 
considered 
unchal- 
lenged ideas 
a menace to 
otherwise 
clear-think- 
ing and in- 
telligent 
Americans. • 

So with this 

in mind, ideologies expressed over 
the airwaves were subject to forced 
rebuttal. 

The Fairness Doctrine of 1949 
wasneitherfairnorwasitjust, but 
its demise in 1987 at the hands of 
then president Ronald Reagan gar- 
nered few mourners. 

According to its critics, the FD 
was introduced primarily to silence 
one side of the debate. By inter- 
jecting an opposite position into 
every argument, the doctrine suc- 
cessfully quelled robust prosely- 
tizing. Ostensibly, it was enacted 



very agency which enacted the doc- 
trine in the first place, and they 
said so in 1987. They believed that 

the FD ac- 



"Our strategy was to chal- 
lenge and harass right-wing 
broadcasters and hope that 
the challenges would be so 
costly to them that they 
would be inhibited and de- 
cide it was too expensive for 
them to continue." 

— Bill Ruder, President Kennedy's 
assistant secretary of commerce: 



t u a 1 1 y , 
"stifled free 
and open 
discussion 
and inhib- 
ited free 
speech." 

De- 
spite this 
frank state- 
ment, the 
FD is being 
r e s u r - 
rected as 
"The Fair- 
ness in 
Broadcast- 
ing Act of 

1993" (H.R. 

1985 and 
S. 333). President Clinton has 
promised to sign this latest piece 
of Liberal flotsam once it crosses 
his desk. 

Just who is behind this resur- 
rected muzzle to free speech. Who 
would strike at the very founda- 
tion of our right to be wrong, and 
why? 

Lemme see, hmmm, who could 
it be? 

Maybe the conservative, right- 
wing, Christian-fundamentalist 
folks are behind this? They're al- 
ways standing for something in 



to balance opinions expressed-©n— "-stead-offalling for anyffiifif.' Biitl 



a limited number of radio/televi 
sion stations in the early '50s. So 
to prevent any one position (left or 
right) commandeering all of the 
available air time, the FD was born. 

But its usefulness has long 
since run out. This is the '90s, and 
every idea, no matter how absurd 
or dangerous, has its voice on one 
of the many cable, satellite, broad- 
cast, public, digital or the many 
other new technologies that are 
networking like-minded thinkers. 
In light of our technological ad- 
vances of the twentieth century, is 
the Doctrine really needed? 

Not, according to the FCC, the 



no, I think the truth will reveal this 
new Doctrine is to be used against 
one side of the debate, and one 
side only. 

Although Liberal Democrats 
are scurrying to deny it, their fin- 
gerprints are all over this "legisla- 
tion." It is so obvious, that the bill 
is called the Hush Rush bill. 

Could it be true? 

All too true, but Limbaugh is 
not their only target. The Liberal 
elitists who support free* speech, 
only when they are talking, also 
have targeted right-wing religious 
fundamentalists too. (I feel safer 
now, no not Morley, but some!) 



Get on the Fast Track at 
Florida Atlantic University! 

Weekend 
Bachelor of 
Business 
Administration 




Classes Meet cm Saturdays 

•AACSB Accredited* 
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Find out if you qualify today! 

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Editor 

Associate Editor 
Sports Editor 
Entertainment Editor 
Photography Editor 
Advertising Manager 



the BEACHC OMBER 

— 1993 — 

Florida Community College Press Association 

Award Winners 

— George P. Reis — 
First place Best Arts Review 4 

Second place tn-depth Reporting. 

— Robert G. Gerard — 

Third place Sports Photo. 

— Beachcomber — 
Third place Design/Layout. 



Mike MitaefT 

Glen Friedman 

JustlnKnapfel 

D.S. UHery 

Robert Gerard 

Kenneth {Dan) prussmatt 



Contributing Reporters 

Molly Grabill, Dave Montalbano, . Troy Crago 
Christopher Thurston. Stacey Skinner, Mike Glaraatt, 
Daniel Moon, Loura l^afayette.Doug Shupe and Chris Harris 

Opinions expressed in tbe Beachcomber do not necessarily reflect 
the views of the Beachcomber or Palm Beach Community college. 
Letters to the Editor must be signed. 



Palm Beach Community College 

BEACHCOMBER 

4200 Congress Avenue 

I-ake Worth, FL 3346 1 -4796 

(407) 439-8064 Fax (407) 439-82 10 





Dr. Edward Eissey 
.President/Publisher 



Ms. Vicki Scheurer 
Faculty Adviser . 



Accordingto Reed Irvine and Cliff 
Kincald, writer's of Media Monitor in 
Washington D.C., Talkers Magazine, 
which covers talk radio, identified 
the groups supporting the FD. 

Fanfare, flourish. 

"The Democratic (Party) leader- 
ship (NOOOO), the ACLU fTHEM 
TOO!?), the various (Ralph) Nader 
groups (NOT RALPH TOO), most civil 
rights, abortion rights and feminist 
groups, along with virtually all envi- 
ronmental, gay rights, and antl- 
-nuelear groups." WELL. I AM SUR- 
PRISED! . Not. 

According to Home Times, the 
Wall Street Journal noted that both 
the Nixon and Kennedy administra- 
tions had used the FD as a weapon to 
try to silence those who disagreed 
with them, and quoting Bill Ruder, 
President Kennedy's assistant sec- 
retary of commerce: 

"Our strategy was to challenge 
and harass right-wing broadcasters 
and hope that the challenges would 
be so costly to them that they would 
be inhibited and decide it was too 
expensive for them to continue." 

So are we being protected for our 
own good, AGAIN? We VOTERSmust 
not have the sense to think for our- 
selves, and definitely, without help 
from our benevolent politicians. 

But what of religious broadcast- 
ers? What if they propose an opinion 



contrary to the current Politically 
Correctprotectors of anything smaclc- 
fng of free thought? 

Again, according to Home Times, 
quoting Religious Broadcasting 
magazine: 

"Reenactment of the FD today 
would be a threat and problem for all 
broadcasters, especially religious 
broadcasters. In this time of political 
correctness, part of the elitist agenda 
is, knowingly or unknowingly, trie ' 
suppression of free speech that Is 
•hot, m their opiriibn, politically cor*-* 
rect." 

Have we come so far to have trie 
free exchange of ideas circumvented 
by a small but vocal group of spine- 
less politicians who are so afraid trie 
right of the people to hold contrary 
ideas? Must they resort to gaggtog 
any and all philosophical discourse 
by constantly interjecting opposing 
viewpoints? 

You decide. A common saying 
used by free men and women, crril- ; 
dren and pets in 1960s Ohio was ' 
this: 

"I disagree with what you've said , 
but I'll defend to the death your right 
to say it." 

Can you finish this sentence? I 
hope so. 

"The price of freedom is eterri 
— what? "** i 




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Page 4 



the BEACHCOMBER January 19, 1994 



January 19, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Pages 



NewS 

-A. v esc ArurnwnPD ^^adDr 



BEACHCOMBER J 



Ken Marion takes over the reigns of student 
government amidst the confusion of drop/add week 



Student 



By STACEY SKMNER 
Staff Reporter 

Take a deep breath. Smell that? It's the 
smell of a new term; fresh classes, new 
people to meet, new names to learn, and 
now that a new term has started, you 
realize that you now have more places to 
go and people to meet! Hot on the he;els of 
this new term is a new Student Government 
president and officers. I recently had the 
pleasure of conducting an interview with Mr. 
Kenneth Marion, a first year student with a 
major in physical therapy. You cduld 
not ask for a more friendly, down-td- 
earth man for your Student Govern 
ment president. Marion is 28 years 
old, and now that he is your presi- 
dent, he has a lot of ideas in mind to help 
boost patriotism in our school. One -such hot 
idea is what he likes to call "Pack The Gym" nights. 
The aim of this activity, according to Marion, is to 
"enhance the [basketball] program here on campus". 
Marion, as well as the men's basketball coach, Scott 
Pospichal, feel that students don't lend enough sup- 
port due either to time schedule or living distance 
from the school. Many students just don't feel like 
driving all the way home and then driving all the way 
back to school to watch a ball game . "Pack The Gym" 
will include free throw contests, door prizes, and 
even a basketball game between students and fac- 
ulty. Marion hopes to put this plan into action at the 
upcoming Indian River game on January 26th. 

As of late, many of the major details concerning 



09 

it jmim^mmiK ha; 



ImlQniX 



IIHIIMIH 




Student Government have not been 
ironed out. SGA's new Treasurer, Dawn 
Visile, has not had the opportunity to 
discuss the budget plans with Dean of 
Student Activities Scott Maclach- 
lan. Once the two week drop/add 
period is over and the chaos that 
usually accompanies it is over, Marion 
has stated that his schedule will be- 
come a little more regular and meetings 
11 begin to be held on a regular basis, 
e first public meeting to be held will be 
this Thursday, Jan. 13 in the rear of the 
cafeteria. Anyone who would like to 
" jfet CHUUeni come is welcome, club activi- 

J JF ~ ties will be discussed and 

"*>„. (jrOVernment Marion is going to bring up the idea of 

lelp ^S>. A<mnHntir\n changing meeting dates from a 
. . > /-vaau^iauuil ThursdaVi He ls stul unsU re as to 

when he would like to move the meetings as 
students are still changing their schedules, but 
the idea will be discussed at the meeting. 

When I completed the interview I left with a 
heightened sense of confidence. Ken Marion knew 
what he was talking about and he had the ideas to 
put his plans into action. This 28 year old knows 
what he wants to achieve and he wont stop until 
it gets done. This is how I felt when I left his office, 
hopefully you will feel the same way when he is 
sworn into his other office, our Student Govern- 
ment President. Marion will be sworn in on 
Tuesday Jan. 22nd at 2pm in Mr. Maclachlan's 
office. 




STUDENTS FOR INTERNATIONAL 

UNDERSTANDING = FRIENDS 
More than just a club 



By STACEY SKINNER 
Stqff Reporter 

Does meeting new people 
cause you to break out in a ner- 
vous sweat? Are you interested in 
having a good time? Do you like to 
meet new people from different 
cultures? If you answered 'Yes' to 
any or all of these questions, then 
the Students for International Un- 
derstanding Club is for you. The 
club is open to all PBCC students 
with an interest in foreign cul- 
tures. 

One of the club's main objec- 
tives is to unite students of many 
' different nations and to promote 
understanding and good will 
within the club, PBCC and the 
community. SIU gives students 
an opportunity to meet people from 
their own country as well as other 
countries and to assist each other 
in adapting to the American cul- 
ture. SIU strives to improve the 
quality of life at PBCC in offering a 
wide variety of cultural and social 
activities. 

The International Food Festi- 
val is one of the club's major ac- 
tivities every year. Dishes and 



desserts from many different 
countries are served by interna- 
tional students. Occasionally, 
students gather informally for soc- 
cer or volleyball games. 

Students in SIU also provide 
services to individuals and orga- 
nizations in the Palm Beach 
County community. Services 
range from language translations 
to the Food For Families Thanks- 
giving drive. 

If your interest is peaked, then 
contact Danita Kurtz at 439-8233 
or Rohini Uppal (SIU president) 

Special note: Students For In- 
ternational Understanding will be 
offering the Harry S, Truman 
Scholarship. This offers up to 
$30,000 in scholarships for col- 
lege students preparing for public 
service careers. Deadline for re- 
ceipt of nominations: FEBRUARY 
25, 1994. 

For more information or 
application material contact: 
CeritralScott Maclachlan 439-8 106 
North: Idell McLaughlin 625-2527 
South: Kim Niemczyk 
367-4525 
Belle Glade: Sue Lott992-6151 



ITS TIME.. 




I ma 

b SEUL 

§ 
I 




JUJbJJLls. 

-Get to Know U5- 

Free Taco 

with the pmttttms* of $l-*0 Of mot* 

Good at: eaes.West Lake Worth Road 
tri LAKE: WORTH 



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mctc 

THE GYM 

for 



Florida's two 
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MEN'S 

(7:30) 
Women's 

(5i30) 
PANTHER 



Jaouary-22 



Saturday 



Mcetiiisis around contra I camriiis 



StudentResouree Council (SRC) 

meets every Thursday at 5 p.m. in 
the cafeteria. For more Information 
please contact Carrol Razza at 
439-8090. IKFO. NOT UPDATED 

FBCCFiayog/rheafaeCM? meets 
every other Thursday at 10: 10 a.m. 
in the Duncan Theatre/west en- 
trance. Next meeting is scheduled 
for Jan. 20. 

Please contactMrs. Sunny Meyer 
at 437-8139 for more information. 

Inter Club Council (ICC) 

Meetings are held every Thursday at 
1:30 p.m. in the SAC LOUNGE, all 
students are invited to participate. 

Students for International Un- 
derstanding (SIU) club meets every 
Wednesday at 3:15 p.m. in the caf- 
eteria, please contact Danita Kurtz 
at 439-8233 for more information, 



The Computer Club/DPMA Is 

interested- in-new members, they 
meet the third Saturday of eaclx 
month at 10 a.m. Please contact: 
Mary Kelly McWaters for location at 
439-8306. 

Black Student Union fBSU) 
meets every Wednesday at 1:30 
and Wednesday at 12:30 in SS 
103. Next meeting will be held on 
the January 19. For more infor- 
mation contact Mrs. Gwen 
Ferguson at 439-8327. 

ftttft* Omtero n chapter of Pfaj, 
Theta Kapp a meets every other 
Sunday in Continuing Education 
(CE 121) at 7pm. The next meeting 
will be held on January 23. 
For more information contact Mr. 
Hamlin in BA 110. 

Distributive Education Club Df 
America (DECA) meets Tues. , Wed . 
and Sundays. Dates were unavail- 
able at press time. 

For more information please call 
Susan Thompson at 641-0345. 

lllltrmOTiral Sporta NO infor- 
mation available. 



Earlv Childhood Club meets 1±u* 
third Thursday of each montJht; 
January 13, February 10, Marel* 
17, and April 14, from' 12:15 to 
1:15 in SC 113, 

For more information call 
Sue Haines at 439-8046 or stop tyy 
room SC 1 18. 

College Republican Club h oldq 
meetings in SS203 at 7 p.m. Call 
6 86-0970 for more, information 

Student Executive Occupational 
Therapy f SEOT) Club n ext meet*, 
ingis Jan. 24at 10:30a.m. inDH 1 1 , 

Colleffate Music Educators >y~-. 

tionai Conference (CMENCl m ep^g;- 
every other Tuesday at 1:30 p.m. in 
Pm. 110 to Humanities Bldg.? F £ 
more info. callBob Jones at 439-8 14£j 



CONTACT HI \< ll< OMItll! |<> 

ii avi: viii it mi i ii\<.s Lisn;i> /V '., 



'Writes' enhances 
ecological and 
environmenal 

awareness 
through annual 
festival 



Writes/ 

from front page 

The opening ceremonies begin 
at 9 a.m. followed by a seminar 
held by Florida authors Patricia 
Wickman and Karen Davis. 

An arts award and fashion show 
will run from 1 1:00 a.m. to noon, 
and then the focus will turn to 
environmental issues . Presented 
by under the title Environmental 
Soundings from 12:00 p.m. to 
12:30 p.m. Environmental Sound- 
ings will feature a series of local 





speakers on environmental issues 
such as endangered wildlife, beach 
erosion, growth management, 
Florida weather, South Florida's 
water supply and invasive exotics. 

Local bands will fill the day 
with tunes as visitors reflect on 
environmental issues that affect 
us daily. The final event, which 
takes place in the new auditorium, 
will be a panel discussion on the 
Florida Everglades. Featuring sev- 
eral local speakers including: 
Tilford Creel, Executive Director of 
South Florida Water Management; 
George Barley, Environmental Ac- 
tivist; Tom Weis, Executive Direc- 
tor of South Florida Clean Water 
Action; and Maggie Hurchalla, 
County Commissioner for Martin 
County. Hurchalla will be 
moderater. 

"Writes of Spring" is under- 
written by local restaurants and 
businesses to allow free access by 
students and the public. They 
also donate food and supplies. 

Anyone interested in volun- 
teering should contact Grace 
LaGrassoat 625-2479. The "Writes 
of Spring" is sure to entertain and 
give put you in touch with and an 
appreciation for South Florida's 
fragile environment. 




Schick Super Hoops, the 
exiting 3-on-3 basketball 
tournament that takes intra- 
mural college basketball to 
its highest level, is back for 
its tenth season on college 
campuses. Students from 
PBCC will begin the quest for 
the national title when the 
Schick Super Hoops Tourna- 
ment begins Jan. 24, 1994, 
at PBCC/South Campus. 

All participating schools 
conduct an on-campus 3-on- 
3 basketball tournament. 
Then, each winning campus 



team competes at one of 22 
regional tournaments against 
teams from over 50 schools. 
The top male and female com- 

§ete for one of four Schick 
uper Hoops Divisional 
Championships at a nearby 
NBA arena. The four male 
and female regional champi- 
ons then earn a trip to the 
Schick Super Hoops National 
Championship at an NBA 
arena. 

Winning teams receive 
plaques, Reebok athletic 
shoes, Schick Super Hoops 
T-shirts and NBA licensed 
merchandise produced by 
Starter. All participants at 
campus tournaments receive 
free samples of Schick ST and 
Schick Personal Touch Slim 
Razors. 

Schick Super Hoops is 
sponsered by Schick Razors 
and Blades, with support 
sponsorships by Reebok In- 
ternational and Starter 
Sportswear. 

For more information, con- 
tact Freddie Bennett at (407) 
367-4571. 




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this ad — THURSDAY 



Black Student Union prepares to 
celebrate Black History Month 

By CHRISTOPHER THURSTON 
StqffReporter 

BSU better known as the Black Student Union, is a national organization for 
black students. ButBSU is more thanablack organization, it'savehicleforyoung 
African Americans to learn more about their heritage. The leadership skills and 
knowledge gained in this club are enormous. The supervisor is Ms. Gwen 
Ferguson, a unique woman whom IVe had the pleasure of meeting. 

BSU has a host of events coming up in the month of February, which is Black 
History month. The theme for February is "Reclairnyour African American Roots 
in 1994." 

To celebrate Black History Month, BSU will hold a Historical Fair in the "little 
Theater" section of the Duncan Theater. There will be workshops on Feb. 2 1 , 22, 
24 and 25 from 12 noon to 2:30 p.m. The workshops will cover Aids Awareness, 
Drug abuse, Intercity Crime, and African American Roots and Culture. 

BSU is also having a Soul Food festival on Wednesday, Feb. 16. 
BSlTs Regional Conference will be held on Jan. 26 at Nova University. 

This is an organization I would recommend to anyone, and particularly to 
young black students. Catch the wave, and be there. 

Panther Park at 90% occupancy 

PPark/ 

from front page 

state to build student housing three years ago. PBCC inspected 

Tallahassee's housing for ideas before constructing Panther Park. Phase 

One of the student residence was opened August 1993 — Phase Two will 

open this February. The 160 four -bedroom units can house up to 640 

students. 

There has been some question as to the length of leases. 

During student orientation and on posters around the PBCC cam- 
pus, students are led to believe that four month semester leases are still 
available — but this is no longer the case, Leases are now only offered 
on a month to month, six month, 10 month and yearly basis according 
to Parks. 

Concerns brought to the attention of previous management included 
loud music and late-night partying. According to some students, they 
were promised by the former manager that a section would be set aside 
for quieter students. But since new management has moved in, every- 
thing must be renegotiated. 

Admittedly, and to be fair to Parks, she has inherited problems not of 
her making. So the next few months will determine whether Panther 
Park, under her management, will address the concerns of its residents, 
and not simply brush them off as in the past — as some residents have 
claimed. 

Another concern of some students is security. To ensure that the 
peace is maintained, two police officers currently reside in Phase One. 
They add their presence to the six p.m. to six a.m. security guard already 
on duty seven nights a week. Two additional officers have been offered 
housing in the Phase Two project. 

The goal of Panther Park, according to Johansen, is to offer the nicest, 
cleanest, safest and quietest environment possible for students. Jo- 
hansen also said that management, "will not put up with hoodlums, 
rowdy behavior or drug and alcohol abuse. If we have that type of 
behavior, we will ask them to leave." 




WII 
inmnnry 27 y 1994, 7 - 19 pan. 

$20.00 gei&ml public 

$15,00 PBCC students m& smpteyees 

Bree - DFMA mejsto - Student Dab. 

Call Mary for 2$$&tv#i<>&$ 439-8306. 



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In the line of fire — HiePhoto 

* •■ ■ 

James S. Brady, the p ress fto former president Ronald 
Regan, was an innoc<E=> n tM urina the assassination 
attempt made on R© aa nftunately for Brady/one of 



January 19, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 7 



Newly-passed Brady Bill faces strong opposition 



By GLEN FRIEDMAN 
Associate Editor 

JohnW Hinckley Jr. didn't even 
lift a finger when he attempted to 
assassinate former president Ronald 
Reagan in 1981. All he had to do 
was fold it. 

A split-second later, two bodies 
lay on the ground, a bullet lodged 
firmly in one of the victim's heads. It 
wasn't Reagan's. 

Several weeks after the shoot- 
ing, Reagan was back on his feet — 
but the other man would never walk 
again. 

Former press secretary James 
S. Brady has been confined to a 
wheelchair since the shooting for 
being at the wrong place at the 
wrong time. But his situation can- 
not be reversed by a mere apology. 
A gunshot is final. 

Brady, despite his injury, never 
gave up. He devoted all of his efforts 
toward initiating a bill which would 
control handgun sales nationwide. 
Hence, the Clinton Administration 
passed "The Brady Bill." It requires 



a five-day waiting period and a full 
background check before a gun pur- 
chase is possible. 

But the Bill, according to many, 
is worthless. It has prompted oppo- 
sition from many sides, primarily 
gunshop owners, who must also 
wait an additional five days to com- 
plete a sale. 

"Politicians are using the Brady 
Bill as a smokescreen because tiiey 
can't address the real problem, " said 
Mike Caruso, owner of the Delray 
Shooting Center. "Ask James Brady 
what his bill would have done for 
him. He (Hinckley) bought his gun 
six months before the shooting." 

According to the Florida Depart- 
ment of Law Enforcement (FDLE), a 
handgun is purchased every eight 
minutes in Florida. 

"Everyone has a gun," said 
Caruso. "Most people who come in 
here are terrifed of guns. But they're 
more scared that so many other 
people have guns." 

From Feb.. 1991 to Jan. 1993, a 
search of FDLE records revealed 



thatFloridaapproved 525,693 hand- 
gun sales. Only 13,455 applica- 
tions were rejected. The FDLE could 
not estimate the number of illegally 
owned guns in the state, however, 
the number is expected to be far 
higher. But the proliferation of guns 
in Florida doesn't scare L .A. Wood, a 
part-time student at PBCC Central 
Campus. 

T don't think the Brady Bill will 
take the guns out of the hands of the 
criminals, " she said. "But I stand by 
the second ammendment. It's not 
about whether they know how to 
use them or not.' They should take 
amanditory course onhowto handle 
and clean them." 

Although gun-related crimes 
continue to rise, Caruso claims that 
the best way to avoid being shot is to 
own and know how to use a gun. 

"People who practice shooting 
have less chance for a mishap," he 
said. "Those are the people who 
would have the best chance of mak- 
ing it through a shootout." 






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A painful memory... - 

Mrs. Coretta Scott King places flowers on Martin Luther King's Tombstone. Could the Brady Bill have 



File Photo 



jd<iwmiui.i.jii 



Pages 



the BEACHCOMBER January 19, 1994 



January 19, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 9 




Panthers beat up 
on the Midwest 

By ROBERT G. GERARD 
Photo Editor 

With pin-point passing and the ability to 
steal the ball and then control the defensive 
boards, the men's basketball team, the Pan- 
thers, met and defeated both opponents here 
from the Midwest. The teams traveled 1200- 
miles from Chicago and Wisconsin City to Palm 
Beach CC. Morton College and Mid-State Tech 
each lost two games to faster, more agile South- 
ern Conference teams. 

The McDonald Classic, played January 8 
and 9 at the PBCC Central gymnasium initiated 
conference play for 1994. In the first game on 
Friday night, Indian River (9-10) beat Morton 
by 20 points (87 - 67), then the PBCC Panthers 
trounced the Mid-State Tech Cougars 100-77. 
At the half Mid-Sate was down by eight, 48-40, 
and Fred Pollard of PBCC had already stolen 
the ball twice for points on stinging fast break 
lay-ups each time. He went on to be named the 
tournaments Most Valuable Player. 

Saturday night capped a solid weekend of 
basketball, matching the loser of the night 
before, Mid-State, who came to Florida leading 
the Wisconsin Technical Conference with an 
Impressive 15 wins and one loss against IRCC. 
The final was IRCC 97 and Mid-State 79. 

ThePanthers speed and ball handling abil- 
ity prevailed in the final game and Morton 
College lost, 115-97. Scott Pospichal, PBCC's 
head coach said he was very pleased with the 
double win, but said it was still a longway to the 
championship. 

The next Panther conference home game is 
Saturday, Jan. 22, 1994 against Indian River 
Community College. Even though they're below 
.500 for the season, Head Cocach Mike Leath- 
erwood issued a challenge in saying IRCC's 




Photo by Rob Gerard 



Wow! He's flying! 

Opposing players can only watch as Marquis Wright (20) 
goes up for a layup after a steal. 



current standings were deceiving and they could . 
beat anyone. 

The Panthers will play IRCC twice before 
the Conference Tournament, February 22-24. 




: v H f for Mdlnts;ORly||ill|i|s 



Lady Panthers 
are on the prowl 

Team has won eight of nine 



By JUSTIN KNAPFEL 
Sports Editor 

After a slight slump, the women's basket- 
ball team has rejuvenated itself. The Lady 
Panthers have raised their record to 13-5. 
Since November 24, they have won eight out 
of nine contests. 

Debra Williams continues to lead the way. 
In the last six games, Williams had been 
averaging over 23 points per game. Sha-Kim 
Wilson has also been playing well for Coach 
Booker and the Panthers, but she hurt her 
knee during the game against Indian River 
Community College on January 5. 

Tmhopingit'sjustasprain," said Booker. 
Booker hopes Wilson does not need surgery. 
"I think if she could play with a brace, she'll 
finish the year out," said Booker. 

On December 8, the Panthers went on the 
road to Valencia to win 71-59. Debra Williams 
found the net for 23 points, and Tasha McMil- 
lan scored 16. On Jan. 10, they travelled to 
South Florida Community College to play 
Okaloosa Walton. It was a close game, but the 
Panthers pulled away with the win, 68-65. 
Williams scored 24 points while Tammy Hud- 
son scored 14. Okaloosa Walton was last 
year's state champions. 

The Lady Panthers once again lost to 
Florida Community College- Jacksonville 66- 
54. Angie Stinson scored 12 points, and Wil- 
liams had 19 points. The ladies turned it on 
against Indian River, winning, 94-51. De- 
spite the 43-point margin, they did lose Wil- 
son to a knee injury. Williams hooped 24, and 
Brigitte Gittens collected 21 points. 

Since the injury to Wilson, Gittens has 
been starting. She has been doing well. Gittens 
scored 25 against Seminole CC in the 109-51 
victory. Williams had a season-high 32 points, 
and McMillan scored 23 points. On January 
9, the team defeated Miami/Dade-Kendall on 
the road with a score of 74-65. Williams scored 
23 points and McMillan had 14 points. 

The ladies are on the right track for the 
State Tournament which begins on February 
28. The next home games will be on Jan. 22, 
26 and 31. They will take on Indian River! 
Miami/Dade-Kendall and Broward. Game time 
is 5:45. 




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A tough act to follow 

Tennis coach predicts another strong season 



By JUSTIN KNAPFEL 
Sports Editor 

After an undefeated season last 
year, Coach Hamld Faquir is ex- 
pecting another excellent season 
of women's tennis. With eight ex- 
cellent players, the team may be 
heading for a state title. 

"I'll have a solid team. They're 
all good players," said Coach 
Faquir, "They're going to have to 
fight for their positions." 

Some of the excellent players 
returning are Natali Sunara, 
Clarissa Medeiros, Aredi and 
Athena Constantinou. Jennifer 
Logan will also be a great player on 
the team this season. 

Although she was very ill, 
Logan won the Rolex Tournament 
in the fall of '93. She defeated her 
teammate Sunara in the finals. 
Logan also won the doubles com- 
petition with Medeiros. "We play 
really good together," explained 
Logan. "We make a good team." 

While competing in Amateur 
Circuits, Logan has been in the top 
ten in the state, and also in the top 
twenty in the country. She had 



been to four Junior International 
Tournaments, and she won the 
Pepsi International in Jamaica. 

After graduating from Atlan- 
tic High School, Logan took a year 
off to play some tennis. She also 
coaches off and on, and plans to 
do more of that before she moves 
on to a four year University. Her 
choice of Universities to play for is 
Florida State. "I hope so," she 
said. During the summer she 
plans on playing in more tourna- 
ments to hopefully qualify for some 
of the big professional tourna- 
ments. 

Logan enjoys her teammates 
and her coach. She also likes their 
chances this season. "We get along 
good, we have a good team this 
year," said Logan, "The coach is 
tough, but he is good. We should 
do well." 

The women play their first 
match on February 8, at Lynn 
University. Their first conference 
match will be against Broward CC 
at home. Miami/Dade-North will 
be on campus Feb. 15. Both games 
begin at 2 p.m. 



MAJOR LEAGUERS VISIT CENTRAL CAMPUS FOR KIDS CAMP 




— Photo by Justin Knapfel 

L-R — Joe Grahe, Dante Bichette and Robby Thompson. 
Grahe, currently with the California Angels, pitched for the 
University of Miami Hurricanes headed by former coach Ron 
Fraser. Bichette is currently with the newly created 
expansion team Colorado Rockies. Thompson, also playing 
on the West Coast, is with the San Francisco Giants. 



Flag football team a pleasant surprise 




L-R Top — Earl Mayhew, Chris Erdman, Sam Hollis, Mike Cruikshank, 
and Chad Tredo. L-R Bottom — Dan Allegretti, Brian Stephenson, 
John Paulino and Bob Bashwiner. 



By JUSTIN KNAPFEL 
Sports Editor 

Over the holidays, the PBCC Eis- 
sey Campus flag football team com- 
peted in a national tournament in New 
Orleans, Louisiana. The team faired 
muchbetterthananyonehad expected. 

In the first round, PBCC defeated a 
tough University of Maryland team 18- 
13. Continuing their unbeaten string, 
they next defeated Steven F. Austin 
University 13-6. Just getting warmed 
up, the Eissey team showed absolutely 
no mercy to Tennessee State — they 
pounded them 34 ZIP. 

Unfortunately, PBCC next went up 
against some northern Floridians; they 
call themselves the Gators? at the Uni- 
versity of Florida. Only one college IVe 
ever heard of up that far and it starts 
with aT. Anyway, the Gators? won the 
game 19-7. Seems UF was the heavy? 
favorite to win the Sugar Bowl this year. 

Despite the loss, and a third place 
finish, the PBCC Eissey Flag Football 
team did themselves and their school 
proud! 



IMUSEUM 




gg January 15 to February 27 



IT -1* & S" «"' ■* ^ ■' 



ss 



ELLEN BROOKS: 

NATURE AS AR-rjfjcE 




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gives me another 
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Fast-pitch rule 
change 

prompts change 
of career for 

long-time coach 

By JUSTIN KNAPFEL 
Sports Editor 

Womens softball Coach John 
Andersonwillendhis 18year coach- 
ing career after this, his last, sea- 
son. Anderson decided that he 

"I believe we can 
win every game; 
that's my outlook 
every year" 

-Coach John Anderson 



would rather not coach fast-pitch 
softball when it will be required next 
season. 

"Since this is the last year of 
slow pitch softball, I hope that it 
could the best year we have ever 
had," said Anderson. 

Last season the softball team 
was 37-5, but this year the team has 
only three of thirteen players re- 
turning. Coach Anderson, though, 
is very optimistic about this season. 

"Wehavesomepretrygoodfresh- 
men coming in," assured Anderson. 
"I believe we can win every game; 
that's my outlook every year." 

Anderson's excited about his 
new players, but he doesn't like to 
single any one player out for special 
mention. 

"I don't think one certain player 
can win a ball game," Anderson ex- 
plained; "softball is a team sport and 
every player is as valuable as the 
next." 

As Anderson begins his last sea- 
son, he passes on some sage advice 
to his players. 

""If you're going to do some- 
thing, be the best at it." 

The ladies have their first games 
on February 1 1 and 12 in St. Peters- 
burg. Their first home game will be 
on February 22 against Miami/ 



■i i inn iininiiiHiii 1 win ■ mi'ill 



PagesilO the BEACHCOMBER January 1 9, 1 994 



January 19, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page* 1 1 






ENTERTAINMENT 

JLjf BEACHCOMBER JL. 



Tombstone bashers are making a mistake 




ByD.S.VLLERY 

Entertainment 

Editor 

A brief word be- 
fore I begin my cri- 
tique — I loathe the 
Western genre. I'm 
not a fan of John 
Wayne (aficionados 
forgive me), and the 
idea of watching 
dust-encrusted 
men riding on 
horseback and 
popping one an- 
other with antique 
revolvers in the 
middle of pan- 
oramic deserts 
leaves me with a 
bad taste in my 
mouth. 

There have, to 
this day, been only 
two exceptions to 
this rule — the 
powerful Clint 
Eastwood vehicle 
Pale Rider, and last 
year's phenomenal 
Unforgiven. 

But now we 
have Tombstone, a 
dramatized retell- 
ing of the events 
leading up to and 
subsequently fol- 
lowing the legendary "Gunfight at 
the O.K. Corral." 

I realize that the critics have 
had a field day trashing this film, 
but by my personal estimation, it 
simply isn't a bad movie. The film 
is fast-paced, well-acted, beauti- 
fully-shot, and engrossing from the 
opening frames. 

Kurt Russel is perfectly cast in 
the lead as retired Peace Officer 
Wyatt Earp who has arrived in the 
thriving town of Tombstone, Ari- 
zona along with his brothers Mor- 
gan (Bill Paxton) and Virgil (Sam 
Elliot) . They want to start a new life 
of prosperity and peace with their 











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— Photo by John Bramley 




U.S Marshal Wyatt Earp (Kurt Russell), shoots to kill In the movie Tomnstone, a reenacment of the 


famous gunfight at the O.K. Coral. 



brides. All three of these roles are 
managed with just the right mix of 
humanity and toughness. A viewer 
can easily see why these men 
spawned such a durable legend. 

Unfortunately, for them, a vio- 
lent gang of outlaws calling them- 
selves The Cowboys" — headed 
by Powers Booth and the incred- 
ible Michael Biehn (as psychotic 
quick-draw John Rtngo) — have 
staked a claim on that territory, 
and there is a rapid rise in the 
tension between the Earps and 
these foul miscreants who are sim- 
ply spoiling for a fight. 

Needless to say, one thing leads 



to another { I don't want to reveal 
anything here) , and soon the Earps 
are representing the law once 
again, this time assisted by their 
good friend Doc Holliday, played 
by Val Kilmer, who is dying of tu- 
berculosis . 

This performance is the high- 
light of the film. Kilmer not only 
does an fantastic representation of 
a sick man, but his believable ac- 
cent and cool, relaxed approach to 
the character allows him to steal 
every scene he inhabits. Doc is the 
most enjoyable western hero I've 
ever laid eyes on. 

After a violent opening se- 



quence the action 
is slowto develop, 
but once the fa- 
mous gunfight at 
the Corral occurs 
(wisely placed 
about mid -way 
through the film) 
the violence is 
just about non- 
stop. Make no 
mistake, this is 
an adult movie, 
and definitely the 
bloodiest western 
I've ever seen. 

There are 
flaws to be sure. 
Sam Elliot, 
though convinc- 
ing when he is on 
screen, is wasted 
in a role that is 
far too minor. 
And a few se- 
quences near the 
end of the film 
where Wyatt 
Earp's heroics 
cross the line 
from bold to 
cartoonish. One 
such scene is the 
shootout with 
Powers Booth — 
there are simply 
too many men fir- 
ing at Earp at one time for hirn not 
to have been hit. 

But Tombstone is saved by the 
fact that it sees through the action 
and violence and into the heart of its 
characters. I found that I really cared 
about Wyatt and his brothers, and by 
the end of the film, when the audience 
was cheering the heroes in their pur- 
suit of the wretched villains, I found 
myself cheering along with them. 

I have to be honest, and recom- 
mend that filmgoers ignore the mis- 
leading press about this film. If you 
want to see a really exciting movie, 
then Tombstone is your best choice. 



DON'T 
FORGET 



«©" *.™v 



Nothing sacred about Sacred Reich 

Paradise Lost is just that 




By CHRIS HARRIS 
FAU Corespondent 

Repeat after me, "Metal is dead!" 

Two perfect examples of this profound state- 
ment are new CD's by Sacred Reich, and Para- 
dise Lost. 

While these bands revel in the eighties, 
other metal bands are progressing into the 
future by incorporating more dimensions into 
their music. Unfortunately, these two particu- 
lar bands are trapped in a sound that's predict- 
able, boring, and repetitive. 

Sacred Reich's "Independent" CD is 11 
tracks of unimaginative garbage. Only one track 
even comes close to pleasing and that's a slow 
instrumental song called "If Only." If only the 
band developed that song into an entire album! 
For this band to flourish in the future, it has to 
change for our sake and its sake too (before it 
perishes). 

England's Paradise Lost fits into the same 
mould as Sacred Reich. However, Paradise Lost 
does seem more willing to experiment with new 
sounds as they have shown on a couple of 
tracks of their CD, "Icon." Yet again it's another 
instrumental track that shows wisdom on a 
song called "Deus Misereatur." Unbelievably, 
the song is less than two minutes long, but it 
shows more promise than the entire fifty min- 




L-R Dove McCbin, Jason Ralney, Phil Rind Wiley Ametr 



utes that is wasted on the CD. 

This is another example of two bands that 
have no talent despite the fact that there are 
hundreds of unsigned bands out there who 
deserve to be recognized by major labels. Two 
perfect examples are local bands Raped Ape 
and The Itch, both of whom have more talent 
on their latest EP's than either of these two 
major-label bands. w 

Vote with your dollars and send a messa ge 
to the major record labels that you're sick of 
mediocre music. Support your local bands 



FEATURES 

-«- BEACHCOMBER »**0r 




Kelly Dyer's day at the office begins by putting an 
iron mask on her face and steel blades on her feet 



— Photo by Justin Knapfel 
Bring on the biscuits (pucks)... 

Kelly Dyer still has the teeth to smile, unlike 

some goalies in the NHL. 

By JUSTIN KNAPFEL 
Sports Editor 

The West Palm Beach Blaze became a part 
history once again in minor league hockey. The 
Blaze acquired the third female goalie in the 
history of professional hockey. 

In the 92/93 season, the Tampa Bay Light- 
ning signed goalie Manon Rheaume, who now 
plays for the Atlanta Knights and the Knoxville 
Cherokees. This season there are two new fe- 
male faces, Erin Whiten of the Toledo Storm, 
and now Kelly Dyer of the West Palm Beach 
Blaze. 

The Blaze acquired Dyer to help. Scott 
Hopkins in goal due to the injuries to starting 
goalies Todd Bojcun and Mike Gregorio. Dyer 
did play one game with the Jacksonville Bullets 
earlier this season. 

Playing with the guys is nothing new to 
Dyer. Growing up in Massachussets, she used 
to" play "with her older brother.and his, friends. 
"When they needed a goalie, they threw me in 



the net, and I liked it," explained Dyer. 

Dyer started out figure skating, but she 
always enjoyed hockey. "Hockey looked more 
exciting to me," said Dyer. She hung up her 
figure skates for hockey skates when her father 
found a woman's league. Later on she would 
play with the guys because they needed a goalie 
and they discovered she was good at guarding 
the net. 

In her first two years of hockey she played 
forward, she then played a little defense, and 
went back into the goal. "I think it's (playing all 
of the positions) really important to learning 
the fundamentals of the game," she explained. 

Once she started high school she had no 
problem with being on the school's team be- 
cause she had played with most of the guys for 
about ten years from the other leagues. "It was 
like they were my brothers, it was kind of nice," 
said Dyer. 

Dyer attended Northeastern University in 
Boston, receiving two degrees, one in Business 
Management, and one in Marketing. In her junior 
and senior years, the women's team were the 
Eastern College Athletic Conference champions. 

On January 7, at Daytona Beach, Dyer played 
her first game for the Blaze in the third period, 
stopping all seven shots. The next night, in her 
home debut in front of 3,368 supportive fans, she 
saved 16 out of 18 shots. 

Dyer is currently in the trials for Team USA for 
the 1998 Olympics and is expected to make the 
squad. She feels that when Phil Espisito of Tampa 
Bay drafted Manon Rheaume, that it opened the 
gateway for the 3,000 women inhockey. She agrees 
that it .will .be .hawj, for, women to break into any 
positions other than goalie becauseof the contajet," 



"I wouldn't want to take those hits, andldon'tknow 
many women that would," explained Dyer. 

She is very excited that she has the opportunity 
to be a part of the Blaze. The defense is excellent, 
they're big and strong. It's just a classy organiza- 
tion," said Dyer. "I just want to be wherever IVe got 
the most opportunity to play, and right now it is 
here," she explained, 




... t „..., ... — Photo by Justin Knapfel 

pyer pldyin' with the big boys... 



Center for Personalized Instruction offers a 
variety of services with the personal touch 

Don't give up, a little help is all you may need. 




By LOVRA LAFAYETTE 
Stcfjff Reporter 

Ever feel like you're just not getting It? 
Hesitant to start college-level math classes? 
Or is reading your problem? Do you need 
to review for the SAT or CLAST? or would 
just a little more help for those difficult 
classes be welcome? Need a little flexibility 
In your schedule? Then the Center for 
Personalized Instruction (CPI) is the place 
for you! 

The CPI labs offer a variety of educa- 
tional opportunities for day and evening 
students. Any student can register for 
personalized Instruction, and the registra- 
tion fee is a nominal $3 per semester. 

But what exactly does CPI have to offer? 
According to Eileen Holden, who heads the 
CPI department, the program has four func- 
tions; 1) CPI offers developmental (prep) 
courses in reading, English, math and En- 
glish for Speakers of Other Languages 
(ESOL) . These courses are designed to help 
students develop the basic skills needed 
before proceeding to college-level courses. 
2) CPI offers instruction in selected credit 






<NO MATTER HOW HAKD I TRY, 
MY GRABES REMAIN LOW!' 

Millions of people have ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDERS 

or LEARNING DISABILITIES that interfere with 

learning & achievement. 

— For an evaluation, please call— . 

MYLES L COOLEY, PH.D., ABPP 
Licensed Psychologist #PY0002839 

4360 Northlake Blvd., Suite 210 
Palm Beach Gardens, FL 3341 



courses on a "to be arranged" sched- 
ule. This service applies only to 
selected courses. 3) CPI offers aca- 
demic support for students in the 
form of tutors (faculty and peer 
tutors), the computer lab, review 
materials for standardized tests 
such as the SAT, ACT, and CLAST, 
and other resources. All students 
have access to these services by 
paying the registration fee. 
4) CPI offers ESOL. This program 
offers instruction and practice in 
speaking, listening, reading and 
writing in English. These courses 
are specifically designed for those 
who want to improve their English 
language skills. 

Each developmental or college 
preparatory course meets for six 
hours per week including lecture 
and lab. Each course may earn 
four institutional credits that count 
toward full-time student status, 
financial aid, etc., but does not 
count toward a degree. 

Over 2300 students used the 
CPI labs this past fall, and CPI is 
offered year round. This winter, the 
computer and reading labs are open 
Saturdays in addition to weekday/ 
evening hours. Hours vary. Call 
ahead for schedule. 

The computer lab is located at 
CP101 phone 439-8223; reading 
lab is CP105 phone 439-8225, and 
the math lab is CP200 phone 439- 
8048. 

To learn more about the pro- 



SUBS 

MARINATED STEAKS 




10 THINGS 
I LIKE 

BESIDES SUBS 

• Auto Racing 

• Babies 

• Baseball 

• Books 

• Cats 

• Country Music 

• Country Music (again) 

• Horse Racing 

• Motorcycles (Harleys) 

• My Mom 

• Subs (whoops) 

• Walking 

... or my name's not 



%^\a€^ 



P.5. Did I mention subs? 



fliWTi.gSWMTi ICifH 



I II HilrflMlIM ll I 



Page 12 the BEACHCOMBER January 19, 1994 



BEACHCOMBER 



/ THE QUESTION: 

I "How has Martin Luther King's'Dream' for 
1 equality affected yot/r life?" 

1 FOR THE ANSWER 



See pages 6 & 7 



fiorida Community 
" Tress Association 




TIWP P>IA€i/$TATi OIF FIORIPA 



TOURETTES SYNDROME: The Real Story 

A first-person account of its affects on 
the sufferer and its affects on family, 
friends and strangers — See Page 11 



STRANGE 



BYD.S.ULLERY 




THE Crossword 



Bad decisions in history 



ACROSS 
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5 Large amount 
10 Rude building 

14 Ready for 
publication 

15 Group of wives 

16 Weary 

17 Burrowing 
animal 

1 8 State a view 

19 Otherwise 

20 Equip 
22 Tilted 

24 Deep hole 

25 Memento 

26 Free from 
bondage 

30 Carved 

34 Ancient 

35 Liquid meas. 

36 Make very 
happy 

37 "— be seeing 
you" 

38 Charged with a 
gas 

41 Massage 

42 Helicoptor blade 

44 Brooch 

45 Soft drink 

46 Rx directions 
48 Fireworks item 
50 Thin materia! 

52 Murray or West 

53 Shaded walk 
56 Kind of paste-up 

art work 

60 Desert sight 

61 Arabian ruler 

63 Group of sailors 

64 Volcanic peak 

65 Non-com 

66 Employ 

67 Paste shut 

68 Grooved face of 
a tire 

69 Sweet potatoes 



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All niqMts Reserved 



7 Jackie's 
husband 

8 Thickheaded 

9 Scents 

10 Sign painter's 
equipment 

1 1 Sword handle 

12 Gaelic 

1 3 Heroic action 
21 Manner 
23 Felt sick 

25 Turn for the 
worse 

26 Scot, estate 



ANSWERS 




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anaa nnciran nann 

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DECEMBER 8. PTJZZT ,F, 



55 Siam visitor 

56 Large: pref. 

57 Opera solo 

58 Disease 








Volume 54 Number 11 PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE ♦ LAKE WORTH, FLORIDA 



Februarv 2. 1 994 



Ellen Brooks: 'Nature as Artifice 9 

PBGC Museum also presents 
Ansel Adams' stark landscapes 



By K. DANIEL PRUSSMANN 
and AREDI CONSTANTINOU 
Staff Reporters 

To some, photography may 
seem as simple as pressing a 
button on a camera. In fact, I 
thought this way myself until 
recently. But after a visit to 
PBCC's 
Museum of 
Art in 
downtown 
Lake Worth, 
it seems 
that a 
picture 
actually can 
paint a 
thousand 
words, that 
is, if the 
photogra- 



...Gregory Crendson dis- 
plays prints that illustrate ex- 
treme, very synthetic char- 
acteristics. Apparently, he 
spends too many hours in his 
studio concocting these pre- 
posterous spectacles. 



pher is 

Ellen Brooks or Ansel Adams. 

Ellen Brooks is not jtist a pho- 
tographer. She also makes a state- 
ment about our culture and the 
society in which we live through her 
pictures. Her latest work in Nature 
asArtifice, anew exhibit atthePBCC 
Museum, explores a new realm of 
photography. She has devised a 
system in which a simple photo- 



graph is re-photographed through a 
special screen that generalizes the 
subject. Although this technique 
doesn't distort the subject, it does 
break the picture up into a series of 
small dots creating an impression- 
istic look. 

This technique allows Brooks to 
remove her 
pictures 
from na- 
ture. She 
feels that 
our society 
is too over- 
whelmed 
by artificial 
nature 
such as golf 
courses, 
fish tanks 
and bonsai 
trees as op- 
posed to Mother Nature's creations. 
By removing her subject from its 
true form, yet in the process creat- 
ing something that is breathtak- 
ingly beautiful, she expresses our 
preference formanufacturedbeauty 
over natural beauty. 

Please see/Museum 
page 5 



PBGC student, Evann Lee, airs classic 
rock on 98.7 WKGR — The Gator 

Balancing college and work 
is difficult — but rewarding 

By DOUG SHVPE 

Staff Reporter/North Campus 

Attending school full time and working is a difficult task for anyone. But 
balancing the demands of professors at school and supervisors at work is 
nothing new to radio personality Evann Lee, who brings alive the sounds of 
classic rock on 98.7 WKGR — The Gator. 

Evann Lee Slavek, who was born in Virginia, has never lived anywhere 
other than West Palm Beach for more than three years. Her father, a military 
man, moved often around the United States and Europe. While living in 
Europe as a child, Evann Lee experienced very few American programs. 

"We only got Sesame Street and Casey Casum's Top 40, and I thought 
he was cool," Lee said. 

Years later, Lee was back in the United States and at "loose ends." She 
began to ask around about broadcasting as a career. It seem her interest had 
been sparked as a child. Although people told her that she would never be 
a female radio broadcaster in a medium sized market, such as West Palm 
Beach, she now proves them wrong Monday through Friday from 3:00 to 
7:00 p.m. Lee's success came as a result of her personal characteristics. 

"Self determination. And, if at first you don't succeed, try again. No 
screw-up is too great; so pick yourself up; dust yourself off — it was't that 
bad — and keep going. Self determination. That's it!" 

Lee, if you hadn't already guessed, is attending PBCC's Edward M. 
Eissey Campus to get the degree that she never got. If she is not in the studio 
or introducing bands at clubs or events like the South Florida Fair, she is 
busy studying. Lee is determined to get the most out of college, so if she does 
not feel challenged in a course she will ask the instructor to give her more 
to do, and the instructors are happy to accommodate her. 

"The standards here are exacting, and I've been really lucky to run into 

Please see/WKGR 
page 3 




Another double-digit game... 

.Debra Williams towers over IRCC opponents 



- Photo by Rob Gerard 



Lacty Panthers trounce Indian River CC 



By DAVID P. McDERMOTT 
StaLff Reporter 

PBCC Lady Panthers con- 
tinued to move at fast-break 
jace as they demolished the 
^ady Pioneers ( 2-21 ) of Indian 
River Community College 100- 
44 in front of a good size home 
crowd for SGAPack the Gym II 
on Jan. 22. 

According to Coach San- 
dra Booker, the Lady Panthers 
(17-5, 6-0} actually started a 
little sloppy, but then turned it 
up a notch. 

Debra Williams once again 
led the way with 21 points, six 
steals and six rebounds. In all, 
the Lady Panthers had sixplay- 
ers in double figures, includ- 



ing 17 points by Natalie Rich- 
ardson. 

Not only, did PBCC's high 
octane offense do well, but Is 
defense held IRCC inastrangle- 
hold by causing 17 turnovers 
and 20 steals — the women 
only gave up 17 second half 
points! PBCC's women are so 
complete ateamthatit's tough 
to imagine anybody slowing 
them down. - 

Coach Booker acknowl- 
edged that the team's goal is to 
go undefeated after the break, 
Withjust one month left in the 
regular season, the Lady Pan- 
thers goal looks realistic, espe- 
cially if they keep up their cur- 
rent level of play. 



Page 2 ffie BEACHCOMBER February 2, 1994 



February 2, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 3 



S 



s 



A 



Editorial 



BEACHCOMBER 



No money. No classes 

Forty-eight hour registration unfair 




By GLEN GAREAU 
Stqff Reporter 

Deadline for payment of class 
registrationfees at PBCC Is currently 
48 hours. No payment. No classes. 

If you are fortunate enough to 
have financial aid or a scholarship, 
then payment of fees are put on hold 
until your money arrives. 
Unfortunatley, for most of the fifteen 
thousand plus students attending 
PBCC this is not the case. 

The average age of a student at 
PBCC is 27, many of whom are work- 
ing students paying for part or all of 
their education. Paying within 48 
hours of registration has placed me 
in a hardship situation more than 
once. For example, ayear ago I regis- 
tered for classes knowing that I could 
not pay for them within the 48 hour 
time period. Therefore, I had to re- 
register every two days until I earned 
enough money to pay for the classes, 
although they weren't scheduled to 
begin for several weeks. 

At the end of the winter term, 
currently enrolled students can reg- 
ister for both s umm er and fall term 
classes. Why should students be 
required to pay for classes within 48 
hours when they won't begin for 
three months? Administrators ex- 
plain that students register for more 
classes than theyintend to take, and 
then drop them at the last minute. I 
realty don't feel that 48 hours is the 
answer. 

Somecurrenuy enrolled students 
wait until the last minute to register 
for the winter term because they are 
short of money. 

"I couldntregteterforwinter term 
until the last week of registration 
because I didn't have the money. 
Consequently, I didn't get all the 
classes I wanted" student Kevin 
Gareau said. Some students must 
register early in order to get popular 
classes with limited room and avail- 
ability. So, PBCC's 48 hour policy is 
an unnecessary hardship for stu- 
dents who pay for part or all of their 



education. 

Broward Community College has 
taken a middle-of-the-road approach 
to the payment of student fees. Mary 
Fischer, the registration coordinator 
of BCC's north campus said, "We try 
to strike a balance between the stu- 
dents and the administration." 

For example, BCC's winter regis- 
tration begins Oct. 26, almost a 
month before PBCC. A BCC student 
registering between Oct. 26 and Nov. 
1 is not required to pay for classes 
until Dec. 6. This allows students 
almost five weeks breathing room, 
while ensuring that fees are paid a 
month before classes begin. This 
system ensures that students won't 
monopolize classes, and those regis- 
tering late will have classes to select 
from one month prior to the start of 
the term. Also, this is fair to the 
administration for they know who 
will be in what classes and that fees 
will be paid within a reasonable time. 
This policy also shortens lines for 
payment and registration. To ensure 
that students do not register for 
classes that they do not intend to 
take, the computers at BCC will not 
allow a student to register for more 
than one class in the same section. 

Indian River Community College 
takes a very liberal approach. 

"Student fees are due on or be- 
fore the last day of registration re- 
gardless of when a student regis- 
ters," Dean, Al Little explained. 

But I don't feel this policy is fair 
either. Students can certainly take 
advantage of this system, and regis- 
ter for more classes than they intend 
to take. Also, this system creates an 
extremely busy drop/add week. 

Mr. Scott MacLachlan, Dean of 
Student Services at PBCC Central 
Campus, said that PBCC is consid- 
ering an alternative to the 48 hour 
registration policy. But if there is a 
policy change, it will probably come 
"48" hours too late for currently en- 
rolled PBCC students. 



Get on the Fast Track at 
Florida Atlantic University! 



Weekend 
Bachelor of 
Business 
Administration 



*NT/o 



Classes Meet on Saturdays 
• AACSB Accredited • 

* Financial Aid Available • 



Find out if you qualify today! 

Call Peter Goumas, Program Coordinator, 

at (407) 367-2709. 



Editor/Layout 
Associate Editor/Layout 
Sports Editor 
Entertainment Editor 
Photography Editor 
Advertising Manager 



the BEACHCOM BER 

— 1 993 — 

Florida Community College Press Association 

Award Winners 

— George P. Reis — 

First place Best Arts Review & 

Second place In-depth Reporting. 

— Robert G. Gerard — 

Third place Sports Photo. 

— Beachcomber — 

Third place Design/Layout. 



Mike Mitseff 

Glen Friedman 

JustinKnapfel 

D.S. Ullery 

Robert Gerard 

Kenneth (Dan) Prussman 



Contributing Reporters 

Troy Crago, K. Daniel Prussman, Christopher Thurston, 
Stacey Skinner, Mike Giamatt, Daniel Moon, JDavid P. McDermott 
Loura Lafayette, Doug Shupe, Stephanie Tookes and Chris Harris 

Opinions expressed In the Beachcomber do not necessarily reflect 
the views of the Beachcomber or Palm Beach Community College. 
Letters to the Editor must be signed. 



Palm Beach Community College 

BEACHCOMBER 

4200 Congress Avenue 

Lake Worth, FL 3346 1 -4796 

(407) 439-8064 Fax (407) 439-8210 





Dr. Edward Eissey 
President/Publisher 



Ms. Vickl Scheurer 
Faculty Adviser 



Lee strives for 
perfection, whether at 
school or at work 

WKGR/ 

from front page 

wonderful professors," Lee said. 

As for her job, Lee enjoys the freedom that she 
is allowed. "It's creative! Nobody tells me what to 
say or how to say it." 

Lee describes her on-the-air as something 
akin to school work. 

"Like studying, I'm given an outline, and I 
know what the outline is, but I fill in all the 
details." 

Lee explained that what she liked best about 
her job is communicating with people in the 
community, and also the challenge that she faces 
everyday when a new listener tunes in. 



"We're real people; we like to make friends 
with people who call us. It's a lot of fun in terms 
of developing personal relationships, but it's also 
customer service. What they get from me is free, 
and I have to convince them that my product is 
better that anyone else's because they're not 
paying for it. If they don't like what I have to say 
or the music that I'm playing, or how I'm present- 
ing it, then all they have to do is punch a button. 
That makes it much harder," Lee explained. 

Lee recommends internships for anyone who 
is interested in broadcasting. It is an extremely 
competitive tield and the best way to get your foot 
in the door is to work for free to gain valuable, 
practical experience. 

"Wait tables at night and intern during the 
day. That's what I did. It can be done, and just 
learn everything you can," said Lee. 

Besides her school work and job, Lee is 
looking forward to moderating the Eissey Cam- 
pus "Focus" series on "Sex, Drugs, and Rock & 
Roll: Legalizing Our Vices," which takes place on 
Wednesday, Feb. 1 6, from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m. in the 
learning Resource Center. The Focus discussion 



will also include panelists: Federal Judge, James 
Paine; Palm Beach County Health Department 
Director, Jean Malecki; Palm Beach County 
Sheriffs Department Narcotics Division Captain, 
Jack Maxwell; West Palm Beach Mayor, Nancy 
Graham; Attorney, Mitchell Beers; American Civil 
Liberties Union Representative, Roger Corman; 
and St. Peter's Catholic Church Director of Chris- 
tian Education, Martha Scholar. 

All students are welcome and encouraged to 
attend. Cost is one dollar for PBCC students and 
faculty, and three dollars for the general public. 

The Focus series which began in the fall of 
1992, was started by a group of faculty at Eissey 
Campus: Gladys Duckle, Dr. Barry Russal, Sean 
Smith and Jeff Peters. 

Moderating the focus panel is an added re- 
sponsibility to Evann Lee's already busy schedule. 
She believes in hard work and is just as deter ^ 
mined to excel in college as she does on-the-air. 

"I want everything to be. perfect. It's like 
making less than an "A" in class, it's not a possi- 
bility. I don't allow it to happen, it happened once, 
trigonometry; but that's a different story. 



FORMER MEMBER OF PARLIA- 
MENT (GREAT BRITAIN), JOHN 
BROWN, WILL LECTURE ON THE 
BRITISH PARLIAMENT AND CUR- 
RENT POLITICAL ISSUES IN PRO- 
FESSOR DAN O'CONNEUS COM- 
PARATIVE GOVERNMENTS CLASS 
IN ROOM SS203, THURSDAY, FEB. 3 
AT 10:30 A.M. 

ANYONE WISHING TO ATTEND 
KEEP IN MIND SEATING IS 
SCARCE, SO GET THERE EARLY! 



60TTA "KNOWS" FOR NEWS? CALL 439-8Q64 

CROWD 
tHt BEACHCOMBER 





&ALM BEACH ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE 



a 



PAID internships are available in all phases of production, 
writing etc.; learn from professionals; have fun and make 
some money too! Contact Judy DiEdwardo at 659-0210. 




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This AHv*»rti«pm*»nt Not PaiH For With Public Funds. 



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iwmisijam i niiHrtiim»iiii 



Page 4 



the BEACHCOMBER February 2, 1994 



February 2, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 5 



NewS 



BEACHCOMBER' 



Get involved, join the 
Inter-Club Council and 
help set policy for PBGC 

All students are Invited 




By STACEY SKINNER 
Staff Reporter 

Order, order! This meeting will come to order. So, 
did you attend last week's Inter-club council (ICC) 
meeting? No, you say? Well, you've come to the right 
article. Last week was the first of many meetings to 
be held on Thursday beginning at 1:30 p.m. in the 
SAC lounge. Because of the time change, not many 
people were aware that the meeting was being held, 
in fact, a pretty good ping-pong game had to be 
interrupted. But it is official, ICC meetings have 
been moved to 1:30 p.m. in the SAC lounge, not the 
cafeteria. 

Many subjects were discussed at the last meet- 
ing, including SGA President Ken Marion's "Pack the 
Gym" idea. At the meeting Marion told us some of the 
prizes that were going to be given away, and we were 
all, needless to say, very impressed. The prizes 
included: Dinner for two, and a copy of Michael 
Jordan's book. Present at the meeting was the Black 
Student Union club (BSU) who mentioned that they 
will be holding a fundraiser Feb. 21, 22, 24 and 25, 
to raise money for workshops they will be having in 
the Duncan Theater during Black History Month in 
February. 

The workshops include: Aids Awareness, Drug 
and Alcohol Abuse, Inner-city Crimes, and Cultural 
Heritage. BSU is selling tickets now for $ 1 to help 
raise money, and the prizes are: two midnight parties 
aboard Discovery Cruise for first place; a sony AM/ 
FM clock radio for second place; and $20 cash for 
third place. Winners will be announced at the Soul 
Food Festival Feb. 23 in the SAC lounge, you need 
not be present to win. So lend a helping hand, if a 
BSU representative asks you to help out, buy a ticket 
it's for a good cause. 



BSU also mentioned that a video conference 
entitled "Beyond the Dream VI: A Celebration of 
Black History — Blacks in Politics — A Struggle 
for Inclusion," will be shown Feb. 2 in Allied 
Health 101 from 1 to 3 p.m. According to BSU 
representative, Julian Bond, this conference 
has three major program segments: 

1) "Current Political Power and Challenges," 
will explore the power of the Congressional 
Black and Hispanic Caucuses, African-Ameri- 
can governors and mayors, Asians and Native 
Americans. It will also examine minority poli- 
tics from the traditional Democratic machine to 
Black conservatives. 

2) "Profiles in Black Politics," will profile 
several prominent political figures 

3) Coalition Building," will examine how 
African-Americans can best form coalitions with 
other groups. 

Opportunities to interact with the panelists 
via telephone will be available. Additional an- 
nouncements will be made during the month of 
February. 

Also present was Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) and 
they announced that for a week before 
Valentine's Day they will be hosting a flower 
sale where you can buy flowers for your sweet- 
heart for only $1. Who could ask for a better 
deal? PTK will be taking orders the week before, 
as well as, Valentines Day, so get in good with 
your significant other, buy a flower for a dollar. 

Near the end of the meeting, a young lady by 
the name of Ann Battles made a proposal asking 
for help to go on a trip to Washington to attend 
a seminar entitled "Women As Leaders , " in which 
she will attend discussions and workshops deal- 
ing with womens issues. Battles informed those 
present that she will be representing PBCC and 
Sears/Roebuck Co., and that if she is one of the 
200 women accepted, she will be bringing back 
very worthwhile information. After much de- 
bate and discussion the proposal was passed 
with a majority vote. 

Well, as you can see, if you missed the last 
meeting you missed a lot. Get involved, come to 
the ICC meetings and share an idea. See you 
this Thursday at 1:30! 



FORMOSEW^ 



The Harry S. Truman Foundation 
offers students $30,000 in scholarships 

Public Service students only, need apply 



By STACEY SKINNER 
Staff Reporter 

The Harry S. Truman Schol- 
arship Foundation was estab- 
lished by Congress in 1975 as an 
official federal me- 
morial to honor -^^-b^—-.™ 
our thirty- third 
president. The 
Foundation rec- 
ognizes President 
Truman's contri- 
butions to the na- 
tion, his commit- 
ment to public 
service, and his 
interest in educa- 
tion. The Foun- 
dation awards 
scholarships to college students 
who have outstanding leadership 
potential, who plan to pursue 
careers in government, or, else- 
where in public service, and wish 



benefit all participants — not 
solely those selected as Truman 
Scholars. It encourages candi- 
dates to reflect on the needs of 
society they want to address pro- 



his/her class. A United States 
citizen or, in the case of nomi- 
nees from American Samoa or 
the Commonwealth of the North- 
ern Mariana Islands, a United 
States national is required. 

In 1994 up to 85 Truman 
Scholarships will be awarded on 
the basis of merit to junior -level 
students at four -year colleges 
and universities and to sopho- 
more-level students at two year 
colleges. A Truman Scholarship 
provides up 



Previously published information in the 
Beachcomber concerning the Harry S. 
Truman Scholarship was incorrect. Nomi- 
nees must be U.S. citizens, not as it was 
reported, international students. We are 
sorry for any inconvenience this has caused. 



fessionally, to refine career goals 
and objectives, and to plan for 
graduate study. 

Each nominee for the schol- 



pursuing a 



r arship must be, one, a full time 

to attend graduate school to help student and a junior at a four- 
prepare for their careers. Truman year Institution 
Scholars participate in leader- 
ship development programs and 
have special opportunities for in- 
ternships and employment with 
the federal government. 

The nomination and selection 
process has been designed -to 



bachelor's degree during the 
1993-94 academic year. And, two, 
a sophomore at a two-year insti- 
tution during the 1993-94 aca- 
demic year. — enrolled in an ac- 
credited institution of higher edu- 
cation and in the upper quarter of 



to $30,000! 
Do you think 
you have 
what it takes 
to win this 
scholarship? 
You'll never 
know until 
you try, so 
pick up an 
application 
and mail it 
now. The 
deadline is FEBRUARY 25, 1994. 
For applications and materi- 
als contact: 

Central Campus: ScottMacLachlan 
439-8378; 

Eissey Campus: Idell McLaughlin 
625-2527; 



South Campus: 
367-4525; 



Kim Niemczyk 



Belle Glades Campus; Sue Lott 
992-6151. 



Central Ca mpus Meetings 



StndentResourceCounciKSRC) 

meets every Thursday at 5 p.m. in 
the cafeteria. For more information 
please contact Carrol Razza at 
439-8090 . INF q. NOT UPDATED 

PBCCPfavacs/TheatjeClub meets 
every other Thursday at 10:10 a.m. 
in the Duncan Theatre/ west en- 
trance. Next meeting is scheduled 
for Jan. 20. 

Please contactMrs. Sunny Meyer 
at 437-8139 for more infonnation. 

Inter Club Council KCC) 

Meetings are held every Thursday at 
1:30 p.m. in the SAC LOUNGE, all 
students are invited to participate, 

Students for International Un- 
derstanding f SIU) club meets eveiy 
Wednesday at 3:00 p.m. in the caf- 
eteria. Please contact Danita Kurte 
at 439-8233 for more information. 



The Computer Club/DPMA is 

interested in new members, they 
meet the third Saturday of each 
month at 10 a.m. Please contact 
Mary Kelly McWaters for location at 
439-8306. 



Black Student Union fBSUI 

meets every Wednesday at 1:30 SS 
103. For more information con- 
tact Mrs. Gwen Ferguson at 439- 
8327. 



Delta Qmicron chapter of Phi 
Theta Kapp a meets every other 
Sunday in Continuing Education 
(CE 121) at 7pm. The next meeting 
will be held on January 23. 
For more information contact Mr. 
Hamlin in BA 110. 

Distributive Education Club of 
America (DECAl meets Tues. , Wed. 
and Sundays. Dates were unavail- 
able at press time. 

For more infonnation please call 
.Susan Thompson at 641-0345. 

Intramura l Sport? NO infor- 
mation available. 



Early Childhood Club meets the 
third Thursday of each month; 
January 13, February 10, March 
17, and April 14, from 12:15 to 
1:15 in SC 113. 

For more information call 
Sue Haines at 439-8046 or stop by 
roomSC 118. 

College Republican Club h nlris 
meetings in SS203 at 7 p.m. Call 
686-0970 for more information. 

Student Executive Occupational 
Therapy fSEQT) Club nwt mee t- 
IngisJan, 24at 10:30 anxinDH 101. 



Col legiate Music E duca tors Na- 
tional Co nference f CMENf^rn^g 
every other Tuesday at 1:30 p.m. in 
Rm. 110 in Humanities Bldg.? For 
moreinfo, call Bob Jones at. 439-8142. 









Palm Beach Community College Board of 
Trustees Honors teachers for excellence 



File photo 
PBCC's 1994 Teachers of Excellence. 

L-R, Diana Kilpatrick, Joanne Connolly, 
Kathleen Asher and John Phillips, 

ByMEKEGIAMATT 
Staff Reporter 

The PBCC District Board of Trustees recog- 
nized four PBCC instructors for teaching excel- 
lence in their fields. 



The awards were given at the January meet- 
ing of the DBTby Dr. Patricia Dyer, Vice President 
of Academic Affairs. 

Honored with plaques for excellence in teach- 
ing were John Phillips, Glades Campus Science 
Department; Joanna Connolly, South Campus 
Communications Department; Kathleen Asher, 
Central Campus Communications Department; 
and Diana Kilpatrick, Eissey Campus Communi- 
cations Department. 

"I am honored to represent this faculty ... I 
love to teach ... the subject I teach is very impor- 
tant to students ... I have a mission ... I love 
everthing surrounding education," Asher said. 

Kilpatrick explained a bit about her innova- 
tive approach to freshman communications that 
earned accolades from the board. 



"I started from scratch with my program, and 
introduced computers into the creative process. 
First-time freshman communications students 
see all the computers and think they are in the 
wrong class. It's been delightful to be allowed the 
flexibility that I've enjoyed from the PBCC admin- 
istration," Kilpatrick explained. 

In other matters, Dr. Patricia Dyer introduced 
John H. Townsend Chairman of the International 
Education Committee, who gave his report to the 
board on the status of international education at 
PBCC. 

Highlights included not only a summary of 

Please see Board/ 
page 1 1 



Celebrating nature through photography 

Ellen Brooks & Ansel Adams 



Museum/ 

from front page 

With advanced improvements in technology, natural beauty, Brooks' contends, has 
become a thing of the past. Brooks* photos instill the idea that natural beauty is taken for 
granted. 

Ansel Adams, another renowned photographer whose work can be seen at the PBCC 
Museum, takes quite a different approach with his photographs. His pictures insist that 
there is still a vast appreciation for Mother Nature's creations. This particular exhibit 
features shots taken in the dead of winter. His style, using silver gelatin, black and white 
prints and meticulous focus, enhances the seemingly lifeless quality of his subjects. 

Taking Brooks' ideas about artificial nature a tad over the edge, Gregory Crendson 
displays prints that illustrate extreme, very synthetic characteristics, Apparently, he 
spends too many hours in his studio concocting these preposterous spectacles. He should 
leave his studio once in a while and take a look at the real world. Perhaps then, he will 
produce something worth viewing. 

Whether you are a person who enjoys artificial or natural beauty, you should take a look 
at these photos. You'll learn to appreciate the beauty of simplicity and the world around you, 
and, at the same time, admire the art of photography. 




ELLEN BROOKS: 

Untitled Southwest 1987 
Cibachrome 99" x 123" 



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Page 6 



the BEACHCOMBER February 2, 1 994 



February 2, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 7 




BEACJi|ER 





Free at last? 



-File Photo 



Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was the inspirational leader of the Civil-rights movement. 
His goal for equality was opposed by many in the mid-20th century. There were 
several attempts on King's life, before his assasination in 1968. His house was 
bombed 10 years earlier, but he and his family escaped injury. Some believe there 
was a conspiracy to kill King, and that the only gunman convicted did not act alone. 



OE.I3E 



The long, bumpy rol is coming to an end 



BY GLEN FRIEDMAN 
ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

She took a stand by sitting down. 

Alabama resident Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a 
white male passenger on a bus in 1955. She was promptly 
arrested. But to the predominantly white society, the seat on the 
bus was not the real issue. The only crime Parks committed was 
having been born with a dark-colored skin. 

The Rosa Parks story is one of thousands of tales of 
segregation from the mid-20th century. But it is only one of 
the millions since US slavery began nearly 400 years ago. 

A horror story 

You probably wouldn't find the name "Josiah Henson" in any 
encyclopedia. Henson was one of the 7 million slaves "exported" 
from Africa to the United States in the 18th century. But make no 
mistake. His story would have been front-page news in any news- 
paper around the country, had he been white. Unfortunately, back 
then, aggression toward blacks was accepted by whites, and usu- 
ally went unanswered. 

As Henson recalled in an autobiographical piece, 
"...Exasperated at my defense, he (a local white man named Bryce 
Litton) suddenly seized a heavy fence-rail, and rushed me to bring 
matters to a sudden close. The ponderous blow fell; I lifted my arm to 
ward it off; the bone cracked like a pipe- stem and I fell 
headlong to the ground. Repeated blows then rained on my 
back, till both shoulder-blades were broken, and the blood 
gushed copiously from my mouth... Free, vigorous play of 
the muscle and arm were gone forever. 




Not too long ago 

Racism was still running rampant in America in the 1960's. But 

he had a dream. 

". . .Deeply rooted in the American dream that one day this nation 

will rise up and live out true meaning of its creed - We hold these 

truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal," Dr. 

Martin Luther King Jr. said in a 1963 speech in Washington, 

D.C. 

King spent a large portion of his life educating others and 

fighting for civil rights, while, at the same time, spending many 

weeks in jail for his rallies and demonstrations. He strove to end 

discrimination on busses - and at water fountains, where blacks 

were forced to drink out of separate and unsanitary facilities. This 

was all part of King's dream. Unfortunately, he died trying to fulfill 

it. He fell to the sniper fire of James Earl Ray on April 4, 1968. But 

his memory lives on, according to North student Cornell Woods. 

"His contributions have helped put people together," said Woods. 

"Because he fought for our rights, we have more rights and freedoms 

today." 



We're getting there 

Gone are the days of African Americans being considered Africans, 

rather than Americans. Much has changed in the past 45 years. 

Apart from isolated incidents like the beating of motorist 

Rodney King or sporadic Ku Klux Klan rallies, the United 

States has made great strides toward equality for blacks. 

Three accounts of African Americans can hardly justify an 

understanding of what hardships blacks had to endure through american 




A force for change 



-File photo 



According to Henson's account, the incident stemmed from an attackhistory. But through a little bit of research, the average person would realize 
Litton by several other white men. Henson went to help Litton - only to hjthat aggression and hatred toward someone of a different race, color or 
the incident blamed on him. After the beating, Litton turned to the other sifreligion is a waste of energy - and a total display of ignorance, 
onlookers and said "Didn't you see that damned nigger strike me?" We all breath the' same air and bleed the same-color blood. Skin color? That's 

"Of course they must say 'yes', " Henson wrote. only skin deep. 



Malcolm X challenged America to face prejudice and truth in the 1950's and 
1960's. A victim of poverty, Malcolm X changed his life around and became one 
of the inspirational leaders of the Civil-rights Movement. He educated the public, 
changing the lives of blacks and whites until his assasination in 1965. His 
influence still inspires people all over the world. 






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We asked: 



Martin Luther Kin 




"Without Martin Luther 
King and his purpose and 
lessons, I think my life 
would be harder to live. " 
Micheal Sullivan, 

Glades Campus 







■ 


v 




Jp*\ 






t- 


. .JsL\ ,/«% l! ^m( 



"My parents aided my per- 
sonal lack of ignorance. 
There are too many igno- 
rantpeople who arepreju- 
diced as a result. " 

Michelle Williams, 
Glades Campus 




"Martin Luther King's 
belief in peace has con- 
tributed to the strengthen- 
ing in my beliefs in peace. 
He, as a man, had a very 
positive effect on the coun- 
try." Scott Smith, 

Glades Campus 




"Martin Luther King 
made me more aware of 
the black culture. He had 
a dream and went for it I 
have dreams and he in- 
spired me to go for it. " 
Ian Goldberg, 
South Campus 




"Martin Luther King's 
point made through his 
famous statement, 'I have 
a dream ' was a good mes- 
sage and inpiration for 
both blacks and whites." 
Paige Laux, 
South Campus 



«: "«•. 



* : ;*c 








"If King hadn 't fought for 
our rights, we might still be 
living in conditions of the 
past." 

Muzit Tekeste, 
North Campus 




"His contributions have 
helped put people together. 
Because he fought for our 
rights, we have more rights 
and freedoms today." 

Cornell Woods, 
North Campus 




"Things are definitley better 
than they used to be, but we 
have a long way to go. The 
world as a whole needs to be 
colorblind " 

Vince Hodge, 
North Campus 



ilfili ill llilimiiil niiliii i iiDiiiil'i'ini 



February 2, 1 994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 9 



Page 8 the BEACHCOMBER February 2, 1994 



J^J? BEACHCOMBER jLJr 



Panthers struggle early but finish with a flourish 

Men are on track for another run 
at the conference title — state? 

By DAVID P. McDESMOTT 
Staff Reporter 

The Panthers (20-3, 5-0) started slow, but finished strong against Indian River Community 
College ousting them 94-75 on Jan. 22. 

The Pioneers (11-11, 2-3) got off to a 22-14 lead with 9:42 left in the first half with the help of 
a 13-2 run. That would be the last offensive push from the Pioneers because the Panthers then took 
control of the game. 

After the Panthers clawed their way back into the game, and with a little over 2:00 minutes left 
in the first half, they took the lead 33-3 1 on a pair of free throws by Marquis Wright. Wright finished 
with 14 points, including 6 for 6 from the line. 

Leading the way for the Panthers was Bernard Green with 18 points, including four three- 
pointers. Other players adding to the Panther attack were Tyshon Fisher with 14 points and Devon 
Green with 12 points. 

However, Coach Pospichal was quick to point out that PBCC is a tough team because he has 
so many talented players. He said if one guy has a bad night, there is always someone else to pick 
him up. Pospichal also said the support from the crowd was a big factor and he urges more people 
to come out for the games. 

Pospichal also noted that even though his Panthers appear to be on their way to a possible 
conference title, that they are staying focused on the game in front of them. But for now the Panther 
basketball team is running on all cylinders and they don't appear to be slowing down. 




— Photos by 
Justin Knapfel 




Jaan 



The Luik Twins 



Scott 



Brothers share passion for hockey 



By JUSTIN KNAPFEL 
Sports Editor 

The West Palm Beach Blaze have a pair of 
brothers on the team that can be hard to tell 
apart. Jaan and Scott Luik are twin brothers 
who have playing hockey together for a while. 

Scott is usually a Right Wing, but some- 
times he plays defense with his brother Jaan. 
It's easy to tell them apart on the ice because 
Jaan is a left-handed defenseman, wearing #5; 
and Scott is a right-handed forward wearing # 7 . 
Off the ice it's a different story. 

"Sometimes I answer to the name Jaan," 
said Scott, "It kind of feels like you're one 
person sometimes." 

Playing together on the same team is noth- 
ing new. They have played together at Miami 
University in Ohio, where they both majored in 
business. They also played for the Dayton 
Bombers of the East Coast Hockey League and 
also in Cincinnati. In Dayton, they played with 
fellow-Blaze goalie Todd Bojcun. 



It's not just a coincidence that they ended 
up playing together. 

"We're both pretty much identical hockey 
players, so if the coaches like one of us, they 
usually like the other one too," explained Jaan. 

Both Jaan and Scott were drafted by major 
league hockey clubs in 1988. Jaan was picked 
by the St, Louis Blues in the fourth round, and 
Scott was picked by the New Jersey Devils three 
picks later. Scott went on to two NHL camps 
with New Jersey, including a scrimmage game, 
and Jaan went to one NHL camp with St. Louis. 

After taking a year off, the 24-year old twins 
are in West Palm Beach playing some hockey. 

"The hockey is good, and they're getting 
better players," said Jaan. Also, Jaan ex- 
plained, a lot of people just don't know about 
the Blaze and the Sunshine Hockey League. 
"There's no reason why we shouldn't have at 
least 4,000 (fans) a game here, especially with 
the population base," Jaan said. 



Women's Tennis Schedule 



2/8 

2/10 

2/15 

2/17 

2/23 

2/25 

2/26 

3/1 

3/3 



AWAY at Lynn University 
HOME vs Broward 
HOME vs Miami/Dade-North 
AWAY at Maimi/Dade-Wolfson 
AWAY at Barry College 
AWAY at Hillsborough 
AWAY at FCCJ 
HOME vs Lynn University 
AWAY at Broward 



2:00 


3/8 


AWAY at Miami/Dade-North 


2:00 


3/14 


HOME vs Columbia University 


2:00 


3/15 


AWAY at Miami/Dade-North 


2:00 


3/17 


HOME vs FCCJ 


2:30 


3/21 


HOME vs DePaul 


3:00 


3/22 


HOME vs Cornell 


10:00 am 


3/24 


HOME vs Dartmouth 


2:00 


3/29 


HOME vs Miami/Dade-Wolfson 


2:00 


4/15-17 HOME STATE TOURNAMENT 



2:00 
2:00 
2:00 
2:00 
2:00 
2:00 
1:00 
2:00 
TBA 




PAUL RYAN — Photo bv Justin Knapfol 

The upcoming football Super Bowl 
signals that spring-season is nearing, 
The start of baseball season can't be 
far behind, 

Spring season is nearing 

By JUSTM KNAPFEL 
Sports Editor 

Winter sports at PBCC are about to begin. The 
baseball team kicks off their season on Feb. 1 at 
home against Palm Beach Atlantic at 7:00 pm. 

Some key players are returning: Shortstop 
Juan, Veras, pitcher Steve Adams, and pitcher 
Ken Wagner. Veras was drafted by the Texas 
Rangers and Wagner was drafted by Milwaukee in 
last year's draft. Also, many key freshman are 
starting this season. 

Pitcher Mark Brownson had a record of 8-3 
with an ERA of 1 .38 in his senior year. Brownson 
also struck out 95 batters in only 76. 1 innings. 
Outfielder Steve Kokinda, out of Cardinal New- 
man, was drafted by the Montreal Expos, Kokinda 
hit .393 with three homers. First baseman Kerry 
Mikulski hit .533 with four home runs, 30 runs 
batted in, and 15 doubles in his senior year. 
Mikulski was also drafted by the Milwaukee 
Brewers. Others include Garry Borge, Catcher 
Tony Morales, and Brian Dodge. 

TEAM ROSTER: 
# Name Position 

I Carlos Rodriguez Outfield 

3 GarryBorge 

4 Kevin Moran 

5 Steve Adams 

6 Sean Snyder 

7 J.CCleare 

8 Tony Morales 

9 Jason Senecal 

10 Jason Crossey 

II Steve Kokinda 

12 Juan Veras 

13 Brian Dodge 

15 Anthony Precanico 

16 Mark Brownson 



Pltch/OF 
Second Base 
Richer 
Catcher 
Pitch/SS 
Catcher 
Pitcher 
Outfield 
Outfield 
Short Stop 
SS/OF 
Outfield 
Pitcher 



18 Matt Lira Pitcher 

19 H.H.Verner Catcher 

20 Ken Wagner Pitcher 

21 Kerry Mikulski First Base 

22 RyanPestenski Third Base 
24JadyHffl 3B/1B 

25 Marc Hayes Pitcher 

27 Scott Sorensen Pitcher 
30 Keith Ambrose Pitcher 
33 Paul Ryan First Base 

HOME SCHEDULE (February) 
2/1 vs Palm Beach Atlantic 7:00 pm 



2/8 vs Northwood 
2/10 vs Brevard 
2/12vs Hillsborough 
2/13 vs Polk 
2/15vs Northwood 
2/16 vs Broward 
2/17vs Manatee 
2/19vs Valencia 
2/22 vs Northwood 



7:00 pm 
4:00 pm 
2:00 pm (DH) 
1:00 pm 
7:00 pm 
3:00 pm 
4:30 pm 
6:00 pm 
7:00 pm 



2/26 vs Miami/Dade-North 2:00 pm 



PBCC Central Campus Humanities Gallery 
offers local and campus artists a showcase 



By STEPHANIE TOOKES 
Staff Reporter 

For many people, like myself, the words "Body Shop" automatically 
lead me to visualize a place where car bodies are repaired. However, 
artist Angi Curreri's creativity reveals a not so iusual interpretation of 
these otherwise familiar words. 

Curreri's oil pastel work titled "Body Shop," is a shop where human 
body parts, not car parts, fill the shelves lining her body shop. Teeth, 
eyes, ears, toes etc., all are arranged neatly and each a different size, 
shape and color. 

Sound fascinating? Yes. But Curreri's artwork is just one of many 
pieces currently on display at the Central Campus Humanities Gallery 
show titled, "Contemporary Ceramics: A Narrative Apporach." The 
Gallery's unusual exhibit of fired ceramics closed Jan. 29. 

Six artists displayed their spectacular works: Andrew Binder, John 



Foster, Angi Curreri, Susan Urbanek and Dora and Robert Strother. 
Although some pieces were not for sale, prices ranged from $35 to $2400. 

"Body parts was an idea that I had prior to spinal surgery," Curreri 
explained. -All of my work is autobiographical and highly symbolic in 
color and imagery. My art is an outgrowth of my childhood memories, 
present dreams and current experiences," 

Each of the participants wrote a brief summary of their life, beliefs and 
creative thoughts. These summaries helped the viewer to better under- 
stand the artwork. 

Robert and Dora Strothers' vessel collection was eye catching. Each 
of the vessels had a different pattern, size and shape. Also, they were a 
mix of light beige and grey. The Strothers' are members of the Florida 
' Atlantic University Potters Guild. 

Visit the Humanities Gallery often because it is a quiet and interesting 
space where surprised await, and constraints fall away. 



Race tightens in the Sunshine HLi Blaze challenged by Jacksonville 

Blaze hold slim lead, but they're not as dominating 



By JUSTIN KNAPFEL 
Sports Editor 

The West Palm Beach Blaze 
have found themselves in unfa- 
miliar territory — in a close race. 
After many roster changes and 
injuries, the Blaze have many- 
new faces, and the Jacksonville 
Bullets right on their tail. 

Over the Holidays, the Blaze 
lost key players: Forward Chick 
Pojar and Dan Fowler. Pojar 
moved up to the East Coast 
League, which is the highest 
league before the National Hockey 
League. Fowler decided to hang 
up his skates because of his back 
problems. Defenseman Chad 
Nelson also called it quits and 
Pasi Scalin was traded to Day- 
tona Beach where he joined 
former Blaze teammates Kevin 
MacKay and Vladimir Rubes. For- 
ward Daniel Vinetti from last 
year's Blaze roster returned to 
West Palm. 

The Blaze had been playing 



musical chairs with their goal- 
ies since Todd Bojcun and Mike 
Gregorio went down with inju- 
ries. Scott Hopkins has the most 
playing time over Kelly Dyer and 
Bayne Koen. Koen was cut after 
one game, and Hopkins had to 
leave the team for personal rea- 
sons. 

Bojcun has been working out 
and skating with the team, but it 
may be a while until he returns 
to tend goal. When Bojcun re- 
turns, Dyer will most likely have 
to beat out Gregorio for the sec- 
ond goaltending spot because 
Bojcun has a 10-0-1 record in- 
cluding a 92.4 save percentage, 
a 2. 10 goals against average. 

After Jacksonville raised 
their record to 17-8-3, they are 
only four points away from the 
Blaze. At one point, the Blaze 
were tied with Jacksonville at 
35 points. The holiday rampage 
that the Bullets went on (12 : 2- 
1), propelled them to second 



place. 

The other race that has tight- 
ened is the race for the scoring 
title. The Blaze have four on the 
top ten, Rob Celotto is a close 
third with 43 points. Last year's 
scoring leader, Scott Garrow is 
right behind Celotto with 42 points. 



Chris Caulfield has 37 points 
and only eight penalty minutes 
in 30 games. Brent Fleetwood 
also has 37 points in 28 games. 

Home games: February 3, 4, 
11&12. 

All game times are at 7:30 
p.m. 



1 1994 SOFTBALL SCHEDULE 


2/11-12 


AWAY at St. Petersburg 


TBA. 


2/22 


HOME vs Miami/ Dade-Kendall 


3:00 


2/24 


HOME vs Miami/Dade-North 


3:00 


3/3 


AWAY at Edison 


3:00 


3/8 


HOME vs Broward 


3:00 


3/10 


AWAY at Miami/Dade-Kendall 


3:00 


3/11-12 


AWAY at Broward Tournament 


TBA. 


3/15 


AWAY at Miami/Dade-North 


3:00 


3/18-20 


AWAY at Santa Fe Tournament 


TBA 


3/24 


HOME vs Edison 


3:00 


3/29 


AWAY at Broward 


3:00 


4/1-2 


AWAY at FCCJ 


TBA 


4/22-23 


at Orlando for STATE TOURNAMENT TBA 


5/5-7 


at Lake City for NJCAA TOURNAMENT TBA 



TYPIST WITH LASER PRINTER 
LOOKING FOR WORK 



FAST, RELIABLE AND REASONABLE! 
CALL SHERRY 
HOME OFFICE: (407) 852-0131 



WINDOWS SEMINAR 

FEBRUARY 10, 1994 at 7:00 p.m. in BA 203. 

Cost: $15 for currently enrolled students & employees 

$20 for General Public 

FREE for DPMA Student Chapter Members 

Contact Mary Kelly McWaters at 439-8306 






MUS€UM 



S3 

m 

o 

*££ 

"ess 




CALL S82-O0O6 



. E ifME tit B;RipQ K-S :g g 



January 15 to February 27 



WINTER TERM WORKSHOPS 

. ART OF INTERVIEWING ' 

February 1 5:00 - 6:30 

Continuing Ed, Room 123 
April 5 5:00 - 6:30 

RESUME WRITING 

ll» M» t i >» Hi* llll II M II>i«l>> Mm »l >iMW III»*»W4**M.*<***< 

February 8 5:30 ~ 6:30 
March 21 5:30 - 6:30 

CAREER FOCUS FOR THE 
ADULT COLLEGE STUDENT 

i nn M ili um H ' lH i u' l t' ip m l i i nu iiii . iii Hu iii'ii n iii iii ii n w*«*«**»wii 1 1 1 n 



March 1 



4:00 - 7:00 



JOE SEARCH STRATEGIES 

- i -I'm " ■ "irT--|inrn[r i i 

April 27 5:00 - 6:00 

All workshops (unless otherwise indicated) 
will be held is Allied Health - Room 104 



■ ^— ■ ■ ■ ■ ffffflHM l »W ilWM!"_iJIW J i'l/ "fi' ff 1 'I' '"I 1 'iil'IK Wi' lti fJU l il 1 1 | "" 



' ■ ■mi i 111 mi i ii u i i rt ii n 111 ii ii ii 111 \t mil l in < i i ii ii mi n i ■ 



Page 10 the BEACHCOMBER February 2, 1 994 



February 2, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 1 1 



ENTERTAINMENT 

JLrf/ BEACHCOMBER -M. 



'Section 8' rocks & rolls the Foundation 

South Florida is a hotbed for local bands 



By D.S.ULLERY 
Entertainment Editor 

On Friday, February 4, 1 994, a new name will be added to the 
increasingly long list of local bands making a name for them- 
selves in South Florida when "Section 8" plays at the Foundation. 

Lead Vocalist Matt Vizzo, 18, of West Palm Beach was kind 
enough to grant the Beachcomber an interview, discussing differ - 
ent aspects of the band. That interview follows. 

the Beachcomber. To begin with, where did you come up with 
the name "Section 8 ?" 

Matt Vizzo: Well, one night earlier last year 1 was on the phone 
with a close friend of mine, and we were discussing different titles 
for the group. One of our original ideas was "Jerry's bastard 
Kids," but we were a little nervous about offending everyone, so 
we were trying to come up with something a little more palatable. 
That was when my mother, who had apparently overheard part 
of the conversation, suggested "Section 8." We liked the sound of 
it, and that was the true we decided on. 

BC : And a "Section 8" is the title given for a military discharge 
for reason of insanity, isn't it? 

MV: Yes. 

BC: So how long has the band been together? 

MV: Actually, we've been playing haphazardly since 1 99 1 , not 
really taking it seriously. That was due to our not finding a bassist 
with the right sound for the band. That changed last year when 
Matt Snyder joined the group. 

BC: So Snyder had the sound you were looking for? 

MV: Oh, yeah, he's really talented - it didn't take long to realize 
that with Matt in the band, the sound worked. So after he joined 
permanently, we began to practice for real. 

BC: Who are the other members? 

MV: Well, you know that Matt's on bass, and I do vocals, but 
there are two other members as well — lead guitarist Clint 
Jaquinde and drummer Miguel Ortiz. Like Matt, they both have 
exceptional talent, and are good friends of mine. 

BC: Now, you're about to play at the Foundation, a rather 
popular club in this part of town, yet you seem somewhat relaxed. 
Have you played other gigs? If so, where? 

MV: Once we played at the Crocodile Rock cafe, and we also 




SECTION 8 ~" Pnot0 by Stephanie Vizzo 

L-R Back: Matt Snyder, Matt Vizzo and Miguel Ortiz. 
Front: Clint Jaquinde 



appeared at the Amnesty International Festival held at Bryant 
Park a while back. Before those, you're going back to high school 
shows, etc. 

BC: What type of music does the band play? 

MV: It hard to say actually. We create out own material, so the 
resulting songs are of a wide range - from harder metal to really 
funky riffs. On, we have some unique lyrics too. 

BC: So the audience at the Foundation can expect to hear 
songs that are entirely original? 

MV: Definitely. 

BC: So what's on the horizon for "Section 8 ?" 

MV: Well, we're going to continue to practice at our warehouse 
and devise more of our own original material. That's cool, 
because there are always ideas coming to us. There's a lot of 
talent in the band, and when you add to that our love of the 
music, I think you can see what it is that keeps us together, 

BC: Well, that's good to hear. Thank you for your time, Matt. 

MV: No problem, cat. 

For further information on the band, call 585-7210. For 
those who do not know, The Foundation is located on the corner 
of Southern Blvd. and Military Trail. Admission to the show is 
$5.00 per person. Take a chance on something new, and get 
ready to go mental with "Section 8." 



American Indian Dance Theatre 



By CHRIS HARRIS 
FAU Correspondent 

The Duncan Theatre has witnessed many 




MEN'S FANCY DANCER: Marty Pinnecoose, a 
member of the Southern Ute Tribe, is one of 
the champion Men's Fancy Dancers. 

fine performances over the years, but none 
more spectacular than the American Indian 
Dance Theatre's two sold-out shows. 

With an entourage of over twenty American 
Indians, from many different tribes, the audi- 
ence was hypnotized by one of the most daz- 



zling performances in America today. 

The AIDT are a mixture of singers, dancers, 
and musicians who have come together to pre- 
serve the musical culture and traditions of 
Native American people. 

"They have become the first company to 
successfully present traditional Native Ameri- 
can dances in a theatrical setting without sac- 
rificing the basic integrity and meaning of the 
dances," Managing Director of the Duncan 
Theatre, Lee Bell, explained. 

Not only are they preserving their culture, 
they are also entertaining thousands of people 
across the country. The Duncan Theatre was 
no exception as the crowd clapped along and 
cheered at the amazing spectacles in front of 
them. 

One of the most wonderful exhibitions of 
the night was the Hoop Dance performed by 
Eddie Swimmer, a member of the Cherokee 
Tribe. Swimmer manipulated a large number of 
hoops, and managed to writhe his limbs in and 
out of the hoops in order to form shapes of 
flowers, eagles, turtles, butterflies and other 
living things. It's no wonder Swimmer is one of 
the country's leading hoop dancers. 

Other spectacular performances included 
the hypnotic wild- dancing by several American 
Indians who were wearing beautiful costumes, 
and the somber opening of the show which was 
dedicated to a deceased musical director. 

Words cannot continue to describe the 
splendid performance that the American In- 
dian Dance Theatre gave to the south Florida 
community. If you ever get a chance to see them 
perform again, book your tickets for the show of 
a lifetime. 

If you can't wait until the next time they 
come to town, or if you would like to see the 
performance again, a video by the group is 
available for sale at a local Native American 
store. Call the Little Eagle store at (407)642- 
71 10 for more information. 



DON'T 
FORGET 

FEBRUARY 



BLACK 

HISTORY 

MONTH 



FEATURE V 

-™- BEACHCOMBER ikjF 



Tourette Syndrome: The real story 

One student's first person account 



By STUART SCHWARTZ 
Stqff Reporter 

My name is Stuart Schwartz. I haveTourette 
Syndrome. Tourette Syndrome was first de- 
scribed by a physician in 1885, his name was 
Gilles de la Tourette. TS is a neurological 
disorder in which individuals exibit vocal out- 
bursts and physical movements otherwise 
known as tics. Tics are exibited two ways: one 
being vocal tics such as vulgar, racial, sexual 
and otherwise offensive language; and two, 
physical tics such as crotch grabbing, leg jerk- 
ing, flipping the bird and other physical move- 
ments, even as far as touching or grabbing 
other people. 



Many people might say that living with TS is 
a battle, but to me a battle is when you are 
missing an arm or a leg. I may have TS, but 
that's is nothing to get down about because it's 
something that I was born with; it's a part of me 
and it'll be with me for as long as I live. I just 
have to go on and deal with it the best way I 
know how. 

Dealing with TS is a constant control game; 
It's more like mind over matter. I know what's 
right to say and do, but my body likes to do what 
it likes to do. In turn, I must do things to 
compensate for my body by using the little bit 
of control that I do have. 

As far as dealing with TS on a daily basis, 
well, that's a whole new game in its self. I have 



to worry about who 1 might offend, or who I 
might flip the bird. And in dealing with ordi- 
nary people in every day situations, it can be 
kind of frustrating when your trying to talk to 
someone and they hear these little slurs com- 
ing from you . Pretending they aren't happening 
doesn't really help because they just keep com- 
ing, and, finally, the person asks what are you 
saying. All I can say is that I have TS, and 
explain that it's a neurological disorder. 

Most people understand about TS if I ex- 
plain it to them, and not try to talk around it. It 
gets very tiring constantly explaining myself 
and the power TS exerts over my life, but if I 
don't who will? 

In sharing my story, I hope that I have 
taught you a little about TS, and about those of 
us who must live with it. We all have our own 
separate problems, some worse than others, 
but if we work together, we can solve anything 
that this world throws at us. 



Drama Festival '94 offers five one act plays 

PBCC Players present student production 



By ROBERT G. GERARD 
Photo Editor 

After a successful production last term of 
Look Homeward Angel, a play that left the 
audience with tears rolling down their cheeks, 
the PBCC Players are changing modes and 
presenting five, original one act plays during 
Drama Festival 1994 at the Watson B. Duncan 
Theater on Central Campus. 

Appearing in LHA as stonecutter Gant's 
second son, Patrick 

Wilkinson (his real name) and assistant Kellie 
Hillyer are directing Mama's Flowers, the only 
dramatic presentation of the five plays. Written 
by Tanya Greene, a drama student, the play 
reflect a small town mother's reaction when her 
daughter is dying from AIDS. Heartfelt reac- 
tions grip the emotions when one realizes it's 
her daughter, played by Charlene Cowen, that's 
revealing such horrific news. During rehearsal 
cast members occasionally requested to be 
read from the script by asking Director Pat 
Wilkinson for their "line", needing only the first 
few words to refresh the memory. Later on, in a 
virtually deserted Duncan theater, the eminent 



Frank Leahy sat in the audience or walked to 
and fro while coaching the student directors. 
Unaffected by this, Charlene Cowen, then in 
character, knelt at her mother's side pleading to 
be allowed the dignity of a cremation, instead of 
a burial after her death from AIDS in a touching 
scene. 

Three original comedies and a mystery en- 
titled Where or When will be featured during 
Drama Fest from an acting company that does 
the lighter side with the ability to perceive the 
ludicrous and deliver it with wit and 
satire. 



The PBCC Players and their tech- 
nical staff are leaders in innovative 
stage applications and during the 
show, they will employ sets arranged 
on the main stage in quadrants, each 
curtained and lit individually to en- 
sure an uncalamitous environment 
with as little set movement as pos- 
sible: Also, one play, the title of which 
cannot be revealed, will be preformed 
in an interspersed, sequential format 
during the entire show. 



Under the sponcership of Sunny Meyer and 
the direction of the veteran Frank Leahy, some 
thirty persons in the group continue to show 
devotion and love for their art. Rehearsals run 
for hours, writing and rewriting plays take 
energy and talent, directing them takes intu- 
ition, and of course acting requires concentra- 
tion, projection, feeling and something called 
stage presence, which isn't always an easily 
attainable element of showmanship. 

Drama Festival is free to all students and 
the public, and will presented Friday, February 
1 1 at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, February 12 at 7:30 
and Sunday, February 13 for a matinee show- 
ing at 2:00 p.m. 




SUBS J9\ 

MARINATED STEAKS m 



Language immersion programs offered: 
Travel to exotic lands and get class credit!! 

Programs also include travel to Canada 



Board/ 

from page-5,.„ .„ 

programs offered foreign students at PBCC, but also programs offered abroad for students 
of PBCC. 

. This summer students can travel to Jonquiere, Quebec, where over eighty five percent 
of the population speak only French — to study that language. Contact Professor Alyse 
Schoenfeldt for more information at (407) 625-2553. 

A three or six credit hour Language Immersion Course in Spanish will be taught in 
Salamanaca, Spain, also by Alyse Schoenfeldt. A similar program in Bangkok, Thailand has 
just been approved and will be led by Kathleen Asher who can be reached at 439-8137. 

In the summer of 1994 Mr. Gene Arrant and Mr. Thomas Steffen will lead a "Summer 
Semester Abroad." A group of PBCC students will travel to Costa Rica, where they will have 
the opportunity to take up to six credit hours in such areas as Art, Music, Photography, 
Earth Science, Marketing or Spanish. 

PBCC is also offering an English Immersion Program to foreign students and business 
professionals from abroad by taking advantage of the available student housing at Panther 
Park. These Classes will be conducted at the Central Campus with a variety of trips to 
several Florida attractions. 

The Eissey Campus, reported to the board that Imad El-Jeaid had been chosen from 
fifty-six applicants to teach physics and other related courses at the Eissey Campus. 

The Board also passed an amendment to DBOT Rule 6Hx-18-5.16 concerning early 
retirement and heard other issues from construction and development to general business 
affairs. 

The District Board of Trustees will meet at Glades Campus on Feb. 9. 




We Do Hot Serve a Philly Cheese Steak 



JON SMITH'S 
Sirloin Steak Sub 



Authentic 
Philly Checscstcak 



100% Sirloin 5teak 

Sliced and Marinated 

on the Premises 

100% Rich 
Provolone Cheese 

Fresh and 
Cooked to Order 



vs. 



vs. 



vs. 



Pre-SHced riap Meat 

or Beef Knuckles 

Usually Frozen 

Processed Cheese 
Pre-Cooked and Dry 



We Don't Just Say Quality, 
We Do It! 

... or my name's not 




IIIIIHIIH' ll|l||f l|l|| I I I I'l 'I Ml' "II" I II ft 111 BBK^I 



TOnrowPHi i'i i i i .L.i r .wni 



-TmnRnvm. 1,11 .yiu.iiJuiuiA 



Page 12 



the BEACHCOMBER February 2, 1 994 



comics: 

^^^/ BEACHCOMBER Jk«J^ 



STRANGE 




*'^g?g.gSB,^'^Tr-^»'''i fCTrmpmn* ™giro^^.»irraf «g3mi^^ 



THE Crossword 



useofFsher 




ACROSS 
1 Misses a step 
6 Lab animals 
Long fishes 

114 Michigan's 
neighbor 

115 Potpourri 
|16 " — for All 

Seasons" 
|l7Gotup 
]1 8 Dr. Sagan 
19 Descartes 

Disavowal 
Dasher or 
Blitzen 

4 Boxing losses 

6 Guided 

7 Surrounds with 
troops 

1 Ship letters 

2 Helicopter part 
" Peruses 

5 Woman's 
secret? 

8 Soon 

39 Montana city 

40 Satiate 
'41 Recipe meas. 

42 Entire range 
J43 Sweet stuff 
'344 Lad 
J45 Line of bold 

cliffs 
47 Eight-sided 

figure 

$1 Monthly 

expense 

< 52 Thought 

logically 

54 Made points 

8 Unlit 

9 Member of 
royalty 

1 Act 

2 It. family 
Snare 
Lariat 

65 Relax 
'36 Fast planes 
167 Made a 
mistake 



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DOWN 

1 Food fish 

2 Entice 

3 Heavy element 

4 Put into place 



* 1993 Tribune Media Services. 
All Rights Reserved 



5 Gym shoe 

6 Fabled bird 

7 Winglike 

8 Wearies 

9 Isolation 

10 Bed of roses? 

11 Turk, title 

12 Saree wearer 

13 Mortimer — 
21 Ship's diary 
23 Loch — 

monster 
25 Watery portion 
of blood 

27 Nasty child 

28 Long periods of 
time 

29 Road sign 

30 Inaugurate 

34 Fragrant oil of 
roses 

35 Simple green 
plant 

36 Stir into action 

37 "Jane — " 

39 Knives on rifles 

40 Buyer 



ANSWERS 

If 
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RIG 



EIA 



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JANUARY 19. PUZZLE 



42 Kind of dancer 

43 Heartfelt 

44 Berry container 

46 "— Miserables" 

47 Decree 

48 Halt 

49 Small oies 



50 Approaches 
53 Minced oath 

55 Lion's sound 

56 Kitchen end 

57 Lock or line 
60 Some records: 

abbr. 



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;xi.: 




THE QUESTION: 

"Did you vote for Bill Clinton? 
If not, why not?" 

FOR THE ANSWER -Sae P ages6&7 



^MTl^iJ 



ffatida Community College 
Tress Association 



Is the government telling us She tiuih about 
condoms in its televised 'safe sex' campaign? 
Bee gwmt editorial % 
Sally Mtetaeh ... -Sss Papa 



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Volume 54 Number 12 PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE ♦ LAKE WORTH, FLORIDA 



^Classroom Building IP nears completion 




Eissey Campus also adds new entrance/fexit to its mad system 



By DOUG SHUPE 

Stcrff Reporter/North Campus 

Since last June, students of Edward M. Eissey 
Campus have noticed a new three-story structure 
rising from its foundation. Soon to be the largest 
building on campus, "Classroom Building II" will 
open on a once-vacant piece of land just west of the 
Library Learning Resource Center (LLRC).. 

According to Piper Walton, Physical Plant Super- 
visor for the north campus, funds for construction 
are the resulted from a survey taken at the Eissey 
Campus. 

"A plant-facility report is done every five years by 
college administrators and different colleges. They 
basically submit to the state a survey that, says this 
facility (PBCC Eissey Campus) can have 2,500 feet of 
chemistry lab. In order to get funded, you must stay 
within the design parameters that the state sets." 

Once all the plans for the new building were 



made, and all the measurements were confirmed, the 
floor space for every classroom, office, and lab had to 
be fit into the detailed building plan. 

"It's kind of like a puzzle. The location of each 
classroom is decided with the help of architects,'' said 
Walton. 

The first floor will contain a 250-seat teaching 
auditorium, ceramics lab, photography lab, print- 
making lab, and an art-design lab. Also, a secured art 
gallery will occupy the bottom level. Two classrooms, 
math and reading-development, and computer labs 
will occupy the second floor. Also, tutoring rooms and 
quiet study-areas will be available. Located on level 
three will be four large classrooms, a business man- 
agement lab, and a job training center. The third floor 
will also be home to director's offices, a faculty lounge 



Please see/BUILDING 

page 2 



February 16, 1994 

FAIPs Catanese 
nixes PBGC's 
South Campus 
expansion 



By MHOS MTTSBFF 
Editor 

Anyone who grew up during 
the "cold war," between the 
United States and the now-de- 
funct USSR, was witness to the 
constant rhetoric and tit-for-tat 
shenanigans of the two most 
powerful governments in the 
world. At the time, not coinci- 
dentally, the Russians domi- 
nated chess-play worldwide — 
until the early 1970s when an 
American, Bobby Fischer, took 
the Russian Chess Champion, 
Boris Spaasky, down. 

Strategies employed in chess 
are taken from military engage- 
ments, but they work equally 
well in politics. 

Successful politicians, as do 
chess masters, use similar strat- 
egies to gain control over situa- 
tions and opponents, thereby 
achieving their goal — to win. 
Every move is carefully planned 
and executed, for, after all, poli- 
ticians live for the excitement of 
the "game," and the eventual, 
checkmate! 

A territorial dispute between 
Florida Atlantic University Presi- 
dent Anthony Catanese and 
Palm Beach Community College 
President Edward M. Eissey is 
emerging. On the surface, the 
struggle seems straightforward 
enough. PBCC has a medium- 
sized South Campus {PBCC cur- 
rently occupies 25 acres) located 

Please see/LAND 
page 5 



Former member of the British Parliament, 
John Brown, visits PBCC Central Campus 



By DANIEL M. MOON 
Stqff Reporter 

A former-member of the 
BritishParliamentvisitedPalm 
Beach Community College 
Central Campus, where he 
again visited Professor Daniel 
O'Connell's Comparative Gov- 
ernments class February 3. 

John Brown, a member of 
the House of Commons from 
1979 to 1992, today, is an 
investment banker in London 
and New York. He explained to 
O'Connell's class why Great 
Britain is not a Democracy. 

"Itis aDemocraticMonar- 
chy,"saysBrown. QueenEliza- 



V.,.Al, TT 1,, 



Ir*.*^^ 



power, but she disguises it ^ 
with modesty, Brown points 
out. She is so successful at it 
that even many British sub- 
jects aren'taware ofherpower. 
One areaof powerthatthe 
Queen has, according to 
Brown, is a weekly private 
meeting with the Prime Minis- 
terfcurrenuyJohnMajor). "No 
one else is there except the 
Queen and the Prime Minis- 
ter, "says Brown. "Even secre- 
taries aren't allowed in the 
room." They discuss the af- 
fairs of Britain, and, according 
to Brown, no current orformer 
Prime Minister will talk about 

■.,4-,o+ rf/vaar\n TvVltnH thftdosed 



doors. 

Brown cites many other 
areas where the Queen holds 
nondemocratic powers. 
Among them: The Monarch is 
the head of the armed forces 
and police. Soldiers and offic- 
ers are required to sign an 
allegiance, "not to the statebut 
to the Queen," says Brown. "If 
you don't think that's power, 
then you shouldn't be in this 
class." 

The Queen also signs-off 
on every bill passed by parlia- 

See BROWN/ 

page 2 




Photo by Chris Harris 
L-R, Professor Daniel O'Connell and John Brown, former 

member of the British House of Commons 



AWf l W I ffl tTHl i i f W 



Page 2 



the BEACHCOMBER 



February 16, 1994 



February'' 16, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 3 




PBGC North Campus road work eases congestion 



BUILDING/ 

from front page 

and conference rooms. 

The different size rooms will 
give us a lot of versatility as far as 
what can be taught in each," said 
Walton. 

Students will be able to enjoy 
the second-floor patio that will 
contain four large planters sur- 
rounded by benches. Multiple 
staircases will allow students ac- 
cess to the patio from inside or 
outside of the building. The struc- 
ture is now called "Classroom 
Building II." The construction 
which began on June 6, 1993, 
should come to an end by June of 
this summer. • 



Another proposed plan for the 
campus is a four -story parking 
structure. The parking structure 
will contain 577 spaces, and, if 
approved, will be built east of the 
LLRC. Other parking lots were 
planned, but they would have re- 
sulted in destroying plant and ani- 
mal life around the campus. 

"We had other lots, b-.it as we 
got into the master plan, we real- 
ized that it just wasn't going to 
work. There is too much preserve 
area in the back, and it's home for 
some gopher turtles," said Walton. 

The parking garage would defi- 
nitely benefit PBCC; however, it 
has yet to be confirmed. It must be 
approved by the state in the next 
plant-facility report in 1995. 



Traffic, too, has been a major 
problem at the Eissey Campus. 
The driveway does not encircle the 
campus, and as a result, students 
exclusively use the exit on PGA 
Boulevard, and it causes long lines 
of traffic after school. To alleviate 
the problem, the school just com- 
pleted a stacking-lane on PGA 
Boulevard. Students exiting to the 
right can turn directly into the 
right lane. 

To further decrease congestion, 
and the resulting aggravation, the 
PGA entrance at Fairchild Gar- 
dens Avenue will open through to 
Campus Drive. Students will then 
be able to use the west entrance 
and pass the new theater and the 
post office, allowing them access 



to PGA Blvd. on either Campus 
Drive or Fairchild Gardens Avenue . 

Students and faculty are look- 
ing forward to the completion of 
the various projects on campus. 
As for traffic at the PGA entrance, 
Walton believes that it will decrease 
when students realize that the west 
entrance is open. 

"The west entrance, when ev- 
erybody figures it out, is probably 
going to get more popular because 
you can miss the two lights at the 
Gardens Mall," Walton explained. 




JOIN THE CROWD AT 
the BEACHCOMBER! 

'editorial • word processing • layout 
cartoonists • comic strip artists 
•reporters CALL439-8064 



Queen holds the power in 

Britain over Parl iament 

BROWN/ 

from front page 

ment if she doesn't, it doesn't become law. Brown cites the law 
prohibiting homosexual conduct as an example. Because the 
Queen couldn't comprehend female homosexuals, she crossed out 
all references in the bill to women. As a result, Brown says, 
homosexuality is illegal between men but legal between women. 

Another example of the Queen's power is Treaties between 
Britain and foreign governments. The Queen has to sign them too; 
however, Brown says that she usually gives power-of-attomey to a 
representative ofHer Majesty's government. This is in case the treaty 
turns out to be bad for Britain, then the Queen's signature doesn't 
appear on the document. „ ^ 

The Queen's power is inherited, says Brown, and the only way 
to become a King of Queen is by birth. 

Despite this, Brown says that he supports the Democratic 
Monarchy, buthehasafewideas concerningreform— more power- 
sharing between the House of Lords and the House of Commons. 
Brown is writing a book on the subject (Democracy: the Great British. 
Myth] is due out soon. 



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Editorial 



BEACHCOMBER 



Truth withheld from the public 
concerning federally-fiinded and 

sponsored TV condom campaign 



By SALLY BEACH 
Guest Editorial 

The federal government is cur- 
rently embarking on a fatally- 
Hawed television campaign to pro- 
mote condom use to prevent the 
spread of AIDS. The bureaucrats 
involved in this deceptive crusade 
are well aware of the ineffective- 
ness of latex condoms. In pro- 
moting latex condoms, they, with- 
out informing the public of the 
well-established deficiencies and 
deadly risks involved, are guilty of 
committing genocide on the Ameri- 
can people. 

We have recently learned that, 
among other atrocities, this same 
government secretly fed radioac- 
tive cereal to retarded children. 
Any serious review of America's 
history reveals ample evidence of 
the government lying to its people. 
Any scholarly search of the scien- 
tific literature produces abundant 
data substantiating the ineffective- 
ness of condoms in preventing the 
transmission of AIDS. A few in- 
clude: 

The recent study done by the 
FDA (Food and Drug Administra- 
tion) titled, "Barrier Effectiveness 
of Latex Condoms to HIV-sized Par- 
ticles Under Conditions of Simu- 
lated Use." Researchers placed a 
latex condom over an artificial pe- 
nis and measured the leakage rate 
of HIV-sized particles. Even though 
the test did not incorporate move- 
ment, 30 per cent of the condoms 
leaked HIV-sized particles. These 
results validate numerous other 
studies establishing that the pores 
in latex are much larger than the 
AIDS virus, allowing the virus to 
penetrate latex. 

Another study released at the 
1993 International Conference on 
AIDS concluded that, even with 
consistent use, latex condoms 
FAILED to prevent the transmis- 
sion of AIDS 31 per cent of the 



time. This was an analysis of data 
from 11 separate studies that in- 
cluded 593 heterosexual couples 
In which the male was HIV posi- 
tive. (Weller, S. Ph.D."8ocial Sci- 
ence and Medicine," June 1993.) 

"Male to Female Transmission 
of Human Immunodeficiency Vi- 
rus," was published in the Jour- 
nal of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation, August 14, 1987. In this 
study of 97 women who had sex 
with AIDS-infected men, 23 per 
cent were infected with AIDS within 
one year. According to the study: 
"Condom use was not significantly 
associated with protection from in- 
fection." 

Condoms provide no protec- 
tion to the base of the penis, the 
scrotum, the symphysis, or the 
thighs. These areas are bathed 
• with vaginal secretions during sex. 
If the female has a sexually- trans- 
mitted disease, the risk of con- 
tracting AIDS is even higher for 
her male partner. 

The Government's position on 
promoting condom use for the pre- 
vention of AIDS has nothing to do 
with health or science. It has ev- 
erything to do with ideology and 
politics. The sexual revolution is 
being kept alive at any cost — 
including human lives. Common 
sense alone dictates that the 
condom's 10-30 per cent failure 
rate in preventing pregnancy is a 
sufficient argument against its use 
for preventing the contraction of a 
deadly disease. 

If the spread of AIDS is going to 
be curtailed, it must be treated like 
every other contagious disease. A 
tracking system must be put into 
place, and infected individuals who 
continue to engage in behavior that 
puts other people at risk must be 
quarantined. If we don't get a 
handle on this constantly-chang- 
ing virus, it has the potential of 
becoming even more widespread 




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Editor /Layout 
Viewpoints Editor 
Sports Editor 
Entertainment Editor 
Photography Editor 
Advertising Manager 



the B EACHCOMB ER 

— 1993 — 

Florida Community Coilege Press Association 

Award Winners 

— George P. Heis — 
Hret place Best Arts Review & 

Second piaee in-depth Reporting. 

— Robert 6. Gerard .— 

Third piace Sports Photo. 

— ieachcomber — 
Third piaee Design/Layout. 



MlkeMltseff 

Glen Friedman 

JustlnKnapfel 

D.S, UUery 

Robert Gerard 

K. Daniel Prussman 



Contributing Reporters 

Troy Crago, K. Daniel Prussman, Christopher Thurston, 
Stacey Skinner, Mike Glamatt, Daniel Moon, David P. McDermott 
Loura Lafayette, Doug Shupe, Stephanie Tookea and Chris Harris 

Opinions expressed In the Beachcomber do not neceeearity reflect 
the 'views of the Beachcomber or Palm Beach Commmnrtty College. 
tetters to the Editor most be signed. 



Palm Beach Community College 

BEACHCOMBER 

4200 Congress Avenue 

Lake Worth. FL 33461-4796 

(407) 439-8064 Fax (407) 439-8210 





Dr. Edward Eissey 
President/Publisher 



Ms. Vlckl Scheurer 
Faculty Adviser 



and difficult to control. A mutat- 
ing virus always becomes stronger 
and more resilient. 

Our nation can no longer con- 
tinue to ignore the tragic conse- 
quences and human suffering ad- 
herents to the sexual revolution 
have created. At this point in time, 
the physical and moral health of 
our country is dependent on its 
sexual mores. Condoms are inca- 
pable of making sex safe. There 
are no easy answers, no quick-fix 



solutions. The only safe sex is a 
mutually-monogamous, mature 
relationship with an uninfected 
partner. The promotion of any- 
thing else is suicidal. 

Sally Beach is currently an 
R.N. at JFK in the Cardio-Vascu- 
lar Intensive Care Unit. She has 
run, unsuccessfully, for the 
Palm Beach County School 
Board. She also headed up Gail 
Bjork's successful campaign/or 
the PBC School Board. 



SUBS 

MARINATED STEAKS 

A WORD 

ABOUT 

QUALITY 

qual • i * ty (kwol'i te) n. A level of excellence. 

Sometimes it seems that everyone sells the 
"highest quality food at the lowest price." But 
saying it doesn't mahe it so. 

TolKs, today some real chemical wonders are 
marheted as quality food. Just as inattentive and 
unmotivated employees are marketed as bright 
and fresh personnel. 

But quality food and service do not come from 
advertising agencies. Remember you don't actually 
eat super slick advertising, picture perfect menus 
or elaborate buildings, And when the smoke clears, 
you get what you pay for. You hope! 

I, Jon Smith, am totally committed to providing the 
best quality food and service for my customers. 
And my subs have the biggest portions in the 
business. 

Look at our food, look at our stores, look at our 
employees and see our commitment. 

At Jon Smith Subs quality is our only deal. 

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Page 4 



the BEACHCOMBER 



February 16, 1994 



February 16, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 5 



New, 



BEACHCOMBER 




United States Mep* Clay Shaw 
(R) speaks on welfare reform. 



^gTROYCRAOO 
Steffi Reporter 

On Jan. 28, United States Rep. 
Clay Shaw (R) from Fort Lauder- 
dale, lectured Professor Dan 
O'Connell's Introduction to Politi- 
cal Science class. Shaw discussed 
the partisan system Congress fol- 
lows and reforms proposed by the 
Clinton Ad- 



only for a two year period. During 
that time they will be given educa- 
tion, job training and placement 
assistance. If a job is not located 
after the time has expired, then the 
government will place that person 
into a job. Acceptance of the job 
. will not be a choice at that point. 
Shaw supports this new re- 



ministration. 

O'Connell 
wanted his 
students to 
gain three 
things from 

the lecture. . " 

First,- they 

would meet an actual Congress- 
man. Second, the students would 
gain some insight and understand- 
ing of the two-party system as it 
operates in Congress. Finally, and 
most Importantly, O'Connell 
wanted his students to get a sense 
of the political issues facing the 
nation In 1994. 

welfare reform was a major 
topic for discussion. Four years 
ago Shaw served on the Human 
Resources Subcommittee of the 
Ways & Means Committee, where 
he became involved in the welfare 
reform debate. Shaw proposed a 
plan three years ago that, accord- 
ing to Ills Washington Press Secre- 
tary Scott Brenner, has teen prac- 
tically adopted verbatim by Presi- 
dent Clinton. ■ 

Currently, a person can re- 
ceive welfare indefinitely, and in- 
cluding benefits, they can make 
more than a person who works 
forty hours a week at $6.00 an 
hour. Under the new plan recipi- 
ents can remain in the program 



Aithough considered a 'tough love" approach to 
welfare, Shaw says, the "biggest injustice is paying 
people not to get out of welfare..." 



form as he feels it is better to solve 
the problems ~ not just bandage 
them. Although considered a 
"tough love." approach to welfare, 
Shaw says the, "biggest injustice 
Is paying people not to get out of 
welfare..." For Shaw, self-esteem 
plays an important role in this 
reform. Many people in a situation 
requiring welfare feel that they can't 
do any better. Generations of fami- 
lies get caught in the welfare sys- 
tem and never get out, but Shaw 
hopes that education and job as- 
sistance in the new reform will, 
"give people a hand up rather than 
a hand out." Children of welfare 
recipients will gain some self-es- 
teem as well through day-care and 
after-school programs. 

Naturally there will be some 
problems along the way. Cur- 
rently President Bill Clinton has 
not incorporated either health care 
or welfare reform in his new bud- 
get. Because of this, Shaw says It 
is difficult to see where the fund- 
ing for these programs will come 



from. Another problem to over- 
come is the tremendous amount of 
fraud taking place through HRS. 
As part of the new bill, recipients 
will have their fingerprints checked 
to prevent them from claiming 
welfare benefits in two locations or 
from using forged birth certificates . 
Also, Shaw feels that better 
training for HRS employees is 
needed, they must know what ben- 
efits clients are entitled to, and 
what programs will help those on 
welfare to eventually get off wel- 
fare. Job performance ratings 
should be based on the number of 
people a worker gets out of the 
system, In- 
stead of how 
many they 
can deal with 
daily. 

The Clinton 
Administra- 
tion believes 
— ■■» ■ —— »w that the wel- 
fare and 
health care reforms are interre- 
lated. Shaw feels that instead, it 
would be better to relate welfare 
with the crime bill. The proposed 
crime bill states that if a person is 
convicted of a violent crime for a 
third time, he or she will spend the 
rest of their life in prison. How, 
does this relate to welfare? Shaw 
sees it in the sense that many 
criminals and juvenile offenders 
come from backgrounds involving 
welfare. If one system can be elimi- 
nated then perhaps the percent- 
ages of crime will drop as well. 

How do his constituents feel 
about the welfare reform? Shaw 
represents District 22, which runs 
along the coast east of US 1 from 
Juno to Miami. In these areas, 
including Palm Beach and Manala- 
pan, welfare does not seem to be a 
problem. According to Brenner, 
Shaw receives tremendous sup- 
port from his district. Welfare re- 
form is certainly one of the major 
political issues for 1994, and Shaw 
will be at the forefront of the change. 



PBGC's Foundation raises money for scholarships 



ByTROYCRAGO 
Staff Reporter 

Whenyou think of the PBCC Foundationyou probably 
think of Panther Park, the nearby, dormitory-style hous- 
ing offered to students. Most students pass by the 
Foundation's offices, located in the administration build- 
ing, without giving it much thought. But what exactly is 
the Foundation and what does it do? 

Since PBCC cannot directly raise funds for them- 
selves, this not-for-profit organization was created in 
1973. And although it receives salaries, space and oper- 
ating costs directly from the PBCC, the Foundation is 
considered a separate entity altogether. This unique 
arrangement allows for 100% of funds to be used in very 
specific areas. 

Who decides how the funds are disbursed? That's 
easy, says Abby Begel, director of development for the 
Foundation. The donor determines how their donation 
will be used. "When a donor says to use their money for 
pencils,'' says Begel, "then we do." If funds are needed 
elsewhere, say for computers, then Begel recommends 
where the money might be of better use. 

Foundation fund-raising creates numerous 
scholarships for the college. Through its efforts, 
a $ 1,000 scholarship from the Chamber of Com- 
merce recently went to Wilfred Ewan a business 
administration major with a4.0 GPAatthe Belle 
Glade Campus. Accordingto Begel, there are 30 
areas of student scholarships available, and 
most (Art, (Criminal Justice, and Business to 
name a few) have multiple scholarships. 

Begel's fund-raising efforts for the Founda- 
tion have allowed the library to remain open on 
Saturdays for the past three years. In addition, 
25-year old microscopes were replaced, and, 
also, the exhaust systems in the chemistry labs 



Millions 



'NO MATTER HOW HARD I TRY, 

MY GRADES REMAIN LOW!' 

of people have ATTENTION DERCfT DISORDERS or LEARNING 
DiSABlLmES that interfere with 
learning & achievement 
— For an evaluation, please call — 

RflYLES L COOLEY, PH.D., ABPP 
Licensed Psychologist #PY0002839 

4360 Northlake Blvd., Suite 210- 
.Palrn Beach Gardens, FL 3341 

(407)694-0001 



were repaired through donations. 

Currently, Begel is working on two major projects. 
Duncan Theatre's 720 seats are "up for sale." For a gift of 
$l,000adonor qualifies as a patron of the arts. Their name 
(or name of their choice) is placed on the back of the chair 
and displayed on the "Honor Roll," found in the lobby of the 
theatre. 

Also in the works is the Endowed Teaching Chair 
Program. Through the Foundation, a donor will make a 
contributionof $45,000 to which the state willadd $30,000. 
Interestgenerated from the $75,000 chairs will be awarded 
to teachers selected by PBCC and the Foundation for 
excellence in teaching. The faculty member holds the chair 
for a two year period with the stipulation that at least 40% 
of the award is used in their course of study. The other 60% 
is used at the discretion of the professor. Presently, five 
chairs are in existence, five in the works, with a total goal 
of fifty within two years. 

Also, future profits from Panther Park are placed into 
a general fund and disbursed as needed by the Founda- 
tion. And, as always, Dr. Eissey has the final word. 



plipM 



PBCC MByeag/Theatafe Club 
meets every other Thursday at 
10: 10 a.m. in the Duncan Theatre/ 
west entrance. Contact Mrs. Sunny 
Meyer at 437-8139 for more infor- 
mation. 

Inter Chib Co" "** pra) 

Meetings are held every Thursday at 
1:30 p.m. in the SAC LOUNGE, all 
students are invited to participate. 

Early Childhood Club meets the 
third Thursday of each month; 
January 13, February 10, March 
17, and April 14, from 12: 15 to 
1:15 in SC 113. Contact Sue 
Haines at 439-8046 or in SC 1 18. 

Students for International 
Understanding f SIUl club meets 
every Wednesday at 3:00 p.m. in 
the cafeteria. Contact Danlta Kurtas 
at 439-8233 for more information. 

The Computer Chab/DPMA is 

interested in new members, they 
meet the third Saturday of each 
month at 10 a.m. ContactMary Kelly 
McWaters for location at 439-8306. 

Mack Student Union fBSUl . 
meets every Wednesday at 1:30 
SS 103. Contact Mrs. Gwen 
Ferguson at 439-8327. 

^College Republican Club holds ; 
meetings in SS203 at 7 p.m. Call 
686-0970 for more information. 

Student Government Associa- 
tion fSfgAl meets every Thurs- 
day at 2:30 p.m. in the Student 
Activities Center (SAC), all 
students are encouraged to 
attend! 

Stadent BateCMtive Occupa- 
tional Therapy fSBOTI Chris 
next meeting is Jan. 24 at 10:3O 
am, inDH 101. 

CoBegfate Marie Bdncatogg Mo- 
tional Comfcgenee f CBfflSNffl m eets 
eveiy other Tuesday at 1:30 p.m. in. 
Rm. 110 in Humanities Bldg.? For 
more info, call Bob Jones at 439-8142. 

Student Nurses Association 
(SNA) is meeting March 15 at 
11:30 a.m. and March 17 at 
noon. Contact Easter Arora at 
439-8362. 

Delta Omlcgott chapter ofPh| 
TVfo y*FP* meets every other 
Sunday in Continuing Education 
(CE 121) at 7pm. The next meet- 
ing will be held on January 23. 
For more information contact Mr. 
Hamlin in BA 1 10. 

Piatrfbuthre Bdnc attom Chdb 
of America (DECA1 meets Tues.. 
Wed. and Sundays. Dates were 
unavailable at press time. 

For more information please 
call SuaanThompson at 641-0345. 

Stndent Executive Of ^ llffl - 

every Monday at 10:30 in 
AH10L Contact Silvia Meeker 
at 439-8094; .v 

. Stadaijt Resource ^fffl 
(SStCl meets every Thursday at 5 , 
p]tiMn me cafeteria CURRENTLY 
NOT MEETING. 



iliMiif^liilliiii: 

Siiiiiilliiiiii^ 

iiillliiiiiiiiii 



Eissey: 1986 agreement expired in 1987 



LAND/ 

from front page 

on land provided by FAU in the 1970s, and 
according to a lease agreement, PBCC has an 
option to double the twenty-five acres to fifty 
when, "needed and justified." 

PBCC moved to FAU's main campus in Boca 
Raton, by invitation, in 1970. At the time, 
FAU's program was fed students from Broward 
Community College and PBCC. FAU needed 
PBCC on its campus so that it could offer a 
four -year undergraduate program. 

In 1984, FAU added its own lower-division 
program. PBCC then became an expendable 
competitor. 

In 1982, Eissey signed a lease with FAU 
adding 40 acres to PBCC's then 10 acre cam- 
pus. "The University (FAU) further agrees to 
reserve for future use by the College (PBCC), 
parcels of up to an additional forty (40) acres 
(originally, PBCC was given 10 acres). The 



College (PBCC) may request, when needed and 
Justified, that all or any of the reserved acreage 
be included by the University (FAU) In this 
Lease by amendment," so says the 1982 lease. 

The main objection to PBCC's expansion, 
according to Catanese, as quoted in the Palm 
Beach Post, is the 1986 agreement wherein 
Eissey signed off the 40 acres in exchange for 
$10 million to build the Kravis Center. But in 
a 1990 letter sent to Eissey from Edward Cisek, 
deputy executive director of the State Board of 
Community Colleges, the 1986 agreement, 
"shall expire and be void and inoperative on 
July 1, 1987." 

So it goes. Check, counter -check but no 
checkmate as yet. According to Catanese (from 
the Palm Beach Post), 25 acres is more than 
enough for PBCC at their current size (14,000 
students attend South Campus according to 
Eissey). But, Eissey counters, Catanese just 
asked for 300 acres for FAU's new north campus 



(he received 135) to accommodate less than one 
third (3,000 projected by the year 2000) of the 
students PBCC already accommodates on less 
than a fifth of the land. 

Whatever the result, the game is far from over. 
Currently, and at Eissey's request, Clark Max- 
weU, director of the community college system, is 
■contacting Charles Reed, chancellor of the uni- 
versity system, in hopes of getting the original 
agreement between FAU and PBCC honored. 

As in most political struggles, more heat than 
lightis generated. And accordingto Lynn Larenti, 
Catanese's spokesperson, "we just want Eissey to 
cease and desist. .if more land is needed, then he 
(Eissey) should seek another location for his 
campus." 

Eissey said that he would welcome an outside 
arbiter, an objective third parly, to settle once and 
for all the dispute between PBCC and FAU. At this 
point, both presidents believe each has the ad- 
vantage, but I wouldn't bet on either man laying 
his king over on Its side just yet. In feet, currently 
on the South Campus, a newfy-oonstructed gym- 
nasium is due to open Feb; 19. It joins new 
racquetball and tennis courts, and a new cafete- 
ria ; — a bookstore is in the works. 



U 



FIRST AID/EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 
THE THREE R's" 



:\y^SEIZJURE^;: : :-- -,/\ ■ ' 
(Recognition. /Response' & Rclcrralj 



PBCC student health services and the 
Epilepsy Association of the Palm Beaches 

Feb. 16, 10 a.m. — Glades Campus 

March 16, 11 a.m. — Eissey Campus 

March 22, 2 - 3 p.m. — South Campus 

March 30, 2 - 3 p.m. — Central Campus 

CONTACT: 

MARY CANNON AT 439-8066 



"VMS" OF SPRING MM: A Vim VIM 

SPRING-FUNG FUND-RAISING DANCE 



'^IIIe^^ 



1 f^^SSF'TPSi i 



GAMEROOM 



$3 ADVANCE IN LLRC (EISSEY CAMPUS) 34 AT THE DOOR 

FEATURING DJ HARRY G OF ENTERTAINMENT CONNECTIONS, LASER EFFECTS, FOG, UMBO AND DANCE CON- 
TESTS AND OTHER ACTIVITIES - LIGHT SNACKS AND SOFT DRINKS WILL BE AVAILABLE 

SATURDAY M6HT. FEBRUARY 26 9 P.M. TO 1 A.M. 

FOR MORE INFORMATION — 625-2565 



Now Leasing 



Panther Park 





ems 



CLASS ISONLY 

3MINUTESAWAY 



Palm Beach Community College 
Central Campus 
Lake Worth 



UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 
CALL 582-9100 



Don't forget about qui 

studenjt^ 

Gall Ihe office for details! 




Page 6 



the BEACHCOMBER 



February 16, 1994 





"If old enough during the 
past election, I would have 

voted for Bush because I'm 
a republican. But now, I 
would have to say that I 
would vote for Clinton. I 
like his community service 
program with which young 
people can get a loan for 
school and pay it back 
through community-ser- 
vice work in the field they 
would like to enter. This 
will obviously help the fu- 
ture of this country." 

-Katty Garay, South 
Pre-law Major 




"/ voted for Clinton. I'm a 
middle-class person and 
Clinton recognizes the 
middle-class. I think he's 
still getting his act to- 
gether, though. If he con- 
tinues to improve on the 
middle-class issues, I'd 
vote for him again. " 

-Sherry Dile, Glades 
Radiology Major 




"I like what he 's doing and 
I am satisfied with the re- 
sults of his efforts so far" 

-Adam Williams, Central 



VIE WDINTQ 



February 16, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 7 







If today were election dt would you vote for him? 



"I supported 
Clinton over the 
. last election, Gen- 
erally speaking, I 
think he's going in 
the right direction, 
We need some 
type of universal 
health care. Since 
Harry Truman, no- 
body has had the 
political courage 
or has put the en- 
ergy into propos- 
ing one; you've 
got to give the 
president and first 
lady credit for hav- 
ing come forward 
with some serious 
programs. " 
-Dan O'Connei, Central 
Sociology Professor 




One year ago ... 

TT 7* S 1 * T £C" i 

of office on January 20°19Q? wi>? ^ d < . aug J 1 T ter Chelsea at Itecomes the 42nd president of the United States 
ryzu, lyyjrrom Chief Justice William H. Rehfthe steps of the Capitol. 



— File Photo 
Q* he takes the oath 



Dawn Vince voted 
for Clinton in the 
last election. She 
believed his pro- 
posals for the im- 
provement of 
health care would 
be good for the 
country and her 
chosen profession. 
But she would not 
vote for him again. 
She doesn't feel his 
proposals will help 
her out at all in the 
long run. 

" don't feel his poli- 
cies are helping, 
especially in health 
care." 

-Dawn Vince, Central 
Nusing Major 




"/ would have voted for Clinton had / 
been old enough. The country needed a 
^w voice and he has a lot of new ideas 
» nether or not the new health plan will 
wrk is unknown, but we will never Imovx* 
/ we don't give it a try. The old plan cer- 
tify isn't working. I also like his edu^ 
clonal programs and plans andI W0U l d 
Wejor him next term ifhe runs and there 
W " * s °™eone new whom I like better." 
-Everley Farguharson 
Occupational Therapy Major 



//ill 



"/ believe he talks a good game, but 
his actions don't show it. We are not 
seeing anything constructive 
happenning. " 

(L) -Leanne Darville, North 

Business Major 

"I wouldn't vote for Clinton during 
the next election because I followed 
the campain and I believe he made 
a lot of empty promises." 

(R) -Vincent Lonano, North 








// 



// 






"I wasn't old enough to 
vote, but / can 't believe that 
we elected a man who 
smoked pot and who 
dodged the draft! How 
could we have a president 
who wouldn't fight for his 
country?" 

-Billy Berthiaune, South 
Marine Biology Major 




"I would tell him to keep 
away from extra-marital 
affairs. " 

-James Zala, Central 
Sociology major 




"I voted for Bush. Bush 
had good moral and 
religios standards and tried 
to relate these to the coun- 
try. I feel this is the most 
important issue and is what 
the country is lacking most. 
We must do as much as we 
can to promote Christian 
standards if we are to have 
any hope of backing out of 
this moral disaster we are 
already in." 

-Julie Wilson.Glades 



•% 



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Ji l il' lH lH I' M' I I I I lllilli M'^h m i'l'l i I | I i I n il l I H 



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February 16, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 9 



Page 8 



the BEACHCOMBER 



February 16, 1994 



SPORTC 

fbjl BEACHCOMBER il 



Basketball Panthers ane ranked 13th in the nation 
and squeak by BCC to clinch conference title 

Panthers head for state tournament 



By DAVID P. McDERMOTT 
Stqff Reporter 

The Panthers (23-3, 8-0) rallied from be- 
hind to oust the Broward Community College 
Seahawks in a tight game 78-70, and clinch the 
Southern Conference championship in front of 
a large home crowd on Feb. 5. 

The Seahawks (9-14, 4-4) got off to a fast 
11-2 lead with the help of some sloppy play by 
the Panthers. For the rest of the half, the 
Panthers had to fight and scrape their way back 
into the game. They finally tied the game at the 
end of the first half when #20 Marquis Wright, 
who finished with 12 points, made 1 of 2 free 
throws. 

The Panthers took their first lead with 15:47 
left in the half, on a three-point play by #21 
Bernard Green, who led all scorers with 25 
points. Green also grabbed 13 rebounds to help 
the Panthers dominate the Seahawks on the 
boards 51-34. 

With 13:06 remaining, the Panthers re- 



gained the lead for good 47-43 on a lay-up and 
two free throws by #5 Tyshon Fisher, who 
added 15 points to the Panthers attack. 

Despite the win, Coach Posphical was un- 
happy with the Panthers second straight slow 
start (the first was against Miami-Dade North in 
a game they won 89-83 in overtime) saying, "We 
need to fix that." 

However, Posphical conceeded, "it wasn't 
the best game we've played, but we continue to 
win games. " Finding a way to win games is a big 
reason the Panthers are ranked #1 in the state 
and #13 in the nation. 

The victory also assured PBCC of a trip to 
the Men's State Tournament in Bradenton 
March 3-5. 

The final home games for the men will be 
against Miami/Dade-North Feb. 16 and Bro- 
ward Community College Feb. 19 (the Panthers 
play BCC at PBCC's new South Campus gym- 
nasium at 7:30). 




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Headin' for home — Photo by Rob Gerard 

PBCC Panthers at a recent night game 

Baseball Panthers 
stomp Northwood 

By ROBERT G. GERARD 
Photo Editor 

It was as if Coach Qero's Panthers had an 
axe to grind against Northwood when by the 
bottom of the fourth inning the score was 
already 17-2 - Panthers. PBCC inflelder Jady 
Hill, number 24, blasted two RBI homers, one 

IT*, t S e « c ^ r fleld fence - and the ot her down 
the left Held line. 

Northwood's pitching staff struggled early 
Four consecutive off the plate pitches with the 
bases loaded allowed for some of the scoring, 
but when Northwood's erratic pitchers did 
2^*^1*1* T r &e P late ' ™CC hitters 
the stadium and beyond. 

«. m Z » gan ? es are on W from February 2 
tough April 20. The Panthers record UsXe- 

££ S.%255^ garaes to Manatee CC 

HOME SCHEDULE 
2/ 15 vs Northwood 7:00 pm 
2/ 16 vs Broward 3:00 pm 
2/ 1 7 vs Manatee 4:30 pm 
2/19 vs Valencia 6:00 pm 
-i/22 vs Northwood 7:00 pm 
2/26 vs Miami/Dade-North 9.nn p m 




Women's Tennis SehwiniA 



2/23 

2/25 

2/26 

3/1 

3/3 

3/8 

3/14 



■V 1 7 AWAY :l | Maimi/Dacle Wollson 



AWAY at Barry College 

AWAY at Hillsborough 

AWAY at FCCJ 

HOME vs Lynn University 

AWAY at Broward 

AWAY at Miami/Dade-North 

HOME vs Columbia University 



2:30 
3:00 
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2:00 
2:00 
2:00 
2:00 



3/15 
3/17 
3/21 
3/22 
3/24 
3/29 



AWAY at Miami/Dade-North 

HOME vs FCCJ 

HOMEvsDePaul 

HOME vs Cornell 

HOME vs Dartmouth 

HOME vs Miami/Dade-Wolfson 



i/1P . 17 „„"~ '-"""""/^aae-wolisor 
4/15-17 HOME STATETOURNAMENT 



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•feat) 



Lady Panthers, clinch Southern Conference Championship undefeated. 

BCC no match for PBCC's 75-36 thrashing 



By BAVM) P. McDERMOTT 
Sfcqgf Resporter 

The Lady Panthers (21-5, 9-0) 
continued to roll, shooting down 
the Lady Seahawks of Broward 
Community College 75-36 on their 
way to clinching another South- 



ern Conference Championship. 

PBCC, off to a fast start, took 
a 16-6 lead early in the first half, 
which ended with a 20-5 run, 
giving the Lady Panthers a 43-20 
halftime lead. 

Debra Williams had another 



big night leading all scorers with 25 
points. Williams also grabbed 10 
rebounds (six on offense). Natalie 
Richardson poured in another 22 
points and got eight rebounds of 
her own. The Lady's grabbed a total 
of 46 rebounds! 



Coach Sandra Booker said that 
their defense played well, but they 
still need to work harder to win it 
all. The win also "nets* the Lady 
Panthers an automatic spot at the 
Women's State Tournament in 
Ocala Feb. 28. 



Tack The Gym 9 night a success^ 400-500 students show up for games 

Ken Marion, SGA president, is pleased by response 



By DAVDJ P. McDERMOTT 
Stqff Reporter 

"Dr. Eissey loves how it (Pack 
The Gym) is going," said Student 
Government President Ken Marion. 

Eissey acknowledged that he 
feels strongly about Pack The Gym 
and other student activities such as 
drama, music and art. He said, 
"This is a great opportunity to get to 
know other students." 

Knowing this, Marion has taken 



it upon himself to get more stu- 
dents interested in the men's and 
women's basketball teams by offer- 
ing door prizes and holding con- 
tests during halftime. Based on the 
turnout so far, Marion has done a 
greatjob. On Jan. 22, between 450- 
500 people came out for Pack The 
Gym II, according to Marion. That 
total was easily surpassed at Pack 
The Gym III Feb. 6, when the men 
and women each clinched their 



Southern Conference Championships. 

Women's Coach, Sandra Booker 
said she could not complain because 
he (Marion) is getting people out to the 
games. Booker said that in the three 
years she has been coaching at PBCC, 
this is the first time people have started 
to show up early to watch the women 
play. 

It has been such a success that 
Pack The Gym IV is already in the 
works. 



Pack The Gym IV will be held on 
Feb. 19, when PBCC hosts its final 
home game of the year against Bro- 
ward Community College. It will be 
the first-ever home game at the new 
gym on PBCC's South Campus in 
Boca Raton. 

This will give even more stu- 
dents a chance to get out and see the 
Panthers play. According to Eissey, 
the biggest turnout yet is expected, 
so get out an join the fun. 



The Blaze continue to suffer losses 

Last years high scorer's gone 

By JUSTM KNAPFEL 
Sports Editor 

The West Palm Beach Blaze suffered a major loss during the week of 
Jan. 24. Last season's scoring leader, Scott Garrow, left the team for 
Chadham of the Colonial Hockey League. 

In Chadham, Garrow was reunited with last year's teammates Jamie 
Dabanovich and Rob Wilson. Before leaving the Blaze, Garrow racked up 
a total of 46 points in 3 1 games — including 22 goals 24 assists. 

Don Stone replaced Garrow as first line Center. In his first game, Stone 
helped his team overcome a 4- 1 deficit by scoring a hat trick that ignited 
the Blaze to a 6-4 comeback win over Lakeland. Defenseman Shaun Imber 
had three assists, and Pino Chiappetta scored the final empty-net goal. 

Goalie Kelly Dyer started the game, but Mike Gregorio took over when 
Lakeland was up 3- 1 . Dyer saved 1 1 of 14 shots, and Gregorio saved 17 of 
18 shots. 

In Daytona Beach, the Blaze's Rob Celotto scored four goals in their 8- 
3 victory." Dyer got her first start and first win stopping 18 of 21 shots. 

After a game in Jacksonville, Goalie Todd Bojcun was examined and 
discovered he needed surgeiy on his knee. He may be back at the end of 
Feb. The Blaze lost to J'ville in a shootout. Daniel Vinetti scored a goal and 
had two assists. 

The Jacksonville Bullets' hot streak brought them within one 
point ofthe first place Blaze (23-11-2). The Bullets (23-ll-l)have 
some of the hottest players. Joey Musa, Brian Gruning, Mark 
Thompson, and Mike Marcinkiewicz are all among the leading 
scorers. Blaze home games are on Feb. 25 vs. Jacksonville, Feb. 
26 and March 5 vs. Daytona Beach and March 1 1 vs. Lakeland. 



1994 SOFTBALL SCHEDULE 


2/22 HOME vs Miami/ Dade-Kendall 


3:00 


2/24 HOME vs Miami/Dade-North 


3:00 


3/3 AWAY at Edison 


3:00 


3/8 HOME vs Broward 


3:00 


3/10 AWAY at Miami/Dade-Kendall 


3:00 


3/11-12 AWAY at Broward Tournament 


TRA 


3/15 AWAY at Miami/Dade-North 


3:00 


3/ 1 8-20 AWAY at Santa Fe Tournament 


TBA 


3/24 HOME vs Edison 


3:00 


j 3/29 AWAY at Broward 


3:00 


1 4/1-2 AWAY at FCCJ 


TBA 


I 4/22-23 at Orlando for STATE TOURNAMENT 


I TBA 




I 5/5-7 at Lake City for NJCAATOURNAMENTTBA 



TYPIST WITH LASER PRINTER 
LOOKING FOR WORK 

FAST, RELIABLE AND REASONABLE!' 
CALL SHERRY 
HOME OFFICE: (407) 852-0131 



DOS 5.0/6.0 SEMINAR 

FEBRUARY 24, 1994 at 7:00 p.m. in BA 203 

(CENTRAL CAMPUS) 

$15 for currently enrolled students & employees 

$20 for General Public 

FREE for DPMA Student Chapter Members 

Contact Mary Kelly McWaters at 439-8306 



ii 



4TO.424 




WINTER TERM WORKSHOPS 

AM \OF MTEMVJBWm® 

Febrmsy I 5:00 * 6:30 

ComtimniBg Ed Kooim 123 
April 5 5:00 - 6:30 

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February 8 5:30 - 6:30 
March 21 5:30 - 6:30 

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Page 10 



the BEACHCOMBER 



February 16, 1994 



ENTERTAINMENT 

JL*^ BEACHCOMBER -JL 




£, R/BJc© PucctaieUt, John Paul Soars, J.C. Dwyer and Tommy Buckley. 



Local metal band 
strikes a chord 



ByCMUSHARRSS 
Entertainment Editor 
Ra ped Ape "Temy faa l Reality" 
With more ialent on this EP than most major-label 
metal bands have on their entire CD, Raped Ape have 
put the West Palm Beach area on the map as a growing 
source of music. Their latest offering. Terminal Real- 
ity," is brilliantly produced by Scott Burns (Obituary, 
Sepultura) with such breathtaking songs as "Victim Of 
The Game," and "Land Of BrokenPromises." Although 
the band tends to jam a little too much on some of the 
songs and the vocals are sometimes unintelligible 
(isn't that often the case with metal bands, though?), 
this EP is definitely worth seeking out at local music 
stores. To hear a preview of the EP, call Raped Ape's 
hotline at 471-2642. 



File photo 



Human rights is the real issue in 'Philadelphia' 

Plague of the 1990s is no laughing matter 



By D.S.ULLERY 
Entertainment Editor 

"Miguel," he whispers, his 
voice barely audible as he stares 
up at his lover from the hospital 
bed, "I'm ready." 

That is a line that is delivered 
near the conclusion of the 
Jonathan Demme film "Philadel- 
phia," and it is uttered by the 
talented actor Tom Hanks, who 
has spent just under two hours 
breathing life into his character, 
one Andrew Beckett, a young law- 
yer dying of AIDS who is fired 
from — and subsequently in court 
against — a prestigious law firm. 
Hanks is at his very best here 
and the comic ability he displays 
so often is untapped in his strive 
for sheer drama. It works, and, as 
a result, the character is so be- 
lievable that by the time that fate- 
ful line is uttered, I was in tears 
Denzel Washington is also on 
hand as a homophobic lawyer who 
is at first disgusted by Hanks 
then realizes that, his personal 
prejudices aside, this is a man 
who has suffered the humiliating 
scars of discrimination. 

The film doesn't just tell that 
story of how these two men grow 
to respect one another, but it also 
speaks volumes about the neces- 
sity of recognizing human rights 
Yes, you read it correctly — 
human rights. Not gay rights. Not 



the rights of people who have 
contracted HIV, but human 
rights. There's been a great deal 
of press concerning the message 
of this 



"Philadelphia" is that rarest of 
all achievements — a wonder- 
ful film that truly deserves to 
be referred to as "important." 
It is important, and it is all the 
more powerful because of that. 



film, how 
the film is 
the first 
motion 
picture to 
really 
make a 
state- 
ment 
about the 
rights of 

homo- „«««________,,,_____ 

sexuals, ■""*■"-----■ — — — — — 

but I think "Philadelphia" says 
more than that. There's one mo- 
ment during this film where a 
woman who used to work at the 
same law firm that fired Andy is 
testifying on his behalf, describ- 
ing the embarrassment she felt 
when her co-workers treated her 
with disgust upon discovering 
that she had in fact contracted 
the dreaded HIV virus. Her char- 
acter was unfortunate enough to 
have received the disease via a 
tainted blood transfusion — she's 
heterosexual and practiced safe 
sex, but she contracted the dis- 
ease anyway. In that moment, my 
suspicions were confirmed — this 
film isn't just saying that we 
should recognize that rights of 



gays and people with AIDS — it's 
saying that we should recognize 
everybody's rights, no matter 
what their personal circum- 
stances. 



"Phila- 
delphia" 
does, 
however, 
address 
the topic 
o f 

Ixmcphcba, 
and it 
makes a 
___________ strong 

point in 
revealing that gay men and 
women — despite their sexual 
orientation — have the same 
wants and needs as the rest of us. 
There's one exhilarating moment 
where 
Hanks, 
who has 
Washing- 
ton in his 
apart- 
ment so 
they can 
go over 
their 
case, 
plays his 
favorite 
aria for 
the law- 



yer. Then he takes Washington 
through it line by line, until the 
opera ends and the audience is 
emotionally drained. 

Washington's reaction during 
the scene is beautiful — without 
uttering a word he suddenly un- 
derstands that despite his homo- 
sexuality, Andy Beckett can ap- 
preciate life and beauty just as 
well as he himself can. 

That, and the pursuit of jus- 
tice are the central themes of this 
amazing motion picture. 

Director Demme has once 
again proven his uncanny skill 
at displaying the true nature of 
the human spirit. The last time 
was the award winning "Silence 
of the lambs." In that picture 
Demme painted a stark and 
frightening portrait of just how- 
evil men can be. This time he 



J>^ C£c*# 



tm&mmmB 



PBCO(mTl]mARTSCALEffl)AR _ 

1 1 Q^fV'? 5 - Exhibiti0n: "Between Friends," a photographic reflection of the 

Hornwl ^? er * Wil1 ^ shwon on the first floor of the PBCC Central Campus 
Harold c. Manor Library, Admission is free. For further information, call (407) 439- 

March 1-31... Exhibition: An exhibit featuring works by School of the Arts 
a*ms will be displayed on the second floor of the same library A *with "Between 
Friends, adm.ssion is free. For more information, call (407) 439-81 14 

B nmSn iJfcS" ? a A Swing Era concert wil! be held * the Watson 

Mrt^ fZ ISfE®"? Perform ance: "Steel Bandits", a vocal/dance group, will 

otTc^te L JfmP CU,tUral ArtS Center ° n *» PBCC G,ades Campuses 

^''GladesrLnlf -^^^^^^^tion, call the box office at(407)992-6160. 

Jtegjades Campus is located at 1977 College Drive in Belle Glade. 



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February 16, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 11 



FEATURE? 



BEACHCOMBER 



Student Services lends disabled students a hand 



By STACEY SKINNER 
Stqff Reporter 

A shocking statement was made by Ellvlo 
Serrano during a chat with him last week. 
Serrano, district coordinator of student ser- 
vices for all lour PBCC campuses said. There 
are three major problems facing disabled stu- 
dents when they enter college, lack of prepara- 
tion, lack of resources and lack of awareness." 
His motivation for starting the program was the 
need he saw. In 1991, tt became evident to him 
that there was support needed for disabled 
students. During the 1989-90 school year, 
there was a total of 60 disabled students on all 
four campuses. Today, that number has In- 
creased to over 450 students. 

Who is disabled? Anyone who has the 
following: 

1) A physical or mental Impairment which sub- 
stantially limits one or more major life activity 
(cancer, hearfdisease, diabetes, cerebral palsy, 
epilepsy and muscular dystrophy are included) . 

2) A record of such impairment (record consists 
of history of an impairment or a misclassiflcation 
as having an Impairment). 

3) A person regarded as having such an "im- 
pairment" (persons who do not have a physical 



"Do not be afraid to declare a 
disability because we want you 
to succeed and to support your 

efforts in any way that we can." 

— Ellvlo Serrano 



or mental Impairment, ie: a disfiguring scar or 
a limp). 

PBCC provides counselors on each ol lis 
four campuses to help disabled students, fhe 
system of providing counseling services to dis- 
abled students varies from campus to campus. 
PBCC strives to meet the needs of all qualified 
disabled students, and, yes, students must be 
qualified in order to receive help. A disabled 
student is responsible for supplying the college 
with supporting documentation such as psy- 
cho-educational evaluation, and pertinent medi- 
cal records that are no more than three years 
old. Once a student has been accepted, reason- 
able accommodations will be made for the stu- 
dent so that they can have the opportunity to 
succeed. Accommodations include: interpret- 



ers, readers, lab assistants, special testing, test 
writers, taped books, notetakers, oral tests and 
visual technicians. 

A major concent for students Is primacy. 
The Student Services program guarantees con- 
fidentiality, and the campus adviser asks per- 
mission of all accepted students before com- 
municating disabilities to members of the fac- 
ulty. No student is turned down. Ifyouhavea 
disability, and can show documentation, then 
you will be accepted. 

Because Student Services works on a case- 
by-case basis, the waiting list is quite long. 
Each student has unique needs: so. the cam- 
pus adviser needs to look into each case sepa- 
rately, but the wait is worth it. 

At the close of the Interview, the impact of 
the help that Serrano lends to students was a 
remarkable gift; the gift of understanding. Just 
because a student has a disability doesn't mean 
that they can't contribute something wonder- 
ful. 

"Many .major contributors to our nation 
were disabled ; Nelson Rockefellar the vice presi- 
dent of the United States couldn't write," Serrano 
said. 

Everyone deserves a chance at success. 

Serrano added, "Do not be afraid to declare 
a disability because we want you to succeed 
and to support your efforts In any way that we 
can," 



It 9 s as easy as puling teeth 

Smile, you may be on 'Candid Camera' 

By LOVRA LAFAYETTE 
Stqff Reporter 

DENTISTS!! Just mention the word and most people break-out in a 
cold sweat. But did you know that by following a dental-hygiene program 
now, that you could save time, money and misery later on? It's true. And 
PBCC has the program and the people to help you. 

Students of the Dental Hygiene Program (DHP) are specially trained 
to get you on a program of preventive care with treatment based on your 
individual needs. Nancy MacPherson (RDH), is program leader of the 
DHP. 

'The biggest thing we can do for you is evaluate your needs, and to 
get you on a program of oral hygiene that you can do at home," McPherson 
said. 

The program offers complete evaluation and preventive care services 
to employees and students of PBCC as well as to those in the community. 
Services include: complete oral examination, X-Rays, flouride treatment, 
sealants, irrigation, and root planing (deep scaling), as well as instruc- 
tions for proper flossing and brushing techniques and individualized oral 
care. Dental referral is also provided. The DHP offers these services to 
PBCC employees and students for only $5 and to the community for only 
$15. Children under 18 years ofage cost even less. The fee is paid on your 
first visit and covers any subsequent visits until your treatments are 




f 



Don't have sex in the dark. 

If you're in the dark about things like safer sex 
and sexually transmitted diseases, you better 
brighten up. 

Before you get hurt, get smart. Come to 
Planned Parenthood. We'll teach you all about 
safer sex and provide you with testing and treat- 
ment of sexually transmitted diseases, HIV test- 

ing and counseling, gynecological care, pregnancy testing and coun- 
seling, and much more. 

We'll help you feel comfortable and secure and answer all your 
questions in plain, straight talk. We're affordable and everything is 

confidential. „ ■„_'.■ 

Make the smart choice. Come to Planned Parenthood. 




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"What big teeth you have ..." — Photo b y Bria n Peftle y 



finished, and you are established in your own personal oral hygiene 
program. 

MacPherson, though, stresses, "We are not trying to be in competi- 
tion with local dentist offices." The services are offered as part of the 
instructional-training program for the students of the DHP. Each 
student earns a grade according to their evaluation and treatment of each 
patient they see. 

The fee covers the cost of materials only, and the students are not paid 
for their services. Tracy Lynn Anderson, a student in her final semester 
of the program says, "People like the thorough treatment they get here." 
Cathy Miceli, also in her final semester adds, "Our clinics are very helpful 
to those who maybe can't afford to go to a regular dentist's office for 
preventive care of this type." 

For your protection as well as the protection of the students, the 
Dental Hygiene clinics follow the "universal precautions" practice of 
wearing gloves, masks, disposable gowns, and the sterilizing of instru- 
ments and supplies. 

"It's, like being in a plastic bubble," said Tracy. The DHP at PBCC is 
accredited by the ADA Commission on Dental Accreditation and I s 
approved by the Florida State Board of Dentistry. Teaching methods now 
in effect are mandated by the Department of Education, State of Florida, 
the American Dental Association, Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and 
the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). A Doctor of 
Dentistry is available at every clinic for consultation, and instructors 
oversee the students evaluation and treatment of each patient. 

During the current semester, the program offers clinics each week from 
Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to noon, and from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m- 
Appointments must be made by calling DHP secretary Mrs. Warne at 439- 
8097, or leave a message with your name, age and phone number. 

Be prepared to spend a little extra time at the clinic, especially on your 
first visit, as a complete medical history will be taken along with your oral 
exam and evaluation. MacPherson encourages patients to bring a sweater 
along as it is usually cool inside. She invites people of the community and 
PBCC to take advantage of the services being offered at the clinics. "Our; 
first graduating class was in 1 964, and clients have been coming here since ■ 
the program started, bringing their children and even their grandcnil-* 






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Page 12 



the BEACHCOMBER 



February 16, 1994 



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THE CROSSWORD 



AMPHIBIAN REVENGE FANTASIES 



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9 Part of a 

dance? 

12 Tropical plant 

13 Small fly 

14 Work by Frost 

15 Judicial decree 

17 Impolite 

18 "Ben — " 

19 Yeltsin's land: 
abbr. 

20 Fee 

22 Delivered 

23 Break into 
pieces 

24 Meager 

26 Uses a razor 

27 Obese 

28 Backbone 

29 Certain actor 

32 Newman or 
Lynde 

33 Indicate 

34 Office need 

35 Schedule abbr. 

36 Speak 

37 Above: pref. 

38 Domingo and 
Pavarotti 

40 Steed 

41 Knaves, old 
style 

43 Unruffled 

44 Kay Thompson 
heroine 

45 Ago 

46 Oolong 

49 Cross 

50 Open areas 

53 Capitol's roof 

54 Wearies 

55 Food regimen 

56 Suppositions 

57 Coaster 

58 Sp. lady 

DOWN 

1 Classical 
composer 

2 Name of 
baseball 
brothers 

3 Tart 

4 Always, to a 
bard 



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81994 Tribune Media Services. Inc. 
All Rights Reserved 



5 Initial 

6 Chances 

7 Ripen 

8 Vendor 

9 Wooings 

10 Row of shrubs 

11 Eastern VIP 

13 Steed 

14 Chatter 
16 Eng. river 

21 Own 

22 Writer Bellow 

23 Glow 

24 Night sight 

25 Trial places 

26 Barbecue 
equipment 

27 Health farm 

28 Rises high 

30 To shelter 

31 Mai de — 

33 Shields 

34 Roll up, as a 
flag 

36 Individuals 

37 Grimy 

39 Omit a syllable 



ANSWERS 



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FEBRUARY 2. PTTZZT.F. 



40 Party givers 

41 "Aida" 
composer 

42 Distant 

43 Had concern 
45 Unsullied 



46 Threesome 

47 Biblical garden 

48 The Thin Man's 
dog 

51 Grease 

52 Total 




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•tS&BMfc-? 

'COULD BE THE ANTI-GUN LORRY AMn THF mba adc ttTrmr* rmeco iw5i=tli*« 



Angry parents stop latest assault 
on parental rights; the Miller 
amendment is overwhelmingly 
defeated. 



See Page 2 



(Press A>so t ?>* ion 




1993 bBT DESIGN 

THIRD PLACt/SfATE Ot" TLORIDA 



PBGC Spring Jazz Festival 
hosted by Professor Sy Pryweller 
is a swingin' success. 

- See Page 10 



Volume 54 Number 14 PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE ♦ LAKE WORTH, FLORIDA 



5j^f '. 



March 29, 1994 



Former president of Roosevelt Junior College, Britton G. 
Sayles, leaves behind niiiiy^anged lives and many friends 



...he will reiri^ln, in the^-%*^ 
thoughts andhearfet^fl^^se 
■who were touched by his life 
and his quiet strength of 
character that carried him. 
through a long and distin- 
guished career. 



By MIKE MTSEFF 
Editor 

Nearly one year ago 
PBCC's board of trustees 
honored Britton G. Sayles 
by naming its central cam- 
pus social science build- 
ing after him. Board 
Chairmen Bettye J. King 
said that, 'This is a very, 
very special day for PBCC; 
we are making things 
right." 

Mr. Sayles' name was 
immortalized for his con- 
tribution to his commu- ' ~ 
nity and to his time, but, 

sadly, Mr. Sayles recently slipped from our presence and into God's. 
Though not physically here, he will remain in the thoughts and hearts of 
those who were touched by his life and his quiet strength of character 
that carried him through a long and distinguished career. A career that 
began in the twilight of segregation. 

But looking beyond the pernicious side of racial inequality, Mr. 
Sayles brought to young Afican-American's opportunity for advance- 
ment, and the chance to make a better life for themselves through 
education. Mr. Sayles believed that if a student attended class, respected 
the teacher and persevered in studies, achievement would follow. Con- 
trolling their own destinies was the message, and it challenged and 
transformed many students' young lives. 

Born and raised in Washington, D.C. where he attended public 
school, he later earned his bachelor's and master's degrees at Howard 
University. In 1937 he taught English at Florida Memorial College, which 
was then located in St. Augustine, and later became its dean. In 1951, 
after four years as principal of Everglades Vocational High School, Belle 
Glade's black high school, he was named principal of Roosevelt High 
School, one of Palm Beach County's three senior high schools for blacks. 
Principal of the school for 15 years, he added the presidency of West Palm 
Beach's Roosevelt Junior College (RJC) to his duties from 1958 to 1965. 
Initially begun to forestall integretion of then Palm Beach Junior College, 
RJC merged with PBJC in 1965. He became a district administrator and 
rose to north area superintendent of Palm Beach County schools in 1 973 . 
Mr. Sayles retired from the position in 1979. PBCC joins with his wife 
Theodosia in mourning his passing — he will be missed. 




In God's embrace... 

Mr. Britton G. Sayles: educators lose one of their own. 



H 



PBCC South 
Campus student, 
Mae Nielander^ is a 
finalist for the 
Florida College 
Student of the Year 

Special to the Beachcomber 

PBCC South Campus stu- 
dent Mae Nlelander was selected 
as one of seven finalists for the 
Florida College Student of the Year 
Award. The winner of the award 
will be announced April 8. 
Nielander was one of 20 outstand- 
ing campus leaders chosen from 
universities, private colleges, com- 
munity colleges and other schools 
throughout Florida, 



The 1994 winners will share 
more than $30,000 in scholarships 
and prizes from First Unio n Na- 
tional Bank of Florida, Winn-Dixie, 
Sony Corporation, EDS and other 
sponsors. Winners will be featured 
in the "Florida College Student of 
the Year" issue of Florida Leader 
magazine published in April. 

Nielander, former president 
and current treasurer of Phi Theta 
Kappa (the community college hon- 
ors society) was selected for her 
leadership and service to the col- 
lege and the community. She has 
participated in tutoring programs 
through Cities and Schools, she 
volunteers in the PBCC South 
Campus Center for Personalized 
Instruction, has hosted craft tours 
for children at the Boca Raton Art 
Museum and writes occasionally 
for the Beachcomber, PBCC's stu- 
dent newspaper. 

This summer, Nielander Is 
planning to attend classes at 
Florida.Atlantic University. 



Robert Bolt's A Man For All Seasons 
christen's Eissey Campus Auditorium 

Ribbon-cutting ceremony draws dignitaries 



By MIKE MTTSBFF 
Editor 

Friday night, March 18, the 
opening night ribbon cutting for 
the new PBCC Eissey Campus Au- 
ditorium, brought together digni- 
taries and visionaries. And as do 
all endeavors, they begin with a 
thought, an ethereal scene, amisty, 
shifting vision of what could be. 
Then, in retrospect, what seems to 
have been only a few moments 
later, (actually years) the dream 
becomes reality. The years spent 
clearing the mists, firming the shift- 
ing shapes, and convincing others 
that the scene you have described 
was no mere flight of fancy to be 



dismissed. And when it's accom- 
plished, it seems, suddenly, worth 
doing all over again. 

From vacant fields to fulfilled 
dreams. Concrete and steel, glass, 
glitter and guts, the yet unnamed 
auditorium stands stark and proud 
upon a once-barren field illumi- 
nating the night air - its been 
called the Kravis Center North - 
though its cost was ten percent 
that of the Kravis. The edifice is 
impressive, expressive and inter- 
esting. And thanks to the John D- 
and Catherine T. MacArthur 

Please see/AUDITORiUM 
page * 



EfiSS! 



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wmuMi*mwwmtmausnmaju*MJ*M B uaHuu u j!i i m n m i m 'nu.i i i iiiii uu. i .-i; 



Page 2 



toe BEACHCOMBER March 29, 1 994 




Miler amendment is defeated! 

Angry parents jam Whitewater, er...Whitehouse 
switchboard; Congress overwhelmed by response 

By SOKE MTTSEFF 
Editor 

Two weeks ago in the Beachcomber, I wrote an editorial warning of an 
attempt by Rep. George Miller (D) California to insert, stealthily, an 
amendment to House Resolution 6 (HR 6). HR 6, you'll recall, is an 
omnibus education bill reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act of 1965. Also, it's the largest piece of education legislation 
in U.S. history, and the major entry point of the federal government into 
education. HR 6 contains 886 pages (out of 991) of new language not 
found in the original 1965 act. Not only does HR 6 arbitrarily, and 
without local imput (read: parents, local school boards etc.), set national 
teacher -certification standards for public schools, but thanks to Rep. 
Miller, his quietly-inserted amendment would have also included private 
and home-school teachers under the authority of the federal government 
as well. 

To protect private schools and parents who home school, Rep. Dick 
Armey (R) Texas proposed an amendment in committee explicitly exclud- 
ing private and homeschools from the reach of HR 6. But his amendment 
was voted down by the Democrats on a unanimous vote. 

But, due to Christian radio, the word got out and enough outraged 
parents and private-school advocates dialed up the Whitehouse to 
express their "disappoint" over the Miller amendment to defeat it. 
Hundreds ofthousands of phone calls swamped Washington's switch- 
board over a 48 hour period last week, and, as a result, Congress voted 
424 - 1 to accept the Armey amendment, much to the chagrin of Rep. 
Miller who cast the only nay vote (talk about arrogant). 

Rep. Miller had even sent a memo to the members of Congress before 
they voted for the Armey amendment. In it he said: "Dear collegues, 
Congressional offices have recently been beseiged by phone calls from 
parents who educate their children at home, plus others in the home- 
school community, these callers have been victimized by scare tactics 
designed to further the political agenda of the far right. They misrepre- 
sent the legislation (HR 6) that they are calling about." 

But Rep. Miller was quoted in the Washington Post shortly after the 
vote, and he expressed his concern that unqualified parents would be 
teaching their children at home (Scare tactics? I think not). 

Recently, the all-wise federal government decided that students 
should be taught to choreograph a dance routine by the time they 
graduate from high school among other, er, shall we say, non-academic 
pursuits. Reading, writing, grammar or mathematics? why, are they 
really necessary to the development of a child? Not unless you have 
actual education in mind, butifyou have a different agenda.... Their goal 
is not to do what parents aren't doing, but they want to shove parents 

a ^ ^ *? f ° r them '" Said former Con gressman Bob McCuen, and he 
added, I believe that this is going to help spark choice around the 
country, parents have the right to direct the education of their children." 



Get on the Fast Track at 
- Florida Atlantic University! 

Weekend 

Bachelor of 

Business 

Administration 1 




• Classes Meet on Saturdays 
•AACSB Accredited •■' 
•Financial Aid Available* 



Find out if you qualify today ! 
Call Peter Goumas, Program Coordinator, 
at (407) 367-2709. 



Editor/Layout 
Sports Editor 
Entertainment Editor 
Photography Editor 
Advertising Manager 



the BEACHCOMBER 



„ I9f3 — 

Florida Community College Press Association 

Award Winners 

— - George P. Reii — 

First plate Best Arts Review 4 

Second place Mepth deporting. 

-— Robert G, Gerard — 

Third place Sports Photo, 

— Beachcomber — 

Third place Design/Layout 



Mike MltacO' 

JustlnKnapfel 

D,S. Ullcry 

.Robert Gerard 

K. Daniel Prussman 



Contributing Reporters 

Troy Crago, K, Danld Prusmnan, Stacey Skinner, Mike Glamatt, 
Daniel Moon, David P. McDermott 
Loura lafeyctte, Doug Shupe, Stephanie Tookca and Chris Harris 

Opinions expressed in the Beachcomber do not necessarily reflect 
the views of the Beachcomber or Palm Beach Community College. 
Letters to the Editor must be signed. 




Palm Beach Community College 
BEACHCOMBER 
4200 Congress Avenue 
Dr. Edward Eissey Lake Worth, FL 33461-4796 

President/Publisher (407) 439-8064 Fax (407) 439-8210 




Ms, Vicki Scheurer 
Faculty Adviser 



Farrakhan visits 
West Palm Beach, 
and delivers his 
brand of "ministry" 

By RONALD ANTONLN 
FAU Correspondent 

We can talk about Louis 
Farrakhan, but I will not spend my 
time and energy bashing a man who 
has the guts to take a tough position 
and stand by it. It's not that I agree 
with all he says, 




Photo by Mike Mltseff 
He loves to be hated... 

Louis Farrakhan, flanked by his 

body guards, emphasizes a point. 



but I respect 
him for his 
courage and 
the good he has 
done for many 
black people. 
Instead of call- 
ing Farrakhan 
names, I will 
look at what 

could be the reasonbehind his teach- 
ing. 

In his West Palm Beach speech 
on Friday March 4, 1994, he re- 
ferred to the Koran, the Muslim Bible, 
to support his position on relations 
between the Jewish and black com- 
munities. According to Scripture, 
Farrakhan said, the Jews believe 
the black race is the result of God's 
curse, and, he also said, the Jews 
believe the black people were put on 
Earth to serve the white race. So, 
according to Farrakhan, the Jews 
played a role in the enslavement of 
the black people. 

Maybe Farrakhan is not aware 
of the many people, whites and Jews, 
who were and still are friends to 
African-Americans and partners in 
their struggles — in America and all 
over the world . Or maybe Farrakhan 
doesn't have any white or Jewish 
friends like other blacks do. What- 
ever the reason, maybe it would 
help if Minister Farrakhan took a 
pilgrimage Mecca — to re-live 
Malcolm Xs experience. After all, 
Malcolm Xs approach to helping his 
black brothers and sisters had 
changed when he returned from 
Mecca, but his mission remained 
the same. 

Farrakhan touched on many 
good points in his speech on Friday 
in regard to "black on black" crime. 
Farrakhan is right when he says, 
"It's easy for blacks to pull the trig- 
ger on other blacks because they 



So, accordtngto Farrakhan, 
the Jews played a role in 
the enslavement of the 
black people. 



were made to 
hate their 
blackness." I 
can't argue 
with him when 
he says, 

"blacks need to 
__„„____._„___ do more for 
"■"—"-" — — — — themselves so- 
cially, spiritu- 
ally and economically." I would 
agree with many things he said, but 
I would not create for myself the 
enemies he creates for himself by 
looking out for his people. But I can 
see why I would not challenge 
Farrakhan. . ' 

I belong to the group of blacks 
who turn their heads when they see 
black-homeless people instead of 
making it my problem. I belong to 
the group of blacks who give up on 
"black on black" crimes because we 
can't face the challenge. I belong to 
the group of blacks who have white 
friends, Jewish friends and who 
approve of inter-racial marriages 

For that matter, I can only call 
Farrakhan a tough leader, but I 
would not dare call him any bad 
names. Maybe what we hear about 
Farrakhan now is the same as what 
used to be said about Malcolm X 
even after his death. But things are 
changing in regard to Malcolm X 
the media is looking for those who 
killed Malcolm X. After all, did not 
Warner Brothers and Spike Lee's 
movie Malcolm X portray the image 
of an appealing black man to the 
white audience? 

What will be said of Farrakhan 
when he will no longer be in this 
world? As Farrakhan said in his 
speech, he is on time and he will be 
here for as long as the God who sent 
hirn wants him to. We will have to 
wait to see what the future will hold 
fertile image ofMinisterFarrakh^ 



March 29, 1 994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 3 




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Page 4 



the BEACHCOMBER March 29, 1994 




AfEWSl 

I if the Beachcomber ^ JP 



SGA Secretary resigns under threat of Impeachment 



Central Campus SGA President, Ken Marion, 
accepts resignation of secretary Debbie Griffin 



By STACEY SKINNER 

Staff Reporter ... 

Debbie Griffin, former central campus student 
government association secretary, described her feel- 
ings on the afternoon of Feb. 28 as disbelief, shock 
and sadness. It was during an SGA executive board 
meeting that the president of SGA, Ken Marion, 
handed Griffin a let- 



According to Griffin, her threatened im- 
peachment by Marion was unconstitutional 
according to the PBGC Central Campus Stu- 
dent Government Association Constitution. 



ter asking for her 
resignation. In it, 
Marion detailed his 
objections concern- 
ing Griffin's job per- 
formance. 

• Minutes not 
being ready before 
meetings ■ ■ ■ ■ ' ; ■ 

begin 

• Coming late to meetings 

• Temper tantrums during meetings 
•Leaving meetings early 

• Refusing to perform reasonable duties 

Also, according to Marion, Griffin had a problem 
getting along with other student government mem- 
bers. And he believed that her failure to communicate 
or to get along with others (SGA members) weakened 
student government. Therefore, Marion said, he 
acted in the best interests of the SGA and asked for 
her resignation. "I felt that it was necessary but 
unfortunate," explained Marion. 

But Griffin maintains that she has been asked to 
resign on grounds that are, in her opinion, false. And 
according to her, evidence supporting her innocence 
disproves Marion's allegations. Griffin rebutted the 
allegations one at a time: 1) She never missed taking 
the minutes; 2) her so-called temper tantrum oc- 
curred during an informal meeting at a Florida Junior 
College Student Government Association (FJCSGA) 



conference because, "SGA advisor Mitchell Kass put a 
hold on all the telephone lines," and "I asked him, 
'Why don't we just take that off? We're responsible 
adults; we can take care of all our phone calls, but he 
just skipped over it." Griffin admits that she, "became 

upset, not angry, just 
upset because he al- 
lowed someone else 
to explain what I was 
trying to say and that 
got me a little more 
upset, so I just got 
up and walked out." 
Other than that 

incident, according 

to Griffin, she has 
never thrown a temper tantrum or left a meeting 
before it was over. When asked about refusing to 
perform her duties Griffin responded with a slight 
laugh, "I am very artistic. I know how to make a poster 
without being told how to make a poster. Ken asked 
me to do a poster a certain way one time and I told him 
'Well Ken, I don't think it. should be done like this 
because I really like doing it a certain way and you're 
trying to tell me that I have to use stencils to do a 
poster and it takes too much time to use stencils. I 
really don't have that much time so I think I just wont 
do it.'" 

According to Griffin, her threatened impeachment 
by Marion was unconstitutional according to the 
PBCC Central Campus Student Government Associa- 
tion 'Constitution. In a letter to Dean of Student 



AUDITORIUM/ 

from front page 

dation, the land valued at $1.8 
million was donated to PBCC for 
the auditorium. 

From the box office it's just a 
short walk to the elevator, for those 
who prefer riding, or, for the rest of 
us, it's up steps flanking the box 
office. Either way, you enter into 
the upper levels of the auditorium 
where high balconies surround a 
cavernous lobby enclosed entirely 
by glass. Faculty artists displayed 
their works on this night, opening 
night, in the deliberate exhibit 
space of the brightly lit, luxurious 
lobby. 

"For a kid from Brooklyn, this 
place is Paradise," said Dr. Barry 
Russal, communications profes- 
sor and director of Northstage (the 
Eissey Campus theatre group). 
Seen as a collaboration of commu- 
nity needs and an educational fa- 
cility, it's only fitting that the open- 
ing night production of Robert 
Bolt's A Man, For All Seasons be 
performed by The Spotlite Players 




Ok. One, two, three... 

(L-R) PBCC Trustees Vice Chair 
John Salisbury and City of Palm 
Beach Gardens Mayor David 
Clark cut the ribbon to open the 
inaugural performance at Eissey 
Campus Auditorium. 



Please see SGA/ 
page 5 



(the community theatre of Palm 
Beach Gardens) and Northstage - 
their ninth joint production. 

'This is the culmination of all 
our efforts, we hope that it's the 
beginning of a long association," 
said Hank Gonzalez, Producer and 
a director of The Spotlite Players. 

The production was a family 
affair for the PBCC Eissey Campus 
staff. Senior instructor of commu- 
nications Diana Kilpatrick went to 
Rochester, New York to obtain spe- 
cial fabrics and materials donated 
by adjunct faculty member Elena 
Goldfeder. Eissey Campus word- 
processing center leader Patricia 
L. Brohawn was credited with as- 
sisting Kilpatrick with the elabo- 
rate period costumes. 

Adjunct faculty member Joe 
Scaduto provided the original 
musical score for the production. 

On Saturday, April 23, at 10:00 
a.m. to 4:00 p.m., an open house 
will be held for the community to 
get a close-up tour of the new 
theatre. 




m&m&i 



REBATE OFFER 




Unit * or College Dept 




B 50 for a 6 or 10 month signed lease ■ *IOO for a I year signed lease 



PBCC , May era /Theatre Club 
meets every other Thursday at 
1 1 :45 a.m. in the DuncanTheatre/ 
west, entrance, Contact Mrs. Sunny 
Meyer at 437-8139 for more infor- 
mation. 

Inter Club Council (ICC) 

Meetings are held every Thursday at 
1:30 p.m. in the SAC LOUNGE, all 
students are invited to participate. 

Earl v Childhood Cluflb meets the 
third "Thursday of each month; 
January 13, February 10. March 
17, and April 14, from 12:15 to 
1:1.5 in SC 113. Contact. Sue 
Haines at 439-8046 or in SC 1 1 8. 

StodjejatsjTpjLiffltejM 
B^bOTfaffMMagLJBBa club meete 

every Wednesday at 3:00 p.m. in 
the cafeteria. Contact Danita Kurtz 
at 439-8233 for more information. 

The Computer Clmb/PFMA is 

interested in. new members, they 
meet, the third Saturday of each 
month at. 1.0 a.m. Contact Mary Kelly 
McWaters for location at 439-8306. 

meets every Wednesday at 1:30 
SS 103. Contact Mrs. Gwert 
Ferguson at 439-8327. 

colle ge Republican c lub ..holds 
meetings In SS203 at 7 p.m. Call 
686-0970 for more information. 

frtu dent Government A ssocia- 
tion (SGA) meets every Thurs- 
day at 2:30 p.m. in the Student. 
Activities Center (SAC), all 
students are encouraged to 
attend! 

Coll egiate Music Educators Na.~ 
tlonal Conference fCMENCl m eets 
every other Tuesday at 1:30 p.m. in 
Ito. 110 in Humanities Bldg.? For 
more into, call BobJones at 439-8142.. 

(S N A! is meeting March 15 at 
lITsO a.m. and March 17 at 
noon. Contact Easter Arora at 
439-8362. 

n^ta Omicron ch a pter of IPli, ft 
TJjiej a j to PPft meets every other 
Sunday in Continuing Education 
(CE 121) at 7pm. 
For more information contact. Mr. 
Hamlin In BA 110. 



rttatributive Education Chub 
of A merica fPEC Al meets Tues., 
Wed. and Sundays. Dates were 
unavailable at press time. 

For more information plea.se 
call Susun Thompson at 64 1 0345. 

Smith East Occupational 

every Monday ai 2:50 p.m. in 
AH317 (OT LAB). Contact Pat 
Barnes at 471-0628. 



S^udent„ge«ouice_ Courj,£il 
(SRC) meets every Thursday at $ 
p.m. in the cafeteria. CURRENTtZT 
NOT MEETING. 



TO DAVE YOUR 

MEETINGS I ISIT I> 

CALL 43!)-80G4< 

AND LEAVE 

MESSAGE W 
INEOUMATION 



March 29, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 5 



South Campus SGA attends Florida 
Junior College Student Government 
Association spring conference 

Elimination of the CLAST proposed 



By JOSEPH O. SABB M 
Staff Reporter/South Campus 

The Florida Junior College Stu- 
dent Government Association 
(FJCSGA) spring conference was 
held Feb. 24-26, in Orlando. Ap- 
proximately 400 students attended 
the conference, and they brought 
with them the views and ideas of 
their schools. All of PBCC's cam- 
puses were represented as were 
most other junior colleges in the 
state. Four hundred students 
came to the electoral conference to 
represent approximately one mil- 
lion junior college students. 

Even with the slim number 
of delegates attending, there was a 
lot of excitement, fun, debating, 
and electioneering going on. As 
the conference progressed, nine 
new leaders were elected to the 
ranks of student government to 
guide the state's participating stu- 
dents in conformity and knowl- 
edge. Of those members, there 
was one district coordinator elected 
for each of the five districts, and for 
the state, a president, vice-presi- 
dent, secretary and treasurer were 
elected to run the state-level stu- 
dent government. 

At the conference, as always, 
much debate on previous and up- 
coming issues took place. Some of 
the issues that were debated in- 
clude: 

1. A possible end, transi- 
tion, and/or exemption to the ex- 
isting CLAST test. Options include 
but are not limited to: 
a) Waiving the CLAST for two year 



degrees 

b) Exemptions for students who 
excel in all classes pertaining to a 
certain part of the test. 

c) Altering the test to include more 
subject matter, yet discreetly elimi- 
nating misleading questions. 

d) Eliminate the CLAST and 
strictly follow Grade Point Aver- 
ages (GPA) scores. 

2. A required set number 
of hours of community service in 
order to graduate from a Florida 
Community College. This issue 
failed in the legislative research 
committee meeting by one vote. 
The reason for this proposal is 
threefold: 

a ) To have something for each 
student to write on their transcript 
if they attended a Florida Junior 
College. 

b) To spend one million students 
manpower times 12 hours (the 
original number of hours voted on 
irt the research meeting that a stu- 
dent would need for a degree). 

c) To have similar measures in 
other states to improve quality of 
life. 

3. To place a voting student 
member on the board of trustees. 
This may be the single biggest ac- 
complishment of the current FJC- 
SGA staff (the newly elected staff 
will begin their duties in July). 
This will allow students a voice on 
the board. 

For more information on bill's 
before the legislature, phone the 
legislative inforfmation hotline at 
1-800-342-1827. 



SFOTC 

THE SOUTH EAST OCCUPATIONAL 

THERAPY CLUB WILL BE HAVING A 

POTLUCK PICNIC ON SATURDAY APRIL 

23 AT JOHN PRINCE PARK FOR MEMBERS, 

FAMILIES, AND ALL OTHERS 

INTERESTED IN THE OCCUPATIONAL 

THERAPY FIELD. FOR MORE 

INFORMATION CONTACT 

PAT BARNES AT 471-0628. 




! swear. . . . Photo b y Mike Mitseff 

Tyshon Williams, newly-appointed SGA secretary ^ is sworn in by 
SGA faculty adviser, Mitchell E. Kass. 



SGA/from page 4 

Services, Mr. Scott MacLachlan, Griffin said, "According to this document, 
I was falsely impeached by a legislative member of the SGA, which is the 
Senate," said Griffin. 

The SGA's Sergeant-At-Arms, Richard Dawkins, and Vice-President 
Jennifer Langston, confirmed Marion's allegations concerning Griffin. 
Marion said that, "everything on Ms. Griffin's letter of resignation is factual. 
Before the E-board meeting I asked the E-board to look at the letter and tell 
me if any of the information was false. They would have told me if anything 
was in error, but they said it was factual." 

Marion then explained what he meant by the allegation 'Minutes not 
ready,' in the letter of resignation presented to Griffin. "When a meeting 
begins I want those minutes typed up and photocopied. I don't want to have 
to postpone a meeting because my secretary doesn't have the minutes 
copied and ready. The new secretary (Tyshon Williams) tias the minutes 
typed up* copied, and ready to go days before a meeting. That's what Iwant, " 
said Marion. 

Dawkins added, "Debbie wanted to do things her way. SGA is like a 
business. You fire those that don't listen." Dawkins also brought up the 
subject about the poster. He said that Marion asked Griffin to use the 
Stencils because it made the posters look more professional, but she liked 
to use freehand instead. So Griffin argued with Marion about having to use 
the stencils even though he, as president of SGA, pleaded with her to use the 
stencil. "That's not right," he said "you don't question orders." 

; . jLang^ton responded to the allegation by Griffin of an tanconstiturianal 
impeaotopent. She said, "We do not have a Judicial Branch, but if we did 
then, yes, we wouldVe let them handle Debbie's impeachment, but because 
we don't have one then the Legislative Branch had to do it. In this case, we 
referred to Robert's Rule's o/Orderwhich implies that anything not covered 
in the constitution is ok. So, Ms. Griffin's impeachment was very constitu- 

tiooaT 

"We have nothing personal against Debbie,'' Marion said. "But we need 
to work together as a team, and there've always been problems with Debbie, 
especially at FJCSGA. Now, If people keep coming up to me and telling me 
that they have a problem with my secretary, is it the people that have the 
problem, orisitDebble? Ifeltitwouldbebetterforhertoresignsoshecould 
concentrate more on her classes because she always seemed to be busy with 
one class or another. Her impeachment was not personal and I hope she 
doesn't take it that way." 



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Page 6 



the BEACHCOMBER March 29, 1 994 



March 29, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 7 



SPQRTQ 

p^ $8 the Beachcomber JL m 




Photo, by Justin Knapfel 
A spring swing... 

Vlark Lemke takes a major-league cut at the ball, But will the Braves 

jrvive the major league cuts in personnel due to "excessive" salaries? 



Atlanta signs many new 'braves' 

Lineup changes 
% justin knapfel challenge Braves in 1994 

Sports Editor 

The Atlanta Braves' lineup will be much different this season, After 
releasing all-star outfielder Ron Gant, and the departure of key free 
agents such as Otis Nixon, Greg Olson, and Damon Berryhill, the Braves 
may face a few problems. 

Rookies such as Tony Tarasco, Ryan Klesko and Javier Lopez are 
question marks. Tarasco and Klesko must fill the hole left by the absenee 
of Gant. Hitting prospect Chipper Jones will also be missing from the 
Braves lineup due to knee surgery. ; 

Lopez will be trying to be the Braves new starting catcher after I he 
departure of Berryhill and Olson. The Braves signed veteran free agent 
catcher Charlie O'Brien, but O'Brien has missed much of spring training 
due to back problems. 

Another problem area may be the lead- off position in the Braves 
batting order. They still have Deion Sanders, but Sanders has yet to play 
a full season. With most of their speed in Boston with Nixon, who will lead 
off if Sanders does not play? Also, the bench has been hurt when Brian 
Hunter was traded to Pittsburgh, and Sid Bream went to Houston. 

Some other questions remain: can an aging Terry Pendleton stay 
healthy? And will Jeff Blauser will be able to repeat his performance of 
last season. The Braves will have to rely on their pitching, Fred McGrllT 
and David Justice to defeat their new division rivals, the National League 
Champion Philadelphia Phillies and the Montreal Expos. 



'BCC's men's and women's basketball teams fall at the state tournament 



By JUSTIN KNAPFEL 
Sports Editor 

The PBCC Panthers men's 
basketball team finished out their 
season with another incredible 
record — 26-5. The last two years 
the Panthers have lost only eight 
games! But, sadly, they were 
eliminated from the State Tour- 
nament in the first round by Polk 



mm ROOM & SOftRgK! 

i n exchange for assisting PBCC 
Centra! Campus student, Mike 
Mabney. Mike is a 
quadra}* legic, which means be 
has very limited use of his 
arms & legs. Mike is an 
independant guy with a lot of 
spirit who needs some he If? in 
the morning & at night* This 
is an ideal situation for a 
nursing student or physical 
therapy student who would 
like to augment their class- 
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and the heart, please contact 
Mike Mahoney at 689-0386 
after $ p.m. and leave a mes- 
sage. Or call his voice mail at 
I7f -2157, k message, or call 
MadFltx at 478-9900. 



Community College by eight 
points. 

We just didn't play a good 
game. Our effort was there, our 
guys played very hard,* Coach 
Scott Pospichal said, and added, 
"I've got a great deal of respect for 
how hard they worked." 

Pospichal said that he wasn't 
disappointed because he 
didn't expect the team to win 
26 games. 

"Because of their toughness, 
and their competitiveness. 



they were able to win a lot of 
basketball games," said 
Pospichal, "I was very pleased as 
a coach." 

Next season, players such as 
Alex Kuehl, Marquis Wright, and 
Fred Pollard will be returning. 
Pospichal expects all of his sopho- 
mores to sign scholarships at 
four -year colleges. "We'll make 
sure they have a scholarship," 
said Pospichal. 

The Lady Panthers fin- 
ished their year 25-7. After de- 



feating Valencia in the first round , 
and Brevard by more than 20 
points in the second round, they 
advanced to the third round of 
the State Tournament only to be 
defeated by Jacksonville. 

"I can't take anything away 
from my girls," said coach Sandra 
Booker, "They played tough and 
they did everything right." Like 
Coach Pospichal, Coach Booker 
is proud of her team's season. 

"They played real hard, and I 
had no problems with them." 



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Debra Williams; leader of the pack 

PBCC basketball program offers the 
opportunity to get an education 



ByMARLAKAY 
Stojf Reporter 

A player sure to catch your eye is Debra Williams number 42. Sure, 
being 6'4" has something to do with it, but this sophomore center from 
Pahokee, Florida not only has height, but she also has the speed and 
agility to keep up with the best. 

Williams was recruited by former basketball coach Sally Smith. She 
has been hero ever since, and credits her height as the major factor for 
choosing to play basketball. Williams intensity for the game on and off 
the court Is hard to miss. "] love pressure", says Debra, "my strength is 
probably a mixture of pressure and being on a competitive team." 

Williams coach, Sandra Booker, says that, "Debra's height is defi- 
nitely an advantage. Debra is also versatile, she plays good defense and 
offense." Williams main goal is to win. "Points don't matter as long as we 
win. 1 could have zero points and my teammates could have fifty — as long 
as we win. We're 8-0 in our conference and 18-5 in our district a.ncl I'm 
proud of that. We are going to state." 

Williams is a major contributor to her team. In the game against 
Miami/Dade Kendall', she scored .15 points, blocked three shots, grabbed 
15 rebounds, had two steals, and one assist. 

Williams is not only a very gifted athlete, but Is also intelligent and 
knows wha|. she wants. Williams major is office assistant technology 
because of her interest in computers. Enrolled fulltime, she plans to 
attend North Carolina State after graduation. This is a great, school", 
said Williams, "Dr. Eissey and the coaches are great supporters." Will- 
iams is a rising star and is definitely one to watch. 




Up, up and away, . . Photo by Rob Gerard 

Debra Williams dominates down low and up high. 






Blaze ready for the playoffs 

Rob Celotto, top goal scorer and team 
captain: he wants the Sunshine Cup 



The Blaze will start 
the playoffs at home 
on April 1. 




Photo by Justin Knapfel 



Til take that if you don't mind. . . 

Rob Celotto, right, grabs Jari Pasanen's (Daytona Sun Devils) stick. 



BY JUSTIN KNAPFEL 
Sports Editor. 

Rob Celotto, 26 years old, is the 
team captain for the West Palm 
Beach Blaze, and has been one of 
the top scorers in the Sunshine 
Hockey League for the past two sea- -————-------—-------—— —-— — — 

sons. Celotto now wants to skate 

laps around the auditorium holding the Sunshine Cup for the second 

straight season. 

Last year in 44 games, Celotto scored 38 goals and 37 assists for 75 
points. This season through 48 games he has totalled 30 goals and 45 
assists for 75 points. His good numbers may land him in Europe this 
summer to play in Germany. If he plays in Europe, he will start a six- 
month season in August. "After my season, my agent will start getting a 
hold of people," explained Celotto, who's waiting for a response from 
possibly two different teams in Germany. 

Celotto is trying to decide whether or not to play in the new Roller 
Hockey League that began last summer. "I was thinking about it," said 
Celotto. He may play with Blaze teammate Brent Fleetwood in Portland 
or Edmonton. Celotto has had some experience in other minor leagues. 
Last year, he played for about a month with Lousiville of the East Coast 
Hockey League. Earlier this year, he was in camp with the New Jersey 
Devils in Raleigh and Albany. 

Celotto is fairly confident about West Palm's chance in the play offs, 
and feels they have a tougher team this year. "If everybody comes 
together, we'll be alright. We got Todd (Bojcun) back in net, so that's big," 
said Celotto. Bojcun has a 18-0-3 record, a league-leading 2.47 goals 
against average, and a 92 save percentage. 

The Blaze will start the playoffs at home on April 1. It's likely their 
opponent will be Daytona since they've secured first place. The Blaze also 
added muscle to their line up by signing 240-pound Link Gaetz after he 
was released by the San Jose Sharks of the National Hockey League. 



THE FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION 

(FDOT) AND THE FLORIDA A&M UNIVERSITY SMALL 

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER INVITE 

CONSTRUCTION/HIGHWAY CONTRACTORS TO 

PARTICIPATE IN CLASSROOM TRAINING PROVIDED 

UNDER THE FDOT CONSTRUCTION 
MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT AND BOND pUARATEE 

PROGRAM. THIS TRAINING COULD PROVIDE YOU 

WITH THE OPPORTUNITY TO RECEIVE BONDING FOR 

FDOT CONTRACTS. COURSES OFFERED INCLUDE: 

CONTRACTS, SPECIFICATIONS & LAWS AND 

SCHEDULING FOR CONSTRUCTION (APRIL 18), 

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN CONSTRUCTION (MAY 10). 

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL PAUL McKAY OR 

LEONARD STOCKTON AT1 -800-226-3881 

OR 904-561-2393. CLASSES WILL BE HEtD LOCALLY AT 

PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE "LAKE WORTH 

CAMPUS FROM MARCH 30 THRU MAY 30,1 99£ FOR 

LOCAL INFORMATION: CALL JANE SONNENBERG IN 

CONTINUING EDUCATION AT 439-8161 



CENTRAL CAMPUS 

New Course/Fall 1994 Term 

INTRODUCTION TO 
BROADCAST JOURNALISM 

RTV2300C 190 6667 
Wednesday 7:00-9:45 p.m. 

For information call 439-8137 or 
see Mr. Parbhoo in AH320 



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Page 8 



the BEACHCOMBER March 29, 1994 



PNTER TAIN MEN T 

JL# the Beachcomber JH. 



6 Ace 9 comic Carrey unleashed in 6 Ventura^ 



By D.S.VLLERY 
Entertainment Editor 

I didn't want to see this film. 
One glimpse of the preview and I 
was quite ready to give "Ace Ven- 
tura" a pass, and writing it off as 
the story of a buffoon who looks 
for animals. The prospect of sit- 
ting through this movie was about 
as appealing to me as dental work 
without anesthetic. 

But over a two-week period 
something bizarre began to hap- 
pen. This would-be bomb began 
to receive favorable reviews. 
Then, in a move that completely 
blind- sided me, "Ace Ventura" 
rocketed to number-one status, 
and (as of this writing) has grossed 
over forty million dollars. 

The reason? Simple. I was 
wrong. Very, very wrong. 



After seeing this film, I 
was wiping tears of fitful mirth 
from the corners of my eyes. "Ace 
Ventura" is the funniest, most 
rousing comedy I have had the 
pleasure of experiencing since 
"Wayne's World". It is smart, 
clever, and, more than occasion- 
ally, sent the audience into fits of 
uproarious laughter. 

The reason is that Jim Carrey 
- he of "In Living Color" fame - not 
only stars in the film, but co- 
wrote it as well. Carrey is a comic 
genius from the seemingly im- 
possible body-twisting slapstick 
that only he can pull off to the 
clever parodies that spring up 
throughout the picture. 

Tfie plot is basic - Ace 
Ventura, the pet detective, is 
called in to investigate after some- 



one kidnaps the Miami Dolphins' 
mascot, Snowflake. The trail of 
the dolphin leads Ventura into 
one misadventure after another, 
including a love affair with co- 
star Courtney Cox, and endless 
confrontations with a female po- 
lice chief portrayed with finesse 
by Sean Young. 

This sounds routine, but 
in the film we begin to realize just 
how on top of things Ventura re- 
ally is. For example, when the 
Young character sarcastically re- 
marks that he need not worry, 
the police will find the porpoise, 
Ventura spins around and - with 
his maniacal grin intact - replies 
"Excellent. Except for one fact. 
Nobody is searching for a por- 
poise - they're looking for a bottle 



nosed dolphin!" He then give| 
them a five minute crash coursrf 
on the differences between a do!} 
phin and a porpoise. You begin ti| 
catch on to the fact that Ace isnV 
an idiot at all. Far from it. He'| 
actually very, very slick bu| 
chooses to act incredibly weM 
because it suits him. There's an 
element of depth created by thai 
revelation that adds something 
extra to this already likeable film} 



Combine this unique anc- 
enjoyable character with tlu- 
many hilarious parodies that art' 
strewn throughout the film (tM 
most noteworthy being an imexj 
pected satire of the famous "disf ■ 
covery" scene from "The Crying 
Game") and you have a compkt| 
winner. For non-stop laughter 
comedy fans need look no furthej 
than "Ace Ventura: Pet Detective! 
I myself will probably take thtl 
one in again. As Ace himself woul| 
say, "We-ell, aaaalllrightthen!! "I 



Vai Gardena - "River of Stone" (Mercury) 



By CHRIS HARRIS 
FAU Correspondent 

Named for a village in the North- 
ern Italian Alps, Val Gardena is an 
unusual collaboration between two 
artists - Christopher James and Jeff 
Leonard. On their debut release, 
"River of Stone, " the duo embark on 
an exploration of music's landscape 
by combining their jazz and classical 
backgrounds. 

Other than a musical Jaunt, Val 



Gardena also takes you on a spin- 
tualjourney. Although the first track 
on the CD, "Pensive," is much too 
upbeat when compared to the rest of 
the CD, the other songs explore 
unchartered areas of your mind with 
beautiful melodies and haunting 
sound effects. After listening to the 
CD, I was moved by its power and 
knew that I'd discover something 
new to enjoy each time I listened to it. 
As for the music, the title track is 



very peaceful with a catchy piano 
run repeating throughout the entire 
song. Other songs such as "High 
Noon," and "In Her Hands" comple- 
ment the work even further by creat- 
ing a tense atmosphere through wa- 
vering sounds. It's no wonder that 
Val Gardena's inspiration for this 
album came from such eclectic ex- 
perimentalists as Brian Eno and 
David Sylvian. 

The album starts off upbeat, then 
slowly descends into melancholy. 
Although there's nothing wrong with 
that, it's necessary to point that .ouf 
as many people might expect ^ari 



upliftingtribute. Also, unfortunately 
a couple of the songs are remiriiscert 
of other artists. "Dance of tht 
Seagulls" sounds very similar to a 
Paul Young song, and "Pensive' 
sounds like It belongs on a Kenny G 
album. Despite these pitfalls, Va! 
Gardena lias produced an. amazing 
piece of work which is much like i 
painting with a wonderful selectior 
of dark colors Ming in the scenery 
Although the picture is surroundec 
ijpestuous clouds, at the end of 
lei is a shining white ligjr 

JwflJ. redeem the listener, 

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March 29, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 9 




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Page 10 the BEACHCOMBER March 29, 1994 



March 29, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 11 



i ' 



FEATURE? 

_JflL the Beachcomber J^mJp 



Special Oljmpians' redefine (lie spirit of competition 



BY LOURA LAFAYETTE 
Stciff Reporter 

Pride. Respect. Honor. 

These are qualifications we 
might expect to find in the athletes 
who represent our country in com- 
petition. The United States of 
America: a worldwide symbol of 
pride, respect and honor. The re- 
ality of these qualifications is at 
question in light of the recent win- 
ter Olympic games in Lilleham- 
mer, Norway. At a time when the 
eyes of the world are focused on 
athletes from countries around the 
world, the U.S., once again, is in 
the limelight. But the symbols 
have changed. 

In the drive toward athletic 
excellence have we forgotten the 
spirit of competition? Are we now 
striving to 'win at all costs'? Are we 
now resorting to cheating, dirty 
play, and even criminal acts to 
achieve our highest goals to be 
number one? Must we receive 
millions of dollars to satisfy our 
egos? And what are the messages 
that we are sending to future gen- 
erations of athletes? Where are 
the rules, the ethics, the brother- 
hood that all were once a part of 
competition? 



In the drive toward athletic excellence have we 
forgotten the spirit of competition? Are we now 
striving to 'win at all costs'? 



Recently, I had the oppor- 
tunity to witness athletic competi- 
tion at its best, competition in the 
raw. Undaunted by the pressures 
of today's athletes, these athletes 
are satisfied just to compete. From 
the opening ceremony to the close, 
the spirit of competition, fair play, 
and sportsmanship filled the air 
with excited anticipation. From the 
torch bearer to the procession of 
athletes to the events of the games 
themselves, these Olympic games 
were special in every way. 

These games draw little 
media attention. They are not seen 
worldwide. These athletes are not 
millionaires, but the thrill of com- 
peting is payment enough. Yet, 
these Olympic games provide an 
invaluable lesson we all can learn 
from. It's what competition is all 
about, and the motto of these 
games says it all: "Let me win, but, 
if I cannot win, let me be brave in 
the attempt." 



Now Leasin g 

Panther Park Apartments 

for students or faculty 




CLASS IS ONLY 
3 MINUTES AWAY 



from 

Palm Beach Community College 
Central Campus 
Lake Worth 




UNDER NEW 
MANAGEMENT 
CALL 582-9100 



Pon" t forgetabout our 
stuck n t& faculty rebates. 
Gall the office for details! 



As we watched the athletes 
compete in the spring games of 
these Special Olympics, my chil- 
dren and I discovered that winning 
doesn't necessarily mean finish- 
ing in first place. We learned that 
winning is competing. Winning is 
trying. Winning is finishing. Win- 
ning is doing the best you can do 
and then cheering for your com- 
petitor. 

As the athletes took their 
respective places on the platform 
for the ribbon ceremony, we found 
that fourth place meant as much 
to an athlete as did first place to 
another. It meant they had tried, 
had done their best and were brave 
in the attempt. We also found in 
these athletes the qualities that we 
thought had been relegated to the 
past. The qualities that symbolize 
'and set apart the U.S.; in these 
athletes we found the qualities it 
takes to be a winner: Pride, Re- 
spect. Honor. 




Photo by Loura Lafayette 
I'm a winner! 

An unidentified Special Olympian 

revels in her participation. 

This was the first Special 
Olympics attended by myself and 
my children. The lessons we 
learned were well worth the hours 
that we volunteered. We left the 
games feeling refreshed, inspired 
and thankful. And with a renewed 
hope for the future of the American 
athlete — these special Olympians 
were very special indeed. 



PBGC Spring Jazz Festival 
is a swfugin 9 success 

Professor Sy Preweller showcases local 
By mods mttseff high school musicians and jazz bands 

Editor 

Ice melting into mud puddles, and pollen-laden bumble bees buzzing In 
and out of just-bloomed flowers: these are familiar signs of spring. In Ohio, 
maybe, but not here in sunny South Florida. We have other signals alexttiitf 
us to the departure of "winter." fe 

Military Trail becomes passable, as do other main tfiorougbtkrea; 
favorite restaurants seat you without reservations, windows close agaix«at 
the coming heat and humidity, while in Ohio they put up screens and open 
wide the windows to let in the pleasant, cool, summer breezes. But. Where 
is one sign of spring peculiar to Palm Beach Community College Central 
Campus. It's the annual Spring Jazz Festival headed up for the last. 1 5 years 
by professor Sy Pryweller. music teacher and conductor of the PBGC Urass 
Ensemble. 

Every year Pryweller invites local high school jazz band directors to 
showcase their talented students on-stage at the Duncan Theatre. Most of 
the directors oi these bands are former students of Pryweller. Community 
support is overwhelming and sealing is at a premium for the two nights and 
afternoon of jazz and big band music performed by these young musicians' 

On two consecutive evenings, March 16 and 17. eight high school and 
one middle school band delighted and surprised the capacity crowd at the 
Duncan Theatre for over two hours each night. On Wednesday March 16 
Lake Worth HS. directed by Michael Hyde; Atlantic HS. directed bv Lou (s St ' 
Laurent; PBC School of the Arts HS. directed by Wayne Miller: and Spanish 
River HS. directed by Doug Harris performed big band, jazz, and other 
popular styles and compositions. 

But the band from Jefferson Davis Middle School, headed by Paul 
Magersuppe. stole the show. The sound was vintage big band. full, upbeat 
and swingin . Every listener in the audience gasped with delight at the «Wht 
of the youngsters who played with such maturity. The trumpet section" 
deserves special mention here; all that could be" seen were the bcuVoT 
trumpets pointing up, but the sound was incredible: clear, confident and 
professional What a great job Paul Magersuppe has done with these younS 
future musicians. j "*•«.*& 

directed by Ernest. Brown; Jupiter HS. directed bv Mickcv Gimnrv aZi 
^jardHS, directed by Tim m^^^^^SJ^^'^ 

too name only some of the students wouldn't, be fair, but suffice if to sav 

SS^SmT x: ome vvith " sions of thelr >°" th «"**"■ *™K 

At the end of each nights performance, Sy Pryweller and hi«* PBCr T«^ 
Ensemble took the stage and sent chills t h^KS^ft Lheir tfi? 
professional b« band sound. If you missed thYs year's Festival nS^r 
calendar now for next year, vou warn, warn *« n.L .h„ „r.*t!\ "!_ ^?, Ur 



I 



Inteirational education offers 
summer coiege credit and exotic travel 

By MIKE GIAMATT 
Starff Reporter 

Well spring break has come and gone and summer is almost upon us. 
As we reported in the last, issue International Education is a great way to 
spend your summer, 
traveling to exotic locations and earning college credit in the process. 

Tours like die Summer Semester Abroad to Costa Rica, are a great 
way for a student to learn about a new culture and earn general PBCC 
credits all while visiting an exciting country and making new friends in 
the process, according to Gene Arant who will lead one of the tours this 
summer. 

England , Spain, Canada, Thailand and Costa Rica, the choice is 
yours. Hurry because deadlines are approaching and you won't want to 
miss out on these opportunities.Contact. the persons listed below to find 
out more information on what could be the academic trip of your life. 

PBCC SUMMER LANGUAGE EMERSION TOURS 1994 

SPANISH IMMERSION TOUR 3-6 credit hours July 1-30 

Four week Immersion tour where students travel to Salamanca, Spain . 
Students will stay with Spanish speaking families and attend The Colegio 
de Estudfos Hispanicos while learning and improving speaking skills in 
real life situations. 

FRENCH IMMERSION TOUR 3-6 credit; hours July 3 l-August 19 
Three week Immersion tour to Jonqulere Quebec, Canada, where 98% of 
the population speak French. Students stay with a french speaking 
family and attend Centre Linguistique. There they will attend a series of 
extensive language classes and take advantage of the recreational and 
cultural activities available both on campus and in the surrounding area. 
CALL: Professor Alyse Schonefeldt at (407) 625-2553 for information. 
INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL 3-9 credit hours July 4-29 

Cambridge University, England July 31 -Aug. 13 

This international program open to students from all over the world 
allows students to attend one of the worlds greatest universities. Twenty- 
six courses are offered in Humanities, Social Sciences and Communica- 
tions. 
Special Summer Schools at Cambridge, , 

• Shakespear Summer School July 3-23 

• English Literature Summer School July 24-Aug. 13 

• Art History Summer School July 3-23 

• History Summer School July 3-23 
For more Information contact: Latse Best (407) 625-2351, 
SUMMER IN COSTA RICA 4-7 credit hours June 26-July 23 
Students will travel to Costa Rica where they will attend Intercultura 
Costa Rica, a school specialising in conversational language. Besides 
Spanish SPN 1 120, students will be offered other general PBGC courses 
Including Introduction To Photography PGY 1 101C. Music Appreciation 
MUL 1010. Art Appreciation ART 1000, Introduction To Business GEB 
1011, and Earth Science PSC 1530. In addition, students will participate 
in eight different excursions during their four weeks in Costa Rica, Other 
activities such as classes in Latin dance, cooking and music, Latin 
American literature, politics and social issues will also be available. 
For more Information contact: Gene Arrant at (407) 439-8142 and John 
Townsend at (407) 430-8013 or Kichard Holcorab at (407)439-8143. 
HUMANITIES OVERSEAS STUDY TOUR: 

Thailand 3 credit hours May 9-19; An Introduction to the history and 
culture of Thailand, The rich ethnic diversity of it's people, religion, 
methods of commerce architecture and fine arts will be highlighted. 
Tours will include historical sites and cultural centers Of Bangkok, the 
Grand Palace and a visit to the Bridge on the River Kwai. 
For more information contact: Dr. Richard Holcomb (407) 439-8142 or 
Kathleen Asher at (407) 439-8137. 



SUBS 

MA^lMATED STEAKS 

A WORD 

ABOUT 

QUALITY 

qual * i ■ ty (kwol'i te) n. A level of excellence. 

Sometimes it seems that everyone sells the 
"highest quality food at the lowest price." But 
saying It doesn't make it so. 

Polks, today some real chemical wonders are 
marketed as quality food. Just as inattentive and 
unmotivated employees are marketed as bright 
and fresh personnel. 

But quality food and service do not come from 
advertising agencies. Remember you don't actually 
eat super slick advertising, picture perfect menus 
or elaborate buildings. And when the smoke clears, 
you get what you pay for. You hope! 

I, Jon Smith, am totally committed to providing the 
best quality food and service for my customers. 
And my subs have the biggest portions in the 
business. 

Look at our food, look at our stores, look at our 
employees and see our commitment. 

At Jon Smith Subs quality is our only deal. 

... or my name's not 



you 




P.5. Qual ■ i • ty : At Jon 5mith Subs 
can see it and you can eat it. 




Temporarily Yours 

'We Care About Your Work Producf 



Word Processing 
Laser Printing 
Resumes - Cover Letters 
Term Papers - Proposals 



BARBARA BRUNET 
Freelance Secretary 

1401 Richard Lane 

Lake Worth, Florida 3346C 

(407)588-3462 



IMRMTIOML SPRIG FESTIVAL 1994 



Presented by the 



STUDENTS FOR INTERNATIONAL UNDERSTANDING CLUB 

(PBCC Central Campus) 



International Food, Fashion and Entertainment 



APRIL 16 



PRICE • $8 (OR $6 WITH A STUDENT I.D.) 

GROUPS OF FOUR • $6 PER PERSON 

TIME • 6:30 P.M. 

VENUE • FOOD SERVED IN CAFETERIA 
ENTERTAINMENT & FASHION SHOW IN SAC LOUNGE 



in r m i Mfl ffl fT i ff i TTi iiii.iiii ii. i u i 



im«ium»iinjii mill n in iiiiin mm 



Page 12 



the BEACHCOMBER March 29, 1 994 




Sixtieth Anniversary pull-out in- 
cluded in this final issue of the Beach- 
comber; we'll be back fall term 1994! 

- See Insert 



ftorida Community Cotkge 
(Press Association 




m 



■EST DESIGN 

"HIRD PLACE/STATE OF FLORIDA 



Movin' up and out? Candidates for 
graduation are listed and informa- 
tion concerning Commencement 
Excercises inside. - See Pages 6&7 



-.';! > 



STRANGE 



mv^ii/jr in WW 




'And J submit to the Court, your honor, that you cannot j udge a book by its cover" 



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1 Fighting force 
5 Practice for a 

bout 
9 Lump of butter 

12 Additional 

13 Made gentle 

15 Crocheted 
border 

16 Ms Lanchester 

17 Playwright's 
device 

18 Funny Johnson 

19 Modern: pre*. 

20 Simon and 
Garfunkel song 

22 Pull out 

24 Vipers 

25 Edam or Gouda 
27 Satisfies 

29 Cures 

30 Sharpens 

31 Author's copies: 
abbr. 

34 Blunders 

35 Caesar or 
Waldorf 

36 Indian 

37 Route 

38 Poet T.S. — 

39 Walks through 
water 

40 Affirms 

41 Shiny fabrics 

42 Most distant 
point 

45 Flyer 

46 Clifton Webb 
part 

49 That man 

52 Hammer part 

53 Cream of the 
crop 

54 Comic Jay 

55 In case 

56 VII 

57 Time periods 

58 Comp. pt. 

59 Autos 

60 "— It 
Romantic?" 

DOWN 

1 Prayer response 

2 Function 

% -3 Her cow started 
:,-' N \ Chicago fire 



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©1994, Tribune Media Services 



4 Affirmative 

5 Eat too little 

6 Out-of-date 

7 Moslem prince 

8 Make over 

9 Analyze 
grammatically 

10 Thespian 

11 Adolescents 

14 Argued 

15 Alights 

20 Catholic service 

21 — of March 
23 Snaky fishes 

25 Munch 

26 Zeus' wife 

27 Single 
performances 

28 Med. subj. 

30 Narrow margin 

31 Dagwood's 
boss 

32 Observed 

33 Meeting: abbr. 

35 Shirt parts 

36 Roman 
statesman 



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48 Prima donna 

50 — instant 
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\ 



Volume 54 Number 1 6 PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE ♦ LAKE WORTH 



^w*^ 



April 26, 1994 



Students for Indentation 
Understanding. Club offer \<v 
a glimpse of world cultures 
represented at C# Campus 



SIU 'Spring Festival' serves ethnic (home cookin') foods and 
provides a unique glimpse of fashions from around the globe 



By MIKE GJAMATT 
Staff Reporter 

The room was full of excitement. Interna- 
tional music echoed off the walls draped with 
flags from many nations. 

As the show began, handsome men and 
beautiful women coast down the lighted run- 
way, twilling to the music and showing the 
guests international fashions from countries 
all over the globe. Was this Paris, New York, 
Milan or L.A.? Of course not, this was the 
International Spring Festival held, April 16, in 
the PBCC cafeteria buy the Students for Inter- 
national Understanding. 

SIU, a group of about 200 students from 
countries all over the world, is one of the most 
active organizations at PBCC. The students 
energy and enthusiasm were apparent by any- 
one who attended the event, and rumors have 



it that SIU organizes some of the best functions 
here at the college. 

SIU students not only entertained but edu- 
cated and informed gathered guests, students 
and family members. The night featured ar. 
international fashion show featuring authentic 
native costumes from over 36 countries and 
international dancers who performed native- 
cultural dances. 

If you were a person with an international 
palate, you were not to be disappointed. The 
evening also featured an international feast 
featuring fine cuisine from all over the world. 
Students prepared and served many dishes 
from such countries as Haiti, China, Poland, 
Pakistan, the Philippines and many other na - 

Please see/SIU 
page 3 




Photo by Mike Giamatt 
Courtship: Phillipine style... 

PBCC employee Raquel Lim (seated) keeps 
time on the Kumintang for Cherry Baquero 
(left) and Cathy Parker at SlU's Spring Festival. 



State Champs! Women's tennis team 
to compete in national tournament 




Photo by Justin Knapfel 
State Champs again...! 

Top row, L-R Athena Constantlnau, coach Hamid Faquir, 
Jennifer Logan, and Amanda Hoffman, Bottom row, L-R Aredt 
Constantinou, Clarissa Medeiros, Krlsta Bolte and Natali Sunara. 



?\&Ei *4***.VYJ A*** trs.Vs.j-M^ "I rt 



Mae Nielander, recent PBCC 
student, is named Florida 
College Student of the Year! 



By STACEY SKINNER 
Staff Reporter 

Former PBCC student, 
Mae Nielander, a 52 year- 
old mother of six and out- 
standing campus leader, was 
named the 1994 Florida 
College Student of the Year 
Friday at the seventh-an- 
nual press conference and 
awards reception at the 
Capitol in Tallahassee. 
Nielander is the first non- 
traditional-age student to win the 
award. 

"Working with others and enhanc- 
ing their potential is its own reward," 
says Nielander. 'The recognition I 
most value is when a student says, 'I 
couldn't have made it without you.'" 
From tutoring to volunteering in a 
soup kitchen to recruiting students 
for Phi Theta Kappa honor society, 
the 1994 award winner embraces ev- 
ery opportunity to encourage stu- 
dents to challenge themselves and 
others to become more effective lead- 
ers. 

For Nielander, returning to school 



Mae Nielander truly is an inspira- 
tionalexample that students of all 
ages can make a positive contri- 
bution at their colleges and in their 

communities. — W.H. (Butch) 
Oxendine, Jr., publisher of 'Florida 
Leader magazine. 

fir i I , .,„. 



on her 48th birthday, "opened up a whole 
new world that I had heard about but 
was not sure existed. To get knowledge 
spoon-fed to me day in and day out was 
such a marvel. I still feel the same thing 
today as four years ago — it's such an 
enriching experience." 

The prestigious statewide scholar- 
ship program recognizes students who 
demonstrate academic excellence, sup- 
port themselves through school, and 
show concern for and involvement in 



Please see\AWARD 
Daae 3 



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gnrmwrHMrtiuuiujAtWBarfwa 



Page 2 the BEACHCOMBER April 26, 1 994 



April 26, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 3 



FDITORL4T 

Jl, mrff f/?e Beachcomber JmLmoa 



Perceived snub 
is 'graphic 9 
reminder to 
design student 

left out of show 

"...so when news of the 
upcoming student art 
show came up, I said 
"OK." I am going to kick 
their butts. But what 
was I to know. I got mine 
kicked instead." 

I am a Graphic Design student 

at PBCC. As a matter of fact, I am 

graduating in a month or so and I 

thank God it's over. Throughout 

my graphic design "experience," I 

took many classes. Some of them 

vere boring and some others good, 

it the classes that interested me 

e most were the drawing and 

inting classes. 

I was very enthusiastic when it 

came to painting or drawing in fact 

I always wanted to be the best in 

the class. My point is this: there is 

a student art show going on in the 

Humanities department. There has 

been one for the past couple of 

years. During last year's show the 

art work was really good, as it's 

always been. I had an airbrush 

piece which was displayed. I didn't 

think much about it. I knew it was 



AL VALENCIA 



a good piece , but not "good enough" 
if you know what I mean. Let's just 
say I was happy to see it hanging 
on the wall. I said to myself, "next 
year I'll have something really 
good." So I kept taking art classes, 
and hoping to graduate soon. Last 
fall I finished. I was taking my last 
five classes and one of them was oil 
painting. Like I mentioned earlier, 
I was interested in these classes 
and always pushed myself to come 
up with good work, I really did. I 
wanted to paint something related 
to music, I wanted to come up with 
something that would express my 
feelings about music. 

I've always liked music, espe- 
cially Rock'n Roll. It's music with a 
great feeling and I mean it. To me it 
evolves into passion, that's it, I am 
passionate for music. But I also 
wanted to show good colors in the 
painting, I wanted to show good 
disposition with the paint, I also 
wanted to show something people 
would look at and say, "hey that 
thing's got some work on it." 

The worse thing that 
happenned is that I DID. I came up 
with my pride and joy. I named it 
"Claupadiage" (the title is another 
story that I'll tell you some other 
time). It was a really good painting, 
so when news of the upcoming 
student art show came up, I said 
"OK. " I am going to kick their butts . 
But what was I to know. I got mine 
kicked instead. My painting didn't 
even make the show. It was a sad 
feeling. Really sad. The worse thing 
is that there wasn't even a good 
explanation of why it didn't make 
it. Someone said, "You should've 



Editor/Layout. 
Sports Editor 
Entertainment Editor 
Photography Editor 
Advertising Manager 



the BEACHCOMBER 



_ i 993 _ 

Florida Community College Press Association 

Award Winners 

— George P. Reis — 
First place Best Arts Review & 

Second place In-depth Reporting. 
— Robert G. Gerard — 
Third place Sports Photo. 

— Beachcomber — 
Third place Design/Layout. 



K. 



Mike Mitseff 

JustlnKnapfel 

D.S. Ullety 

Robert Gerard 

Daniel Prusaman 



Contributing Reporters /Photographers 

Troy Crago, Stacey Skinner, Mike Giarnatt, Daniel M.Moon, 

Davki P. McDermoU, Loura Lafayette, Doug Shupe, 

Brian Feffley, Chris Harris and Joseph Saab III, 

Opinions expressed in the Beachcomber do not necessarily reflect 
the views of the Beachcomber or Palm Beach Community College. 
Letters to the Editor must he signed. 



Palm Beach Community College 
BEACHCOMBER 
4200 Congress Avenue 
Dr, Edward M. Eiasey ^^ Worth - PL 3346 1-4796 
President/Publisher (407) 439-8064 Fax (407) 439-82 10 





Ms. Vieki Seheurer 
Faculty Adviser 



given us more to choose from." 
Like if it was, as it appears to be, a 
show of quantity instead of qual- 
ity. The same someone told me Mr. 
Ruben Hale was the judge. Like if 
that meant a lot to me. I honestly 
don't even know the guy, or whether 
he is good enough to be judging my 
work — right?. 

Anyway I just want to thank 
the Humanities department teach- 
ers for their "support" and good 
"taste" for art. And for making me 
spend so much money in materi- 
als, paint, brushes and whatever 
else was needed, just so that right 
at the end someone would come 
up to me and say, "YOU SHOULD 
HAVE GIVEN US MORE TO 
CHOOSE FROM" "Claupadiage." 



LETTERS... 

Sir: . 

Someone showed me the ar- 
ticle by Donald Antonin who quo ted 
Farrakhan as saying that the Jews 
regard blacks cursed. Indeed, many 
Jews are black. The State of Israel 
is the only nation in the history of 
the world who brought blacks to 
another country for the sake of 
aiding them (instead of enslaving 
them, as other peoples have done). 

Does your Mr. Antonin have 
any reaction for the vicious things 
Farrakhan's man said about the 
Jews? 

Yours sincerely, 
Rabbi Samuel M. Silver 



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Phoio by Mike Glamatt 
Royal apparel... 

Maricor Grlo models formal attire 
worn In Thailand. 

SIU club provides 
students far from 
home a place to 
share common 

experiences 

SIU/ 

from front page 

lions. 

The Cultural Festival requires 
a great deal of preparation and 
hard work, but according to Danita 
Kurtz, faculty advisor to SIU, the 
students feel its worth the effort. 

"Every week SIU members meet, 
and emphasize one country and 
students from the featured coun- 
try give a talk and demonstration 
on the customs and cultures of 
their homeland. At the end of the 
year, we put it all together and the 
Spring Festival is the climax." says 
Kurlz. 

Suzan Samarah, a Jordanian 
citizen and member of SIU, was co- 
chair of the event along with Indira 
Sherman. Samarah now attends 
Florida Atlantic University, but still 
stays actively involved in SIU here 
at PBCC. Samarah says that the 
Spring Festival builds confidence 
in international students and 
makes them realize that they have 
the capability to do something re- 
ally special. 

"Students through SIU realize 
that even though they come from 
different backgrounds, they are all 
interrelated," explained Samarah. 

One of the benefits of the festi- 
val, according to Samarah, is that, 
it educates people about the many 
different cultures and helps the 




international students acclimate 
to attending school here in the 
United States. 

Professor Dan O'Connell, who 
teaches a Comparative Govern- 
ments class at the Central Cam- 
pus, was the Co-Master of Cer- 
emonies for the festival agrees. 

"It's important for the interna- 
tional students to get support from 
the faculty, families and other stu- 
dents at PBCC and for them to be 
able to demonstrate their pride in 
their culture and to share that 
with us," said O'Connell. 

O'Connell believes that inter- 
national students share a special 
motivation to get involved and rep- 
resent their countiy well and most 
of all he says, "it's a lot of fun!" 

If the purpose of Students For 
International Understanding is to 
promote friendship and under- 
standing among peoples from all 
nations and diverse cultural back- 
grounds, then the outcome of the 
Spring Festival was truly a suc- 
cess. By the end of the evening the 
only thing left to disagree on was 
who wore the best outfit and which 
countiy prepared the best food. 

Truly a message of under- 
standing and friendship that 
should be heard and shared by all 
no matter what country they call 
home. 



Nielander 
encourages and 
challenges 
students 

AWARD\ ~~ 

from front page 

social issues or problems. Says 
Clark Maxwell, Jr., executive di- 
rector of the State Board of Com- 
munity Colleges and a member 
of the national panel of educa- 
tional, business and media pro- 
fessionals, "It is very encourag- 
ing to know that we have such 
outstanding student leaders 
ready to address the challenges 
that lie ahead" 

"Mae Nielander truly is an 
inspirational example that stu- 
dents of all ages can make a 
positive contribution at their col- 
leges and in their communities," 
says W.H. (Butch) Oxendine, Jr., 
publisher of FforidaLeadermaga- 
zine. 

The 1994 winners share 
$30,000 in scholarships and 
prizes from First Union National 
Bank's of Florida, Winn-Dixie 




Outstanding... 

Mae Nielander, 1994 student of 
the year. 



Stores, Inc., Electronic Data Sys- 
tems, and other sponsors. Profiles 
and accomplishments of the 20 
student winners are featured in 
the Student of the Year issue of 
Florida Leader magazine. 








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Page 4 



the BEACHCOMBER April 26, 1994 




NEBS 



PBGPiotitii Campus 
^cadeiiucAMrd Winners 




Photo courtesy of PBCC College Relations and Marketing 



Academic Superiority... 

PBCC South Campus Academic Excellence award winners (back 
row) L-R, Sharon Herron, South Campus Assistant Professor/Counselor 
Wayne Debee, Esther Hulsegge and Cathy Petroski. Front row/L-R, 
Shanti Morris, Luisa Comuzzi, Marigene Wojtanek and Marta Breuer. 
Not shown, David Baker, Robert Coughlln and Paula Jaddaoul. 



Special to the Beachcomber 

On Wednesday, April 13 at the 
South Campus in Boca Raton. 
Parents, friends and students gath- 
ered to honor those who achieved 
academic excellence during the 
1993- 1994year. The following stu- 
dents received the Academic Ex- 
cellence Top Ten Awards: David 
Baker, Marta Breuer, Luisa 
Comuzzi, Robert Coughlin, Sharon 
Herron, Esther Hulsegge, Paula 
Jaddaoui, Shanti Morris, Cathy 



Petroski and Marigene Wojtanek, 
Students were also recognized 
in the following subject areas: Ac- 
counting, Gonzalo Urzua; 
Anatomy and Physiology, Joanne 
Thomas; Physics, Jamie Wittkopp; 
Chemistry, Susan NemecKenyon; 
Mathematics, Matthew Schllen; 
Language and Literature, Danielle 
Rossman; Economics, Douglas 
Lea; Political Science, Robert 
Volguardson; Speech Communi- 
cation, Kari Budyk, Heather 



Woods, Patti Moore and Becky 
Moore. 

Academic excellence awards 
were also presented in the follow- 
ing areas: Creative Writing, 
Danielle Rossman; Foreign Lan- 
guage/Spanish, Danielle 
Rossman; Foreign Language/ 
French, Natasha Olds; Behavioral 
Science, Shanti Morris; Art, Chris- 
tina Bruce. 

Additional awards included: 
Cooperative Education Award, 
Tara Ann D'Auria; Minority Aca- 
demic Achievement Award, 
Francldin Joseph; Veterans Aca- 
demic Achievement. Award, Ed- 
ward Johnson; and Alumni Schol- 
arship Award, Francklin Joseph. 
The James W. Tanner Golf Schol- 
arships- were presented to Casey 
Bewley, Edward Johnson, 
Marcelino Paygane and Julie 
Vincent, President's Scholar 
Award recipents were Thanh Cao 
and Sllnda. Sermprungsuk. 
Glynn-Stone Awards went to Lynn 
Chapman, Edward Johnson and 
Christina Bruce. 

The Drama Award winners 
were Briana Kish and Jay Mur- 
phy. Chess Club Awards went to 
Phil Starr and AI Fortunall. PBCC 
SoutJjjuCampus Student Govern- 
ment Award winners included 
Katty Garay, Christina Eassey, 
Danielle Rossman, Joe Sabb 
Carlos Labrador, Tom Simpson, 
Jose Gueits, Silvia Trapper, Jen- 
nifer Ferraro, Vaughn Murphy, 
Roberto Baptiste, Jennifer Bruzos, 
Laly Peralta, Jennifer Verdolin, 
Michelle Drayson and Lucianne 
ThcoduJe. 



Intramural Award winners in- 
lude Dexter Riggins, Nigel Dent, 
Orlando Brown, Jeremy Fedoruk, 
Teddy Etienne, Sinclair Sobers, 
Omar Bowra, Chris Greico, Brian 
Kearney and Edward Baldwin, 



PBCC Central 
Campus Student 
Government Presi- 
dent Ken Marion 
and PBCC President 
Edward M. Eissey, 
present a check for 
$700 to Cathy Flora, 
Director of Services 
for the Children's 
Place at Connor's 
Nursery. 

The money was 
raised hy the mem- 
bers of the SGA. 




mms 

Photo courtesy of PBCC College Relations and Marketing 




irciBBasaaa 




RGBATG OFFER 



Prospect. 



Referred By 



Unit * or College Dept. 



*50 fop a 6 op K) month signed lease •■ *KX> for a I year signed lease 




Central ClamiD lis Meetiries 



PBCC Players/Theatre Club : 

meets every other 'Thursday at 
11:45 a.m. in the Duncan Theatre/ 
west entrance. Contact Mi's. Sunny 
Meyer at 437-8139 for more infor- 
mation. 

Inter Club Council (ICCl 

Meetings are held every Thursday at 
1:30 p.m. in the SAC LOUNGE, all 
students are invited to participate. 

parly Childhood Club meets the 

third Thursday of each month; 
January 13, February 10, March 
17, and April 14, from 12:15 to 
1:15 in SC 113. Contact Sue 
Haines at 439-8046 or in SC 1 18. 

Students for Inte rnational 
UnderstandingtSBJ) club meets 
every Wednesday at 3:00 p.m. in 
the cafeteria. Contact Danita Kurte 
at 439-8233 for more Informatiori. 

The Computer Club/DPMA is 

interested In new members, they 
meet the third Saturday of each 
month at 10 a.m. Contact. Mary Kelly 
McWaters ibr location at 439-8306. 

B lack S tude nt Unio n ( B Stn 

meets every Wednesday at 1:30 
SS 103. Contact Mrs. Gwen 
Ferguson at 439-8327. 

College Republican Club holds 
meetings in SS203 at. 7 p.m. Call 
686-0970 for more informatiori. 

§tude nt Government Associa - 
tion fSGAJ meets every Thurs- 
day at 2;30 p.m. in the Student. 
Activities Center (SAC), all 
students are encouraged to 
attendl 

Collegiate Music Educators Na - 
tional Conference (CMENC1 meets 
every other Tuesday at 1:30 p.m. in 
Rm." 110 In Humanities Bldg.? For 
more info, call Bob Jones at. 439-8 142. 

Stude nt Nurses Associat i on 
(S NA) is meeting March 15 at 
11 ~30 a.m. and March 17 at 
noon. Contact Easter Arora at 
439-8362. 

Delta Om i cron chapter of Ph i 
SiS.t&J&9fiBi meets every other 
Sunday in Continuing Education 
(CE 121) at 7pm. 
For more information contact. Mr. 
Hamlin in BA 110. 



Distributive Education Club 
of America (DBCA) meets Tues., 
Wed. and Sundays. Dates were 
unavailable at press time. 

For more information please 
call Susan Thompson at 64 1 -0345. 

South East Occupational 
Therapy Club (SEOTl meets 
every Monday at 2:50 p.m. in 
AH317 (OT LAB). Contact Pat 
Barnes at 471-0628. 



Student Resource Counci l 

(SRC) meets every Thursday at 5 
p:.m. in the cafeteria. CURRENTLY 
NOT MEETING. 



TO HAVE YOIJll 

Mil ti\<;s IISTIh 

.;iMesS 



April 26, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 5 



PBCC Eissey Campus Phi 
Beta Lambda members win 
state and district awards 

By CINDI NEWMAN 
Staff Reporter 

The Palm Beach Community College Edward M. Eissey Campus' Phi 
Beta Lambda business club students recently won district and state 
awards. Rebecca Wallace and newly elected District V vice president 
Granville Thurston will represent the College at the national conference 
in Anaheim, California, scheduled for July. 

Wallace won first place in Phi Beta Lambda's Business Law statewide 
competition. Wallace graduated from King's Academy High School and 
went on to receive her AA degree from the University of Central Florida. 
She came to Eissey Campus to get her A.S. in Legal Assisting. 

"Everyone has always told me I should be a lawyer" says Wallace, "But 
I'm not sure I want to go to law school." Wallace will be graduating with 
her second degree after winter term 1995. She's taking this summer off 
to marry another PBCC student, Jason Brower. Wallace is looking for a 
job as a paralegal specializing in real estate closings or contract negotia- 
tion. 

One of her primary law professors, Dr. Barbara Scheffer, says "Becky 
has been a pleasure to teach because she is an extremely quick learner." 
Wallace represents the ideal student. She's taken number one in the 
state, continuing a trend by Eissey Campus students, who have com- 
peted at the national level for six years straight. 

District award recipients induded: first place/Business Decision 
Making, Max Ballard, Cari Hatfield and Lyle Cooper; second place/ 
Business Law, Adrianne Osweiller; fourth place/Computer Applications 
and fifth place/impromptu Speaking, Fred Samples. Second place/ 
information Management, second place/Professional Keyboarding and 
third place/Computer Concepts went to Eddie Walker. 




Photo courtesy of PBCC College Relations and Marketing 

Future business leaders... 

PBCC Eissey Campus Phi Beta Lamba Club — Back Row L-R, 
Adrianne Osweiler, District V Vice President, Granville Thurston, 
Vice President Dave Stilli, President Mike Jonczyk, Eddie Walker, 
Lyie R. Cooperand Adviser, Stanley Oblaczynski. Front Row L-R, 
Adviser Dr. Barbara Scheffer, Regional Business Law Award Winner 
Rebecca Wallace, Faculty Adviser Joan Holloway, Kimarie Roach 
and Cari Hatfield. 



State recognition awards were presented to the following students: 
first place/Business Law, Rebecca Wallace and fifth place/Information 
Management, Eddie Walker. 

PBCC Eissey Campus Senior Instructor of Business Joan Holloway 
serves as Phi Beta Lambda club adviser. 




The PBCC 'Pacesetters' and the 
'Over 40' Jazz Ensemble — swing 



Photo by Mike Mitseff 
Phantom of the Opera... 

The Pacesetters, L-R, Marti San Phllp, Jennifer Elsenhauer, Julio 
Galio and Laura Gallo, sing a. number from the "Phantom of 
the Opera," ' Masquerade,' 



By MIKE MITSEFF 
Editor 

Monday evening, April 1 1 , at 
8:00 p .m. , Sy Pryweller and Patricia 
Adams-Johnson brought to the 
stage of PBGC's Duncan Theatre a 
night cf Big Band music and ener- 
getic vocal stylings via the PBCC 
choral group, The Pacesetters. 

Pryweller's "Over 40" jazz en- 
semble opened the evening's enter- 
tainment with a saxophone-led 
redition of "Opus One," followed by 
a swingin' lovers plaint, "How High 
The Moon." The band consists of 
five saxophones, four trombones, 
four trumpets, drums, stand-up 
bass, piano and rythum guitar. 



They played for nearly an hour, 
thenThe Pacesetters took the stage. 

Adams-Johnson, who sang a 
few melodies with Pryweller's band , 
led her vocal group in a rendition of 
"Masquerade" from the famous 
stage musical, "Phantom of the 
Opera." They also sang Opus One, 
and a medley from "Secret Gar- 
den." 

Pryweller and Adams-Johnson 
stage anumber of events every year 
at the Duncan theatre, and the 
musicians and vocalists in the 
groups are well worth a night out. 
Watch for their next concerts and 
enjoy! 



Students find ways of relieving 
the pressure of finals week 



By STACEY SKINNER 
Staff Reporter 

Hey kids! What time is it? No, 
unfortunately "Howdy-Doody" is not 
the right answer. It's finals time 
again! That time of the year when 
all of your teachers synchronize 
their watches, so that research pa- 
pers and final exams are due and or 
held at the exact same time in all 
classes. It's time to start preparing 



for the test that will determine 
whether you pass or fail, the one test 
students opt not to cram for. So how 
do you relieve this pressure that 
seems to be building to an explo- 
sion? That's what I wanted to find 
out, so I asked a few students on 
campus what their technique was. 
Donna Perito, a dance therapy 
major, says that she relieves the 
pressure by exercise. "It really re- 



laxes you and helps you get fo- 
cused. It also gives you more en- 
ergy." Dawn Kuhn, a computer 
science (Business) major, says that, 
"I hang out and sometimes work on 
my hobby — cross-stitching. Lis- 
tening to music also helps. You 
know the bubbly, relaxing kind of 
music." the Beachcomber's own 
sport's reporter, Dave McDermott, a 
journalism major says, "I like to 
hang out and sometimes listen to 
music. That's the main thing, lis- 
tening to music." On a more relaxed 
note, Mike Matteo, a Business Ad- 
ministration/Accounting major 
says, "I just work with it." 

Now that it's finals time again, 



don't you ever wonder if the teach- 
ers feel the same kind of pressure 
you do? The answer is "Yes." I spoke 
with Mrs. Kathleen Asher, a public 
speaking instructor, and she had 
this to say: "There is a lot of stress, 
but I try to put myself in my stu- 
dents place. I realize that they are 
under so much more pressure that 
I have no right to be stressed out. I 
try to relieve 'finals week" stress by 
planning something to look forward 
too. Like my trip to Thailand for 
instance, I am definitely looking for- 
ward to that!" 

So it appears that we all have 
unique ways of keeping cool. Just 
remember, it's only for a week. 



ANSWERS 



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PBCC student athletes garner 
top academic awards at banquet 

Snecial to the Beachcomber ,.,,,.. 

PBCC honored top athletes for 1993/94 at the annual Athletic 
Banauet held April 18. The male scholar athlete award was presented 
to PBCC Baseball's Sean Snyder who has a 3.4 grade point average. 
Female scholar athlete, Athena Constantinou of the PBCC Women's 
Tennis team holds a 3.86 grade point average and will be featured in 
an upcoming issue of Junior College Magazine as a Distinguished 
ArnHemic All-American." 

The PBCC Men's Basketball Most Valuable Player award was 
presented to Tyshon Fisher, and the Women's Basketball Most Valu- 
able Player award went to Debra Williams. 




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Page 6 



the BEACHCOMBER April 26, 1994 




** Tania Uriza Koerber 



ACCOUNTING TECHNOLOGY 

**Kim J. Gaylord 
*** Deborah Jane Krebs 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

AND MANAGEMENT 

Patricia A. Cahail 

Veronica Chen 

Rosa Gonzalez Goggans 

* Susan B. Krupa 
Gregg Alan Mock 
Arelys Maria Perez 

* Jayne A. S. Puleo 
Christopher Dixon Schiess 
Jennifer Leigh St Clair 
Gregory A. Stauch 
Joseph Pasco Testa 
Angela Thomasson-Gould 

** Suzanne M. Wade 

Evelyn Bienenfeld Walbrum 



COMPUTER INFORMATION 
SYSTEMS ANALYSIS 

* Daniel B. Brisson 
***Tereza C. Freitas 
Richard Lendzian 
Peter J. Osterberger 



COMPUTER INTEGRATED 

MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY 

** Russell Gene Mobley 
Joseph M. Nuzzi 



CULINARY MANAGEMENT 

Michael Donovan Clark 
Brett Andrew Smith 



DENTAL HYGIENE 

** Joan Elizabeth Adams 
Tracy Lynn Anderson 

* Sandra Griffin Bennett 
Christine Biermann 
Debra A. Conner 
Connie Sue Cook 
Sonia DeSanti 

Isabel J. Gomez 
Jean Louise Gray 
Debra Lyn Harfield 
*** Kathleen Shea Hatch 

* Angela Kay Hope 

* Kimberly Marie Kern 
*** Andrea Krausz 

Amie Lee Leffel 
Wendy Elizabeth Lyons 
Michelle Marie Mendenhall 

* Catherina Marie Miceli 

* Deborah Kay Moore 
** Susan Mary Moore 

* Holley Moyes 
Tricia Ann Ouellette 

*** Susan JoAnn Erica Pawley 
** Regina Branning Rogers 

Lesii Michelle Schell 

Robin Jayne Schwartz 
***Magdaline J. Semasko 

Julie Dianne Shore 

Sheri Lynne Smith 

* Hillary Michelle Springer 

* Carrie Lynn Starr 

** Caroline Bell Van Hecke 
**Joy Diane Wells 
Dana Michele Zayas 



DIETETIC TECHNICIAN 

* Gina I. Ambrossi 

* Regina Marie Batchelor 

* Petrina Kay DiSalvo 
Jennifer Lynn Griffin 

*** Joyce Couture Guimond 
** Denise Louise Izzo 

Danica Mazzaferro 

Melissa Erin Meurer 

Lucy Thomas Moore 

Deborah Lee Newton-Redditt 

* Beth Schnell 

** Dara Louise Stayduhar 
** Mary Anne Treasure 
David Scott Weisberg 



DRAFTING AND DESIGN 
TECHNOLOGY 

Stephanie A. Jones 



ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING 
TECHNOLOGY 

* Patrick James McCauley 
*** Clinton Ward Miller 



EMERGENCY MEDICAL 
SERVICE MANAGEMENT 

* Eduard G. Herrmann, Jr. 



FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY 

Scott A. Fetterman 

GRAPHIC DESIGN TECHNOLOGY 

Michael James Gulino 
Richard Michael Marino 
Aymee Eugenia Vasquez 

HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT 

Rebecca Schwartz Baker 

William Berg Levine 

Robert L. Moore 

Joseph Francis Nowinski 

Ulla Priest 
* Leonard Patrick Sands 
** Linda Sieve rs 



HUMAN SERVICES 
TECHNOLOGY 

Phillip L. Belt 

Alice Dolinshek Brandenburg 

Steven Nelson Curl 

Margie Elizabeth Dunson 

Tipsword 

Theresa Wright Jones 

* Barbara Mary Monaghan 
Joseph 

Catherine S. Kouns 
Kimberly A. Leonard 
JoAnna Mary McHugh 
Beverlee Ann Miller " 

* Therese Marie Morgan. 
** Kathy O'Keefe Ross 

Blanche Davis Scaccia 
Bruce S. Wilkins 



INTERIOR DESIGN 

* Angeline Ciccarelli BlasJi 

* Katrina Marie Moore 

LEGAL ASSISTANT 

Richard G. Bernstein 
Faye Campagna-Maples 
Veronica DeLaGarza 
Patricia Creedon DeRamus 
Juliette Dimaggio Ghianda 
Jaana Birgitta Kaanto 
Lisa Marie Merctirio 

** Deborah Marie Moore 
Hazeltine Morris 
Jeannette Marie Shambo 

** Coleen Voider Workinger 

NURSING ■ 



Christina S. Adams 
Judith Althouse 
Barbara Diane Anderson 
Michael D. Anderson . 
Judy A. Arnold 
Shearon T. Arnott 
Gerri-Lyn Baggott 
Karen R. Barker 
Ronald Bell 
Debra Dayle Benko 
Kim L. Blvens 
Veronica P, Blair 
Melissa A. Blake 
Rita V. Blalock 
Ellen R. Brown 



Kathleen Madeline Carey 
Tammy K. dinger 

* Brenda L. Coleman 
Ana Conde-Jones 

* Kelly Marie Conner 
Margery Ann Conti 
Ellen Crealore 
Patricia A. Davis 

* Angela Deszell 
Kelly J. Dolan 
Kimberly L. Doran 
Tracey L. Duslnberre 

* James J. Emch 

* Deborah Erkkinen 
** Jane S. Fitzpatrick 

* Gina M. Forrest 
Erica Dawn Fortin 
Barry L. Goldman 
Winifred A. Greaney 
Michelle Gutchess 

** Carol A. Hassell 
Eric R. Hastings 

* Karen Patricia Healy 

* Rhonda E. Hemingway 

* Lisa M. Herrmann 

* Deborah E. W. Johnson 
Karen H. Johnson 
Tina C.Kebler 
Kimberly A. King 
Jerry T. Kropp 

* Patricia Loulis 
Wanda G. Love 

* Sharon D. MacDougall 
Yader G. Madriz 
Norma B, Maragh 
Pauley T. Marcelln 

* Susan R. Marks 
Heather McCreary 

* Yolanda I. McLean 
Larry Melin 

* Suzanne Menegay 

* Mavis J. Moreno 

** Susan Frances Nida 

** Heidi Hoverkamp O'Malley 

Joanne Odell 

James Pavleas 

Laurleann Perlongo 

Karl Petersen, Jr. 

Stephanie L. Poland 
** Patrick I-I. Pugsley 

Joann Marie Rawn 

Elizabeth Reid 

Ellen Sterling Reis 

* Edward Frederick Rex 
**LaraineM. Richmond 

* Sue Ann Slattery Riendeau 
** Susan. McAfee Riggs 

* Julie D. Robalewski 

* Joanne Scharr 
Linda Lou Scribner 
Mary Gail Smith 

* Stephanie C. Slandridge 
Rita Ann Stielow 
Sheila Strong 

Alicia Tatum 
Laurie J. Taylor 
Sherry D. Taylor 
Patricia 'Maggie' Tetrault 

* James S. Trunk 
Alicia A. Turnbull 
Cheryl VanVoorhees 
Javier A. Velazquez 
Linda Ventry 
Tevan M. Wagner 
Penny C. Watson-Craft. 
Catherine Carr WerLman 
Kimberly S. Williams 

"Robert: J. Williams 
Roger T. Winer 

* Melanie Karen Yanklowski 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 
ASSISTANT 



Ton! Lynne Sexton 
Richard Edward Sheridan 
Sharon Hope Agid 
Peter Andrew Albury 
Karen Lee Balch 
Brenda Gail Boatright 
Katherine Carter Bradley 
Florence Cathcart 
John Lester Childers 
Angel G. Cirruto 
Laurie Alice Collister 
Annemarie Costas 
Bonnie Bolton Crowetz 
Carolyn Ann Eaton 
Jill Anne Esc her 
Robert Neai Furedi 
Cindy L. Goodson 
Psmls* T,vnn Hansen 



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OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

Tammy Samantha Holcomb 
Michele Marie Hosea 
Kathiyn Lynn Kilberis 

* Charles R. Lambert 
Robin Lynn Lang 
Alison Ruth Lippen 
Connie Sue Manion 

* Shelley McHardy 
Maria Theresa Padoan 
Dana Joy Pitre 
August John Poropat 
Jill Kaczmarck Potter 
Suzanne Racicot Presley 
Paula Alexandra Rut a 
Linda Ann Salvato 

* Marlene Ellen Shind 

* Maria Elena Simmdin 
Susan Law South 
Angela Fay Sutton 

** Rita Ellen Wisser 



OFFICE SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY; 

Ruth Ann Cox 

ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE! 
TECHNOLOGY 

William Mullarkey 

RADIOGRAPHY TECHNOLOGY j 

Tracy K. Barnes 

RESPIRATORY THERAPIST 

Gloria Gigi Arcalas 
Andrea Marie ColiLte 
Ireneo Capinig Floresta 
"Thomas Francis Johnson 
Melvin Mateo [ 

ReaArm McCarthy I 

Deborah Ann Micheau ! 

*** James Austin Myers S 

Mark John Robinson 
Craig W. Skirvin 
Vivian Theresa Vergara i; 

* Carl Anthoney Williams j 



WATER AND WASTEWATER 
MANAGEMENT 

* Jeffrey Alan Scher 









Erin Lynne Adair 

Joy Elizabeth Addison 

Eshan Shaukat All 

Gloria L. Andrews 

peter s. Aragona 

Jose Arauz 

Marci Diana Ard 

.O'rontes Joseph Aviles 

Jacqueline M. Babincc 

Ricardo Barbuto 

Mark S. Batchek \ 

Christopher Brandon Bedv/t 

Tracy B. Belcher 

Bryan David Elliot Benlloiis 

Andreas John Bertolis 

Maty Margaret Biagioiti 

Turner Frost Billups 

April Dawn BiUner 



1933 



1993 



Palm Beach Community College 



By MIKE MTTSEFF 
Editor 

In 1936, Jesse Owens 
embarrased Adolph Hitler at the 
Berlin Olympics by winning four 
gold medals; in 1933, movie-goers 
packed theatres to watch King 
Kong, a giant gorilla, climb the 
Empire State Building with a terri- 
fied Faye Ray in his hairy grip. But 
in the sleepy south, right here in 
West Palm Beach, in 1933 another 
noteworthy event took place when 
the doors to an old two-story stone 
building swung open, and Palm 
Beach Junior College assumed its 
place in history as Florida's first 
public community college. 

The genesis of PBJC was the 
result of three local educators: 
Palm Beach County School Su- 
perintendent Joe A. Youngblood, 
Palm Beach High School Principal 
Howell L. Watkins and John I. Leo- 
nard, who became PBJC's first 
president. 

Operating under the PBC Board 
of Instruction, PBJC emphasized 
preparation for upper-division 
work in colleges and universities. 
Guided by President Leonard and 
Dean Howell Watkins, the college 
remained at its Gardenia Street 
location until 1948. 

In its first year of operation, the 
college enrolled 23 students. Three 
years later, three students com- 
prised PBJC's first graduating 
class. Over the next several years, 
enrollment slowly increased, and, 
by the end of the 1930s, nearly 100 
students were enrolled. 

A highlight for the fledgling 
college came in the 1942-43 aca- 
demic year with the accreditation 
by the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools. And in 1942, 
PBJC's chapter of the Florida As- 
sociation of Jun- 
ior and Commu- 
nity Colleges was I 
formed. 

By 1948, 
PBJC was forced 
to move to Morri- 
son Field, a 21- 
acre deactivated 
Army Air 
Base. Fortu 
nately, the 
college's new 
home had larger 
classrooms, dor- 
mitories, a spa- 
cious library and 
athletic facilities. 
New faculty mem- 
bers were added,,' 
including the 
legendary Wat- 
son B. Duncan III who taught En- 
glish, economics and political sci- 
ence. Vice president emeritus of 
student affairs Paul J. Glynn also 
came on board that year. And by 
the end of the forties, PBJC had 
achieved a record enrollment of 
350 students. 

In the 1950s, due to the Ko- 
rean conflict, Morrison Field, was 




PBGC's first building, circa 1933. 



Photo courtesy of PBCC College Relations and Marketing 



reactivated and PBJC moved to 
temporay quarters at the Lake Park 
Town Hall. Depite the turmoil, 
PBJC created a new evening divi- 
sion that offered adult education 
programs beginning in the 1952- 
53 academic year. 

Finally, in April 1956, ground 
was bro- ken for the college's first 
perma- y^ icnt home on a 114- 
ite in Lake Worth. 
The Florida Leg- 
islature, led by 
then state 
senator 



acre 







-y 



Russell 
Morrow, 
.id voted just 
, ...._ . y M'.rt $1 million 
I , i ~\-\~ : ;.-y I. 'Hidings. And in 
1958, **W John I. Leonard re- 
tired as president of PBJC, Ha- 
rold C. Manor, who had been in 
charge of the evening division, be- 
came the college's second presi- 



dent. In 1958, PBJC celebrated its 
25th anniversary, and for the first 
time in its history, enrollement sur- 
passed 1 ,000 students. But by the 
1960s, that figure was eclipsed by 
another 1,000 students, and more 
than 1 00 instructors presided over 
the curriculum. 

In 1961, the first blacks were 
integrated into PBJC's student 
population; four years later, 
Roosevelt Junior College, the local 
college for blacks, merged with 
PBJC. In 1968, advisory boards, 
which ruled over Florida's 
i community colleges since in- 
[ception, became boards of 
1 trustees. Appointed by the 
governor to serve without com- 
pensation, the trustees set 
policy and guided operations 
of community colleges. It was 
the end of the sixties when 
Manor began to envision mul- 
tiple campuses that would 
^serve each section of 
sprawling PB county. 
In the early seventies, at- 
tendance centers sprang up in 
Belle Glade, Palm Beach Gar- 
dens and Boca Raton. Selected 
courses for PBJC South were 
initially offered on the Florida 
Atlantic University campus in 
the spring of 1972. Two years 
later, an agreement between 
PBJC and FAU signaled the 
beginning of the South Center. 
Westward, at the remodeled Na- 
tional Guard Armory in Belle Glade, 
the Glades Center opened in 1972 
with 400 students. Four years 
later, college administrators offici- 
ated at the ground breaking for the 
new Glades Center, and its first 
clases opened winter term 1978. 
Tracing the college's North 



Campus is more complex. It began 
as a portable at Palm Beach Gar- 
dens in 1973, where eight evening 
division classes were held in rooms 
borrowed from PB Gardens High 
School. An office portable was ac- 
quired and moved to a. site on 45th 
street in 1976. The following year, 
day classes were held there, and 
evening classes were offered in 
various north county locations, 
enabling 1 ,200 students to attend. 
His vision of multiple campuses 
taking shape, Dr. Manor, who had 
guided the PBJC for the past 21 
years, retired. Edward M. Eissey, 
who had first served as a PBJC 
trustee and later, North Campus 
vice president, was named PBJC's 
president in 1978. 

In the 1980s, PBC voters ap- 
proved a tax levy which provided 
money for repairs and renovation 
at PBJC. More than 10,000 stu- 
dents attended all four campuses, 
and, in addition, campus construc- 
tion continued well into the eight- 
ies. 

On the Glades Campus, the 
Dolly Hand Cultural Arts Center 
opened in 1982. The 500-seat au- 
ditorium was named in honor of 
Glades resident and former trustee, 
Frances R. "Dolly" Hand. 

At the Central Campus, named 
for the legendary Distinguished 
Chair of Arts and Letters who 
served the college for 43 years, the 
Watson B. Duncan III Theatre, a 
720-seat performing arts teaching 
facility, opened in October 1986. 
The college also received the dona- 
tion of the Lannan Art Museum, 
renaming it the PBCC Museum of 

Please see/PBCC 
page 2 



Page 2 



the BEACHCOMBER — Sixtieth Anniversary Issue 



April 26, 1994 




Photo courtesy of Dr. Paul J. Glynn, Vice President of Student Affairs PBJC, now retired 

srcss&sr ^ Newe " (,ater Dr Newei,) ' Ra,ph ^ aater «^ £#£££ 

Paul J. Glynn, fonner Vice President of 

Student Affairs at PBJC, is still a student advocate 



ByTROYCRAGO 
Staff Reporter 

Looking back on the 60th an- 
niversary of PBCC, one might think 
there are very few ties with the 
early years left around. This 
couldn't be further from the truth 




Paul J. Glynn has been involved 
with PBCC for almost 50 years, 
and his benevolent influence has 
touched the lives of many stu- 
dents. 

Glynn's involvement with 
PBCC began in 1949 when he 



served as the Vice President of 
Student Affairs, when it was known 
as Palm Beach Junior College. He 
describes his duties as ranging 
from teaching science and psy- 
chology to coaching basketball and 
baseball to hammering boards 



...the Glynn-Stone 
Scholarship is available 
to returning students, 
regardless of need, and 
is based upon academic 
standing — nothing less 
than an A-minus GPA 
qualifies for this schol- 
arship. 

during hurricanes. Is there much 
of a difference between the stu- 
dents he taught and the 18,000 
students on campus today? Not 
really, says Glynn. Students over 
the decades are pretty much the 
same; some bright, some athletic, 
some just along for the ride. Glynn 
has seen students become suc- 
cessful actors, sports figures, doc- 
tors, lawyers, and so forth. 

But even at age 78, Glynn has 
remained active in the affairs of 
students at PBCC. Currently, 
Glynn is working to obtain schol- 
arships for students. With the 
$250,000 he has invested, schol- 
arships from the interest will be 
given to as many student on all 
four campuses as possible. Al- 
though his scholarships are under 
the auspices of the PBCC Founda- 
tion, Glynn does most of the leg- 
work. 

Three prominent scholarships 
are available because of Glynn's 
work. 'Dollars for Scholars' pro- 
vides money to students through a 
work-studyprogram. The Bill Moss 
Scholarship has close to $50,000 
available, and the Glynn-Stone 
Scholarship is available to return- 
ing students, regardless of need, 
and is based upon academic stand- 
ing — nothing less than an A- 
minus GPA qualifies for this schol- 
arship. 



"'' ™ " ' »« "' ^ ™g« «B«a«a«'™t^^ 



April 26, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER — Sixtieth Anniversary Issue 



Page 3 



L-R, film and TV ac- 
tor Burt (Buddy) 
Reynolds, the late 
Watson B. Duncan 
HI (PBGC's Duncan 
Theatre is named 
for him), and actor 
Monte Markham. 
BothMarkham and 
Reynolds were stu- 
dents at PBJC in the 
1950s. 




PBCC continues to strive for 
quality education into the nineties 



PBCC/ 

from front page 

Art. At the end of the decarip. pnrn c ^ 

campus, and after op^L w v l° Uth Was ° mci ^ designated as a 

permanent classroom^mSg ^IZ!^ "^ ^^ the ** 

In 1988 Palm Beach t y ° pened - 

Community College. r C ° Uege was renamed Pa l m Beach 

The 1990s nam a * vi 

our nation transfixed. 'then"™ ' ^m' 7^^ Perslan Gulf •»*> 
devasted South Florida. At PBCC »» '" 2 ' Hl «fcane Andrew 

Pacer was put out to pasture bvth^ ST-?*"** WaS tol ro<luMd. the 
colteges cotors were Lu^d i L S^ ""f 1 "' In addltl ™. ** 
enMronmentJ.andanewlotow^S . ^ Whlte ("Presenting the 
was renamed the Edward SSS T \" L "* North cLus 

nRrr ? "? ° riglnal b °™ °?S Sit"' "* PBC Sch °°' B °^ 
PBCC for $10. Plans are cuiroX? J ""dtagon Gardenia Street, to 

structure, and once renov a i^ y und e™oy to restore the hKtortn 

U sed as an educa^S^™*'^. ^undtag^agaSe 

3tude„, entoumen, approachS^oo S'^ Jubfa «* 



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Graduating class of 
Roosevelt Junior College. 
Recently deceased Britton G. 

Sayles was its president un- 
til its merger with then Palm 
Beach Junior College in 1965. 
Originally, KJC existed to 
forestall racial integration of 
PBJC, Mr. Sayles finished 
his career as north area Su- 
perintendent of Palm Beach 
County schools from 1973-79. 




Dr. Harold 
Manor shares his 
insight on issues 
that concern 
today's students 



By CHARLES MONACO 
Staff Reporter 

As the 6()lh Anniversary of Palm 
Beach Community College Is upon 
us we relied, hack with former PBJC 
President Harold C. Manor, who has 
definitely seen a lot happen over the 
years, since- serving 21 years as only 
the second president, of PBJC (the 
first was John I. Ujonard) from 1958 
until liis retirement in September of 
1978, and his enthusiasm hasn't been 
quelled for PBCC. 

"I'm greatly enjoying myself in 
retirement and still' volunteer help in 
the COBOL computer lab two days a 
week," said Dr. Manor. 

Under Manor, the college experi- 
enced outstanding growth In enroll- 
ment, staff, course offerings and ser- 
vices to I he community. While he 
concedes much of his and the schools 
accomplishments were demanded by 
a changing and diverse population, 
and to agreat extent, the community's 
business needs as well. 

"We took the challenges and 
worked well with the State" legisla- 
ture to progress as a vital community 
asset," Dr. Manor explained. He also 
specifically mentioned the arrival of 
RCA, Pratt & Whitney, and the needs ' 
of the senior citizens of the area. With 
the need for progressive forethought 
in a demanding academic area Dr. 
Manor said, "It will continue to be an 
exciting time for the school with rapid 
changes in the health-care fields, and 
ol course the technological fields." 

Of late there has been talk of 
"Political Correctness" on campus, 
and (he academic arena being used 
as a forum for political and social 
issues. The former president ex- 
Pressed some caution but also un- 
derstanding: "It is typical of all gen- 
erations to feel they're breaking 
ground on certain issues. We as edu- 
cators must watch the boundaries. 
B ut also understand and listen to 
young people's views." He added that 
high schools and parents need to 
carry more weight in young people's 
lives. And even suggested classes in 
Parenting at the high school level. 

Basically former president Manor 
See s a bright future for the students 
°' today and tommorow, but added, 
I'd like to see more young people 
take advantage of things offered in 
Junior High and High School, so as 
to have a more open-mind concern- 
ing fields of endeavor to pursue in 




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Page 4 



the BEACHCOMBER — Sixtieth Anniversary Issue 



April 26, 1994 



April 26, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 7 



A chat with Dr«Eclwaifcl 
E£ssey 9 president of PBCC 

President since 1978, Dr. Eissey is 
only the third to hold the office since 1933 



By CHRIS HARRIS 
FAU Correspondent 

Beachcomber (BC) : What has been PBCC's great- 
est achievement in its 60 years? 
Dr. Eissey (E): PBCC has multiple achieve- 
ments to be proud of: Number one, we've gone 
from seven students the first year we opened to 
over 50,000. Number two, we've gone from a 
very small building up on Gardenia Street in 
1933 to this great institution, which now has 
four campuses. We've gone from being just a 
transfer college to where we now have 70 de- 
greed programs that prepare students, not, 
necessarily, to go on to a university, but into 
nursing, dental hygiene, dental assistant etc. 
We have improved the aesthetics of the cam- 
puses by planting over 12,000 trees on this 
campus (Central) alone. We've added several 
hundred millions of dollars of new facilities, 
and become one of the nation's leading aca- 
demic institutions. 

BC: If you had to single out one teacher, whether 
he or she is alive or dead, who would it be and 
why? 

E: Well, here again, to name the best teacher is 
very, very difficult because we have, even today, 
literally a dozen outstanding master teachers 
on our campuses, but because of my personal 
association with Watson B. Duncan III, I would 
have to say that he was one of our top master 
teachers. I was a student in his very first class 
that he taught at Palm Beach Junior College 
located at the airbase on Morrison Field — now 
it's Palm Beach International Airport. 
BC: What will be PBCC be like as it enters the 



21st century? 

E: PBCC will be on the cutting edge of education 
in the entire state of Florida. We will be meeting 
the needs of 21st century business and indus- 
try. We're going to be In the forefront of the arts 
at Palm Beach Community College, and the 
' forefront of the academic arena, especially in 
the licensing and certificate programs. We will 
be dealing at that time, because we're 
embryonicaly doing so now, in the area of 
television, movies, theater, and not just acting 
or singing or dancing, but rather in areas such 
as camera technicians, set designers, costume 
designers, camera work, lighting technicians 
and sound technicians. The movie-TV industry 
is going to be one of the biggest industries in the 
entire state, and it's going to be primarily cen- 
tered in Palm Beach County. 
BC: Are there any plans for additional cam- 
puses? 

E: No, we don't have any plans for any addi- 
tional campuses. We do have tremendous growth 
on our campuses and we will be building addi- 
tional facilities to meet the needs of the stu- 
dents. As an example, we just finished a gym- 
nasium on the South Campus. We've also built 
what we call Classroom II, which is our largest 
classroom building, up on the Eissey campus. 
We will be building a new gymnasium also. In 
1 994 we will be beginning a very large, compre- 
hensive, vocational/ occupational, technical 
building on the Central Campus. So we will be 
trying to build the facilities now that we know 
we will need at the turn of the century. And 
computer technology is going to be like a foot- 



pedal sewing machine in comparison to what j| 
it's going to be then, and we want to be at the 
forefront of technology here at the college. 
BC: If you had to pick out an area that needs the 
biggest improvement at PBCC that hasn't been 
fully explored or hasn't reached its potential 
during the first 60 years, what would area 
would that be? 

E: In the area that we mentioned already, tech- 
nology. That would be in vocational, occupa- 
tional, and technical programs. That would be 
in programs in business-industry education. 
Those things have not met their full potential in. 
our first 60 years . I hope we'll never be at the top 
of the mountain in any program because then 
I think you're going to go down the other side of 
the mountain. We don't want to do that, but 1 
think we've pretty much met that in the aca- 
demic arena for the transfer programs, institu- 
tions of higher learning, the university system. 
I think our programs in mathematics, science, 
and in social science are all running beauti- 
fully, but these other out-reach programs we're 
going to be spending a lot of time on. 
BC: If you weren't the President of PBCC, whatf 



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* WITTi'HONOR 1 3 ■20-^49 GPA? 
WITH HIGH HONOR ^3:50^79 GPA 
ESIDErpiL HONOR r*3 v 80-4.0 GPA 
ve throu^telrrn ^ prior to graduation.: 



V 



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would you be doing instead? 
E: I would be teaching. I would probably be 
another ham like Watson B. Duncan was, and [ 
I thoroughly enjoyed the years that I was In the 
classroom. 

BC: What personal activities do you engage in 
outside of work? 

E: There are several things that I do outside of 
work. I am a very committed outdoorsman, 
claim to be the world's best snook fisherman, 
play a lot of tennis. I play golf. I'm an avid 
gardener. I love to garden. I grow a lot of what 
might be considered exotic things and I have a 
tremendous amount of enthusiasm for growing! 
things that feed you. I happen to be Lebanese:, 
and we have a saying, 'If it won't feed you, don'| 
plant it.' So I have everything from banana trees!' 
to grapefruit trees to fig trees. I have iraintf 
parsley, oregano, tangerines, and grapefriaitsf 
So I don't think many people would think of me \. 
as a gardener but I love to garden. | 

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** Cheryl Lee Walkover 
** Jason Jon Weihrich 

Kenneth Ray Weiland 
** Elizabeth Marie Weiss 

Kristina M. Weston 
** Laura Ann White 

Glenda Lafaye Williams 

Karen Williams 

TaraWulf 

Amir Munir Yordi 

Jennifer B. Yudell 

* Karla A. Yurick 
Arman Hussain Zaidi 
Jacqueline Joanne Zirk 



Coinieiceient 
Exercises to be held 
itieSoiiFkiia 
Fair Crouds 

OnThursday,May5, 1994 
at 3:00 p.m., for some, 
journey's end has come; 
for others, it's just begun. 



DIRECTIONS: 

1-95 to Southern Blvd.. turn west 
on Southern to the Fair Grounds, 
then turn north to the main park- 
ing area. Enter through the north 
end of the Main Expo Building. 
Line-ap: 

There will be no rehearsal. Line-up 
for graduation is at 2:00 p.m. 
Thursday, May 5, 1994. 
Processional: 

Faculty and Graduates in academic 
robes. 

Dress for Commencement Exer- 
cises: 

Men: White dress shirt, dark tie, 
dark shoes and dark trousers. 
Women: Dark shoes, dress with a 
neckline that does not show above 
the collar of the gown; hair style 
that will allow the cap to be worn 
level; no personal items are to be 
carried into the ceremony; no cor- 
sages, signs, decorations, etc. are 
to be worn on your cap and /or 
gown. 

1. Graduates must be in the Line- 
up Building by 2:00 p.m. 

2. Caps: Women keep caps on 
throughout Ceremony. Men re- 
move caps for invocation, replace 
after prayer; remove for benedic- 
tion, replace after. All tassels worn 
on left side. 

3. Each candidate who attends 
commencement will be photo- 
graphed as the diploma is pre- 
sented. Graduates will receive a 
proof in the mail within two weeks 
along with information concern- 
ing photo packages and prices. 

4. Since grades are not available 
prior to commencement, some stu- 
dents going through Commence- 
ment Exercises may not meet 
graduation requirements. Notifi- 
cation will be in time to make up 
for deficiencies next term. 



IIKBiUMMWira 



Page 8 



the BEACHCOMBER April 26, 1994 



* 



ENTERTAINMENT 

Jf -^1 the Beachcomber JwL 



You call this music?! 

By CHRIS HARRIS 
FAU Correspondent 
Swell - "41" - (American) 

In a bleak neighborhood in San Francisco, alternative band bwell 
'holed 1 up on a second floor building to record an alburn named after the 
number on the door, "4 1 ." The result is a number of dreary, brooding and 
downbeat songs that reflect their surrounding environment. Depressing 
acoustic guitars and lackluster lyrics permeate the CD, but when the 
electric guitars are plugged in, the music takes on a new life. "Kinda 
Stoned" sparkles thanks to a stomping drum beat mixed with a groovy 
guitar riff, but "Song Seven" is the only other highlight, unfortunately. 
With a sound that sometimes sounds like an unplugged recording- on 
downers, Swell has given us a dark and unimaginative work that will only 
satisfy few music fans. 
Rating: C- 



April 26, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 9 




SWELL — L-R: David Freel, Monte Valller, and Sean Kirkpatrlck 



Rating the Theaters — A guide to 
the best and worst local Cinemas 



By D.S.VLLERY 
Entertainment Editor 

Summer is almost upon us; 
and, it is historically the season of 
big box-office as thousands of stu- 
dents flock to local theaters to catch 
the action-packed summer re; 
leases. But where does one go for a 
top-notch movie-going experience? 
Which theaters are the best, and 
what establishments the worst? 

A review of the most frequently 
attended local theaters, explain- 
ing which are worth your time, and 
which should be condemned, fol- 
lows: may it guide you throughout 
the summer. 

LAKE WORTH 8: Located on 
Lake Worth Rd. — I like this place. 
Not only is the staff courteous, but 
the temperature is always com- 
fortable, the theaters are clean, 
and the building is designed in 
such a way that when you walk 
into the lobby, it's as if you've 
stepped back into an original movie 
house. There's a certain magic 



about going to the movies, and this 
place captures it. Also, their selec- 
tions are usually top-notch. 
GRADE: A+ 

RIVER BRIDGE: Located in 
River Bridge Plaza, corner of Jog 
Rd. & Forest Hill — This is a text- 
book example of how not to run a 
theater. The staff is snobbish, rude 
and disorganized. The projectors 
are constantly out. of focus, and 
the theaters are ei ther freezing cold 
or warm enough to elicit perspira- 
tion. And the place is filthy. There's 
always a to t of garbage on the floors 
when you sit down. Recently, this 
miserable excuse for a cinema en- 
acted the most outrageous sin 
against the devoted fumgoer when 
they posted this sign on their ticket 
booth window: "Due to the nature 
of black and white film, Schindler's 
List may go out of focus from time 
to time." Bull! I saw a re-release of 
"Casablanca" a while back. That 
film is black and white and it is 
several decades older than "List," 



and it never once went out of fo- 
cus. River Bridge — in their uaual 
lazy, unmotivated style — simply 
copped-out. Do yourself a favor 
folks, and avoid this place like the 
plague. GRADEiF 

MALL CINEMA: Located in The 
Palm Beach Mall — Too small, the 
floors are always sticky (1 mean 
really sticky), and the movies be? 
ing played aire often dull and of 
little interest. Skip it, it's a cin- 
ematic dinosaur, GRADErD- 

AMC CROSS COUNTY: Lo- 
cated in the Cross County Mall, 
corner of Military Trail and 
Okeechobee —- Once, headed for 
disaster, this theater pulled them- 
selves together, and made a change 
for the better in the past year or 
two. The selection of films is get- 
ting better, the building itself looks 
nicer after they redecorated last 
summer, and the staff is capable 
and friendly. I grew up attending 
movies here, and it's good to see 
that, they can still hold their own. 
GRADE:A 

OKEE SQUARE: Located in 
Okee Square plaza, on Okeechobee 
Boulevard — The same company 
that owns the River Bridge — UA 
Theaters — shows here that they 



can do it right. Not only is tills a 
big theater, but it is clean, ail the 
films run on time with no delays 
and no projection errors, and the 
staff is likeable and do their jobs 
well. Easily one of the areas beat 
theaters, and a welcome change 
from the horrid River Bridge 
GRADER 

Finally^ I would also like to 
take; the time to recommend two 
smaller theaters, places that show 
movies in their second, final the- 
ater run. One is, of course. The 
Cinema and Cafe located on Con- 
gress Ave. — sure the food is ex- 
pensive, but the movies are great 
and the atmosphere is a lot of fun. 
A really gjreat time for everyone. 

The other is the Value Cinema 
— located off of Lantana Rd. and 
Congress Ave. The prices are ex- 
traordinary, the theaters arc clean, 
and the movies are generally ex- 
cellent. The staff needs to work on 
their social skills though. 

And that's the review of our!! 
local cinema's. May it be of use to; 
those of you who plan on checking 
out the screen scene during these 
next few months. See you at the 
movies II 




_ 



„.. n ,ilik>nininn» Administration denartment at 4^Q-8 1 04 



Gotta "knows" for news? 



the Beachcomber has openings for reporters, 
editors, ad composition, cartoonists, photog- 
raphers Etcetera...! 



Also, 




...a trainee for editor in chief is 

* . 

needed to possibly take charge 
of paper for Winter Term '94. 



3L2ES 



r J-c&ss*. s&, 4&«e&£eiL:K' > <£& 



-vira.l.l.&3a3.s;xa.^9Siss ■&«» 



JL* ■€>«€» ycanou 



call — 439-8064 for details!! 



FEATURE C 

-JnL. the Beachcomber JL^Jr 



Are American students 
geographically illiterate? 



Illinois or South Africa, 45% couldn't 
find Japan 25% couldn't find the 
Pacific Ocean or the Soviet Union 
1 5% couldn't find the United States. 
The overwhelming urgency of 
this problem became apparent to 
Florida's educators, the emphasis 



By GENE FELDMAN 
Staff Reporter 

American students are show- 
ing more and more that they are 
inadequately educated for their role 
in a high-tech., 21st Century ■soci- 
ety. 

Over the past few decades it 
has become apparent that Ameri- 
can students have been rated be- 
low students from other countries 
on knowledge of Science, Math, 
and also in Geography. 

Though Geography was a basic 
requirement in primaiy and sec- 
ondary education in America, it 
was subsituted heavily for Social 
Studies in the 1970's ; was seen as 
an adequuate substitute by Public 
educators at the time. Social Stud- 
ies which does cover some Geogra- 
phy, but mainly emphasizes hu- 
manity and relations among differ- 
ent cultures. Geography not only 
deals with knowing cities and coun- 
tries, but how the environment has 
shaped civilization. 

The deficiency in geographic 
knowledge did not really come to 
national attention until a class 
survey was done in 1983, given by 
David Helgren a Geography Profes- 
sor at the University of Miami. Some 
interesting statistics came out of 
his survey of 128 students on the 
first day of their Geography class, 



Helgren came to the conclusion from his findings 
that students entering college were almost totally 
ignorant of geography because of insufficient teaching 
at public schools. 



some of the results of the survey 
were... 42% couldn't find Lon- 
don on a map 55% couldn't find 
Chicago 41% couldn't find Los 
Angeles 8% couldn't find Miami 
7% couldn't locate the Atlantic 
Ocean. 

Helgren came to the conclu- 
sion from his findings that stu- 
dents entering college were al- 
most totally ignorant of geogra- 
phy because of insufficient teach- 
ing at public schools. Other in- 
vestigations into the subject came 
to similar conclusions of Geo- 
graphic illiteracy. The National 
Geographic Society surveyed 
10,820 people in 9 countries in 
1988 on geographic knowledge, 
primarily because of Helgrene's 
findings 5 years prior. The United 
States came in sixth place ahead 
of Italy and Mexico; with Sweden 
in first place. Of the Americans 
surveyed... 75% couldn't find the 
Persian Gulf 50% couldn't find 



has now gone from Social Studies 
back to Geography. Some private 
groups such as the National Geo- 
graphic Society have been trying to 
call the general public's attention 
toward Geography by hosting a 
yearly National Geography Bee, 
which gives winners, college schol- 
arships of up to $25,000. 

A college graduate who majores 
in Geography has not only teaching 
as anoption for employment; but 
can look also to careers in tourism 
and with the government in areas of 
city and regional planning, National 
Weather Service, Defense Depart- 
ment, etc. With the increase in use 
of new technologies, especially the 
use of satellites which are used to 
gain information on weather pat- 
terns, environmental damage to 
rainforests, to enemy troop move- 
ments as seen in the Gulf War. Ge- 
ographers will needed to interprete 
the vast quanity of information that 
is and will be available in the fu- 



The Epilepsy Association 
of the Palm Beaches 

First Aid/Educational Information 



The three RV of seizure: Rtonition; Response and Referral 



To b$ held on the Business Administration (BA) patio 
Wednesday, April 27, from 2 p.m - 3 p.m. 

All faculty, staff and 
students are encouraged to attend 



TUTORING 



IN YOUR HOME 




SincalW 



• SAT, GED etc. Prep 

• College Advising 

• Ed. Counseling 

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Palm Beach 
(407) 694 0600 



Boca Raton 
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ture. 

Test your knowledge of Geog- 
raphy Quiz 

1 . What is the longest river in the 
world? 

2. What major mountain chain is 
found in South America? 

3. What 2 countries are found on 
the island of Hispaniola? 

4. Ceylon is the former name of 
which country? 

5. The Crimea peninsula is part of 
which country? 

Answers on page 11. 



^^■■'M'MllliTO^ 

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IIAUII-MRll) 'Mm N Slit II V IIISKV. 1 1 

^lllllll^TOIlEIII^CKIII'KVKU 

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lAIMtSK VIII III ILM 

to f*iuiM*i:iTivi-: 



Ani.x/iM: iMiniM 1 1 iu\ t.n \imiu im:sh.\. 

i'u,i:nviiiiiH!iii!rnM,/i,iiui\!,sKii.is! 

CALL tHH-KtlUI A\tt * 

mvfi i wi;smm; — m\i 



.'.'FREE ROOM * BOARD!! 

in exchange for assist! ng P8CC 
Central Campus student, Mike 
Mahoney. Mike is a 
quadraplegic, which means he 
has very limited use of his 
arms & legs. Mike is an 
independant guy v/lth a lot of 
spirit who needs some help in 
the morning & at night. This 
is an ideal situation for a 
nursing student or physical 
therapy student who would 
like to augment their class- 
room study with practical, 
hands-on experience -- and 
you would be helping to free 
someone from institutional 
"living." If you have the time, 
and the heart, please contact 
Mike Mahoney at 689-0336 
after 5 p.m. and leave a mes- 
sage. Or call his voice mail at 
371-2157, Iv. message, or call 
MedPlex at 478-9900. 



* 



Page 10 



the BEACHCOMBER April 26, 1 994 



QPORTQ 

1 ^ JP ffre Beachcomber L W 



April 26, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 1 1 



Women's Tennis: next stop, Dallas, Texas and the 
national tournament 



The Lady Panthers win their 
conference by trashing their opponents 9 zip! 



By AREDI CONSTANTINOU 
Staff Reporter 

PBCC's tennis team is enjoying a successful season as they look 
forward to going to Dallas on May 15 to compete in. the national 
tournament. The Lady Panthers won their conference last month by 
beating all of their opponents 9-0. Coach Hamid Faquir praised them as 
the only team he has ever coached to win their conference without losing 
a single match. PBCC went one step beLter by winning the state 
tournament in almost the same manner. They accumulated 26 out of the 
possible 27 points by winning eight out of the nine titles. 

Natali Sunara won the number one singles title, Jennifer Logan won 
the number two singles title, Clarissa Medeiros won the number three 
singles title, Athena Constantinou won the number four singles title, and 
her sister Aredi won. the fifth singles title. Amanda Hoffman played in the 
number six singles and after a long three set battle in the finals, she had 
to settle for runner-up, 

Logan and Medeiros won the number one doubles title, while Sunara 
and Athena won the number two doubles and Aredi and Krista Boltz won 
the number three doubles title. 

On Monday April 8, PBCC held its annual athletes banquet where the 
Learn was praised for further accomplishments. Logan was voted the 
teams most valuable player for her win in the tournament. Athena 
received the Scholar -Athlete of the year award with an impressive 3.86 
GPA. She has also been nominated distinguished All-American Scholar- 
Athlete, which will appear in the upcoming issue of the JUCO Review. 

The celebrations are over and it is back to work for the team. They are 
practicing very hard to bring home the national title. 




Photo by Justin Knapfel 

i got -it; ; ,;t '■-'■■: ;.:-^;'^S ;: :-^^ ' 

L-R, Natqli ' Sunarq : ;dne^i||!m^ 

Community ■ Coll^g@|^^kS^||^^^|^^^lgi; ■■-;'■'■' 



■ Coach '/ilBEsiJlilpi^^^^^^^^^^^m as the 

oiUy'-teaiw.^|fellK|^^§fi^^||^':fb' win their 
conference''.witfi^^ 



Now Leasin g 

Panther Park Apartments 

for students or faculty 







from 

Palm Beach Community College 
Central Campus 
Lake Worth 




UNDER NEW 
MANAGEMENT 
CALL 582-9100 



Don't forget about our 
student & faculty rebates. 
Call the office for details! 



SUBS 

MARINATID STIAKS 



STUFF 
ABOUT US 

(OR HOW WE DO YOU) 

• We set our standards of quality, food prepara- 
tion, and cleanliness MOT on fast food chains, 
but on gourmet rated full-service restaurants. 
You are welcome to see our Kitchen and our 
products any time. 

• We hate lines, so we take your order as soon 
as you come in and call you When it's ready. In 
the meantime, you can mahe your drink, grab 
some chips, have a seat or read these things. 

• Our menu selections are limited to ensure 
freshness, quality control and the individual 
attention each item requires. 

• We ask you a few extra questions because we 
encourage you to have your custom sub the 
exact way you want it. Please give us the 
opportunity to provide you with our service. 

•■ We hardly ever run price promotions — your 
money goes into the steak — MOT the sizzle. 

• We cut no corners to make the absolute^best 
sub possible. We are even better than you 
think we are. And we love it . . . 

. . or my name's not 






Low and outside... 

Jason Crossey shows bunt. 



Photo by Justin Knapfel 



Panthers in Playoffs! 

By JUSTIN KNAPFEL 
Sports Editor 

Palm Beach Community College had to rally (o make the playoffs. After a crushing 15- 
4 defeat at the hands of Miami/Dade Kendall, the Panthers, rallied at home, came back 
and defeated Miami 6-5. 

In the bottom of the eighth inning with Jady Hill on base, catcher Tony Morales 
singled. After Morales' single, Tony Precanico walked. Kevin Moran stepped up to the plate 
to drive in Hill. Morales then scored the tying run on a sacrifice fly from Carlos Rodriguez. 
The winning run was scored by Precanico on Juan Veras" single. 

By the seventh inning, the Panthers were down 3-0. After tying the game at three, 
Miami scored another two runs in the eighth, but PBCC wouldn't give up in their 
tremendous come back. The win made the Panthers 3- 1 against the conference champi- 
ons this season. Miami/Dade Kendall clinched the conference title with a 16-8 record, 
which automatically sends them to the state tournament in Kissimmee. PBCC (13-11) has 
to win the playoffs between the second, third, and fourth place teams to quality for a spot 
in the state tournament. The other teams that are in contention are Indian River, Miami/ 
Dade Wolfson, and Edison. 



World Cup Soccer to begin soon in 
Orlando, where the Ft. Lauderdale 
Strikers will play exhibition 
matches with the best in the world 



By CHRIS HARRIS 
FAU Correspondent 

The days when the Fort Lauder- 
dale Strikers played before capacity 
crowds could be returning because a 
tidal wave of World Cup hysteria will 
sweep the United States this sum- 
mer, Although there won't be a true 
professional league until next sum- 
mer, at the earliest; the Strikers have 
an exciting schedule of upcoming 
exhibition games before they begin 
play in the semi-professional Ameri- 
can Professional Soccer League (APSL) 
which starts in July. The highlight of 
their schedule will be a game against 
Holland in Orlando on June 15. They 
play against the Dutch five days be- 
fore superstars such as Ruud Gullit, 
Frank Rijkaard and Ronald Koeman 
begin their campaign to try to capture 
the trophy they nearly won in 1978. 

Other Striker exhibition games 
include a game against the Haitian 
Internationals on May 1, Botev from 
Bulgaria on May 14, the Jamaican 
national team on May 18 and Go 
Ahead Eagles from the Dutch first 
division on May 28. All games will be * 
played at Lockhart Stadium in Fort 
Lauderdale, Also, on June 4, there 
will be two games played at the Or- 
ange Bowl in Miami. The first will be 
Haiti against Go Ahead Eagles, and 
the second will be the Strikers versus 
Santa Fe — a strong Colombian club 
team. 



The days when the Strikers' ros- 
ter was overloaded with veteran inter - 
national players is over. The team has 
been quietly filling its roster with en- 
ergetic, young Americans from local 
teams and colleges. But some experi- 
enced players remain. US 
International's Mark Chung and Steve 
Trittschuh add a wealth of talent to a 
team that recently signed four star 
players from Lynn University. 

"We are very excited to have Steve 
sign on with the Strikers'," said Strik- 
ers' head coach Thomas Rongen. 
"Steve has more than international 
and professional experience, he has 
world-class talent that we know will 
have a positive effect on our organiza- 
tion." 

In an entertainingexhibition game 
against IFK Ostersund of Sweden on 
April 9, the Strikers won 3-2 with 
goals byTrittschuh (56 minute) , Lenin 
Steenkamp {76 minute) and Ivan 
McKinley (89 minute) . McKMey's goal 
was from a penalty which clinched 
the game after the Swedish team had 
tied the game at 83 minutes with a 
goal, which was 'headed' in acciden- 
tally by Striker goalkeeper Reginald 
Pierre-Jerome. For information, 
please call (305)771-5677. 




Photo by Justin Knapfel 

The West Palm Beach Blaze repeat 

By JUSTIN KNAPFEL 
Sports Editor 

A competitive season led to playoffs full of sweeps. In the first round, 
Jacksonville swept Lakeland, and West Palm Beach swept Daytona 
Beach. In the finals, West Palm Beach swept Jacksonville. 

West Palm Beach was down constantly in the first game of the finals 
but kept coming back. They were led by Scott Luik's hat trick. Don Stone 
scored the winning goal in the 6-5 victory. In Jacksonville the next night, 
the Blaze won 3-2 . In the final game at West Palm Beach, the Blaze cruised 
to a second Sunshine Cup with a 9-2 victory. Scott Luik had seven goals 
in five playoff games, Daniel Vinetti and Chris Newans each had six 
assists. 

In the second season of play, West Palm Beach didn't dominate as 
they had in the first season. Blaze Coach Bill Nyrop was thrilled about a 
more competitive season. "I think it. was great," said Nyrop, "they 
(Jacksonville) were a very good team, a good group of guys." 

The third season of the Sunshine Hockey League will begin early 
November of 1994. There is a possibility of two new expansion teams next 
season. Some cities mentioned were: Tallahassee, Macon, GA, and 
Savannah, GA. "We have people who are interested in the league," said 
Nyrop, "It's just a matter of finding the ice and the rink." 



GEOGRAPHY QUIZ 
ANSWER^ FROM PAGE 9 



1. Nile 

2. Andes 

3. Haiti, Dominican Republic 

4. Sri Lanka 

5. Ukraine 



Four Seasons Ocean Grand 

The following positions are available 
just 10 minutes from Central Campus: 

• COOKS 

• PBX OPERATOR 

• NIGHT AUDITOR 

. SPA RECEPTIONIST 
• MINI -BAR ATTENDANT 

• HOST / HOSTESS 

• SERVERS - BANQUET'S, 
RESTAURANTS & ROOM SERVICE 

• BANQUET SET-UP 

APPLY AT: 

FOUR SEASONS OCEAN GRAND 

2800 S. Ocean Blvd., P. Bch. 

Mon-Wed, 9am- 12 & 2-4 

Pre-employment Drug Testing 

Smoke-free workplace. EOE 




PBCC»S S 993-94 LITERARY JOURNAL 



IS AVAILABLE 

AT THE FOLLOWING 

LOCATIONS: 

COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE 
CPI100; HUMANITIES OFFICE; 

UBRARV 3RD FLOOR 

CIRCULATION; DR, CAROLYN 

MARTIN'S OFFICE BA 508; PAUL 

GLYNN BUILDING; SAC LOUNGE; 

CAMPUS BOOKSTORE AND AIL 

PBCC CAMPUSES! 

APOLLO'S LUTE I $ 

NOW ACCEPTING 

SUBMISSIONS 

FOR ITS 

1994-95 EDITION 

— CONTACT 

DR. CAROLYN MARTIN 

AT MAIL STATION 47 

FOR FURTHER 

INFORMATION 



Mlltfillil'l'l'll!" 1 !!! 1 ! III! 1 H'FMI I' I li^ id l'i lfllVUK II 'l ^lb » l n f If 'l I I H llliiJi UHII Ml I I I I I I l| i 



Page 1 2 the BEACHCOMBER April 26, 1 994 



i ii TTiBiwrimiini 



ms»m)mamin . T j \mair 



%, 




STRANGE 





THE CROSSWORD 



1 



Jenkin's hopes vanished when 
he realized thai it was a hung jury. 




ACROSS 
1 Card holding 
5 City near Milan 
9 Gem surface 

14 Nautical term 

15 First place 

16 Win by — (edge 
out) 

17 Sch.mil. gp. 

18 Approach 

19 Like some roofs 

20 Money south of 
the border 

21 Stand 

23 Check or coat 

beginning 
25 Slip past 
28 Occur 
31 Monk's title 

33 Topers 

34 Related 
maternally 

35 Beloved ones 

37 It follows dry or 
tommy 

38 Serve food 

39 Sunbeam 

40 Championship 

42 Mornings for 
short 

43 "— were the 
days ..." 

45 Eastern ruler 

46 Small, secluded 
streets 

48 Make a choice 

49 Discovers 

50 Makes jubilant 

52 Bjom of tennis 

53 Scolds 
56 Stravinsky 
60 Broadside 

62 From — to 
riches 

63 Appellation 

64 Pittsburgh 
product 

65 Writer James 

66 Tied 

67 Concise 

68 Permits 

69 Dispatched 

DOWN 

1 Persist in 
nagging 

2 Afr. plant 



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©1994 Tribune Media Services, Inc. 
AH Rights Reserved 



ANSWERS 



3 Earns after 
expenses 

4 Enhance 

5 Soup ingredient 

6 "— a Grecian 
Urn" 

7 Transaction 

8 As to 

9 Lethal 

10 Ekbergand 
Bryant 

11 "Anything 
Goes" 
composer 

12Comp.pt. 
13 Actor Danson 
22 Bring up 
24 Wide awake 

26 Taken away 

27 Chemical 
compounds 

28 Turned into 

29 Glossy paint 

30 Composer of 
"Honeysuckle 
Rose" 

31 Banquet 



1 



S E T 81 
ONE A I 
FONDA 



E. JLJLO 

f-V E.i 

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32 Funny Martha 

35 Slump 

36 Guide 

41 Fantasizes 
44 Party giver 
47 Martin and Allen 
49 Red ink items 
51 School: Fr. 



52 Produce 

54 Russ. sea 

55 Frenzy 

57 Handed over 

58 Augury 

59 Landlord's due 

60 Concorde 

61 Consumed 



Get on the Fast Track at 
Florida Atlantic University! 

Weekend 
bachelor of 

business 
^ministration 




lasses Meet on Saturdays 
*AAGSB Accredited* 
Financial Aid Available • 



Find out if you qualify today! 

Call Peter Goumas, Program Coordinator, 

at (407) 367-2709, 







Newly developed 'Clipper Chip' 
enables the government to moni- 
tor the Internet, a worldwide 
computer network. see page 2 



fiorida Community College 
ssociatian 




1993 BEST DESIGN 

THIRD PLACE/STATE OF FLORIDA 



Joe Macy's death was devastat- 
ing to his Mends here at PBCC. 
They pour out their feelings of 
love and respect on pages 6 & 7. 



U 



Volume 55 Number 1 PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE ♦ LAKE WORTH, FLORIDA 



September 21, 1994 



J7"» t ""^-i»J ■ 

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Former chairman of the Social 
Science Department leaves 
behind many cherished friends 

After a five-year battle with cancer, 
Joseph Macy died May 19, 1994 

"We Love You Joe" 



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Friendships never end... 

Dr. Edward M. Eissey stands behind longtime 
friend Joe Macy at the All-College Awards 
Ceremony held May 6, 1994, where Macy 
was honored for his 25-years of service to 
PBCC. 



By CINDY N. HUNGER 
Special To The Beachcomber 

As I look up into the beautiful blue' sky, 
beyond the big white clouds, I wonder if Joe 
Macy is there. Because I imagine him, up there 
in Heaven, looking down to find his family and 
his friends at Palm Beach Community College. 
He'd make sure that everyone's all right just 
before he heads out for a jog to see his new 
home in Heaven. 

Here on earth Joe had a "hamm" radio in his 
office that allowed him to communicate with 
people around the world. But Heaven must 
have the ultimate hamm radio. And Joe would 
use It to radio his friends in Paradise. He 
learned his radio skills while serving in the U.S. 
Navy, and during emergencies here in Palm 
Beach County, Joe used those skills to help 
people. 



At some point, children there, in Heaven, 
would find this tall, gentle man — because they 
were crazy about him here. It was just some- 
thing about his manner. 

His back yard was a child's delight, filled 
with swings, birds flapping around in huge 
cages, and a whirlwind "sky ride." The ride 
consisted of a chair attached to a long wire that 
was tied between two trees. It carried the kids 
rapidly through the air for a sky ride that they 
would not soon forget. 

While his backyard was a perfect play park, 
his office was a prehistoric park — filled with 
models of dinosaurs and a huge air -filled Meso- . 
zoic bird that hung from the ceiling. 

The creatures were symbolic to Joe: he had 

Please see JOE 
page 4 



Today's 

students — 
stumped by 
relgious 
references? 

WhatdoestheTrinitymean? 
And who came first — Moses 
or Jesus? 

Professors say more students 
are handicapped in their 
studies by a lack of knowl- 
edge about Bible basics 

By CAROL MONAGHAN 
Special to the Beachcomber 

Walking on water. The forbid- 
den fruit. The troubles of Job. Con- 
quering Goliath. 

Increasingly, college students 
are finding themselves stumped 
by such welMcnown biblical refer - 
en |?es. ^though the Bible has been 
called the single most influential 
book in the history of Western cul- 



ture, many academics say it seems 
to be unfamiliar territory to more 
and more college students. 

"What some would consider 
basic elements of our culture, 
many students simply don't 
know," says Benjamin Wright, 
assistant professor of 
religion studies at 



Lehigh University in L^, ,^^,^ ,^ 
Bethlehem, Pa. "While ^m*>*m 
they may have heard 
of a reference, such 



as Ntff 



David and Goliath, in a non- 
contextual way, if you ask them 
to tell the story to you, they 
can't." 

"Students are ignorant 
about the Bible," says Jay Hol- 
stein, the J. J. Mallon Professor 
of Judiac Studies at the Uni- 
versity of Iowa in Iowa City. 

Academics say an increas- 
ing number of students are lost 
when they encounter biblical ref- 
erences in their coursework and 
day-to-day life. Without a basic 
knowledge of the stories in the 
New and Old Testaments, students 
have a difficult time understand- 
ing literary allusions in "Moby 
Dick" or even lyrics in U2 songs. 

"For certain, without some 
training in what is called religious 
studies, students will have abso- 
lute gaps in their knowledge and 
academic sense of literature, art 
and law in Western civilization, 
says Holstein, who teaches be-^ 






\7™^ 

y Bib 



tween eight to 10 courses that deal 
either specifically or implicitly with 
the Bible. 

'The biblical tradition is im- 
portant and essential to the de- 
— k velopment of Western culture," 

• >--4Pll\ says Mlcnael Coogan, pro- 
//C%\ fessor of religious 

L y I.,.,,.,,)) „, studies at Stonehill 

College in Boston and 
co-editor of the "Ox- 
ford Companion to the 
Bible" (University Press, 
1993). "You can't understand 
the various traditions of our 
society without some knowl- 
edge of the stories and history 
of the Bible." 

English professors say they 
can no longer assume stu- 
dents will comprehend the 
nearly limitless number of re- 
ligious allusions found in lit- 
erature, including such classics 
as John Milton's "Paradise Lost," 
William Faulkner's "Absalom, 
Absalom!," the poems of T.S. Elliot 
or the works of Shakespeare . 

M . Katherine McGrory says she 
recently found that only half of the 
students enrolled in her "Poetry in 
Drama" class at Georgetown Uni- 
versity said they had any familiar- 
ity with the Bible. 

"The class focused quite a bit 



on Yeats, who uses a lot of biblical 

Please see BIBLE 
page 5 



Are we ever 
prepared for 
Algebra? 
M really. 



By MAGDALA T. RAY 
Special to the Beachcomber 

Approximately 900 students at 
Central Campus are enrolled in 
MAT1024 Basic Algebra this fall. 
So what can the other 899 stu- 
dents and you expect from this 
course? 

Expect to spend 12 to 15 hours 
per week studying and practicing 
algebra. Expect to experience a 
variety of learning experiences in 
the classroom, CPI math lab, and 
CPI computer lab. Expect to re- 
ceive assistance from a variety of 
support services available through 
advisors, counselors, tutors, and 
Instructors. And finally, expect a 

Please see MATH 
page 9 



Page 2 



the BEACHCOMBER September 21 , 1 994 




Computer 6 nerds 9 awake! 
Uncle Sam is keyboardieg too 

Cyberspace is attracting very strange groups of people 
to its worldwide legion of telephone-connected com- 
puter networks known as the Internet. 
One especially troubling group is the U.S. Government! 

Hidden far beneath gothic, gray layercake blocks surrounded by 
barbed wire and stonefaced Marine guards, the happy "elves" at Govern- 
ment Research & Development labor at their endless task of introducing 
new, helpful widgets to make our lives better. 

Most recently added to this group of objects is the "Clipper Chip." A 

device that enables government 



ROBERT WIMBERLY 



Commentary 



agencies to monitor the activities 
on the Internet (a worldwide com- 
puter network begun by scientists, 
but now open to the public). And it 
goes without saying that it hasn't 
been met with much enthusiasm by 
the people who live on the other side of the wall. 

The government, fueled by its characteristiclly hysterical imagina- 
tion, paints the Internet as a world that is filled with perverts, terrorists 
and swindlers. We need, protection — they claim. 

The opposition, the citizens of the 'Net, paints essentially the same 
picture, except they feel that the best way to keep the 'Net free of this kind 
of vermin is to keep the government out of it. 

Objectively speaking, there are cads enough for both sides. If it 
weren't for the virus launchers and hackers and the problems they cause, 
the normally self-serving and oblivious juggernaut that is government 
might never have been aroused. It has become necessary for some sort 
of regulation to be installed; turning on your modem these days has 
become similar to deliberately exposing your computer to AIDS. 

This is not to say that government regulation is a solution either. The 
government's way of doing things generally serves best as a negative 
example. But it's important to make a distinction between the govern- 
ment in its ..abstract, form and those individuals who uphold it. One 
cannot blame a theoretical entity for its poor execution. 

The primary cause of the dispute is one of freedom. The Internet is a 
free society where tolerance of views and the right to privacy are key 
factors. It tends to regulate itself with little more than a high ethical 
standard and loose organizations of "police" who are brought in to deal 
with problems that are too big or too technical to be handled with simple 
integrity. The government, on the other hand, takes the view that this is 
not freedom — that it's chaos, freedom's evil twin. Goverment operates 
under the simple Machaivellian dictum that men are inherently bad, and 
need to be supervised at all times. It may seem to be working now, but will 
quickly fall apart if someone (U. Sam) doesn't, come in and present the 
shadow of centralized authority. 

This brings us to the most important point to be pondered — that of 



Shut up! and play ball 



By STACEY SKINNER and 
D.S. ULLERY 
Stajf Reporters 

"... for it's one , two , three strikes 
you're out! At the old ball game!" 
Seems to have a whole new mean- 
ing now, doesn't it? We have a very 
serious problem with what's been 
happening. These so-called "base- 
ball players" are whining and cry- 
ing because they're salaries are 
being capped at 3 million dollars a 
year. Well let's hold a pity party. 

It's not as "if these guys are 
being asked to perform anything 
as difficult as neurosurgery. The 
game they play isn't even as dan- 
gerous as, say, football. What's slid- 
ing into homeplate compared to 
having a defensive line trying to 
sack you before the pig-skin can 
leave your hand? Granted, inju- 
ries do occur (as they will in any 
sport), but with baseball they just 
aren't all that frequent. 

Let's look at the game for a 
second shall we? A group of nine 
men take turns standing beside a 
slab of vinyl, shaped like a penta- 
gon and try to hit a ball with a piece 
of polished lumber. REAL difficult 



These so-called 
'baseball players' are 
whining and crying 
because their salaries 
are being capped at 3 
million dollars a year, 
Well let's hold a pity 
party. 



Time to get serious. We think 
it's about time that every profes- 
sional athlete in America find a 
dictionary and re-learn the mean- 
ing of the word "game." While 
everyone has sports heroes they 
admire (ourselves included), it is 
ridiculous to even pretend to con- 
done this type of irresponsible be- 
havior. To the striking players we 
can only deliver this warning: The 
same spectators you're alienating 
by striking are the only reason you 
have a salary to begin with. So do 
us all a favor: 
SHUT UP AND PLAY!!! 



September 21, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 3 



Editor/Layout 
Associate Editor 
News Editor 
Entertainment Editor 

Advertising Manager 



the BEACHCOMBER 



— - I993 — 

Florida Community College Press Association 

Award Winners 

— George P. Reis — 

First place Best Arts Review & 

Second place In-depth Reporting. 

— Robert G. Gerard — 
Third place Sports Photo. 

— the Beachcomber — 
Third place Design/layout. 



Mike Mltsefl 

Jim Stravino 

Stacey Skinner 

D,S. UHery 

Judie Caaavant 



Contributing Reporters/Photographers 

Lady Parker, D.S Ullery, Art Kennedy, Loura Lafayette, 

Chris Harris, Robert Wimberly, Tom Maniotis, Shireen Mohan, and 

Althea Stokes (Cartoonist). 

Opinions expressed in the Beachcomber do not necessarily reflect 
the views of the Beachcomber or Palm Beach Community College. 
Letters to the Editor must be signed. 



Palm Beach Community College 

BEACHCOMBER 

4200 Congress Avenue 

Dr. Edward M. Eissey ^ e Worth - FL 33461-4796 
President/Publisher ' (407) 439-8064 Fax (407) 439-8210 





Ms. Vicki Scheurer 
Faculty Adviser 



Objectively speaking, there are cads enough for 
both sides. If it weren't for the virus launchers 
and hackers and the problems they cause, the 
normally self-serving and oblivious juggernaut 
that is government might never have been 
aroused. 



freedom, or at least lip service to it. 

In the Gettysburg Address, Lin- 
coln began with the intention of 
dedicating the cemetery at Arling- 
ton, and ended up by posing the 
question of whether or not democ- 
racy, and, by extension, freedom, 
are even possible in human af- 
fairs. And today, in our experi- 
ence, it seems more and more that 
when people speak of freedom, 
what they are really talking about 
is impunity. Of personal power to 
exercise aquisitive interests un- 
fettered by conscience or to be 
individually gratified, usually at 
the expense of others, and to be 
legally enabled to do it. 

Look at us now: scratch any 
conservative and you'll find some- 
one whose interests are currently 
being met, who has the luxury of 
complacency and cares about 
nothing else. Scatch any liberal 
and you'll find somene who is shut 
out of complacency, an underdog 
looking for his turn to become a 
consevative. 

And so it turns out that free- 
dom in the context that American 
society is based on is little more 
than an endless mechanism of 
table-turning, going all the way 
back to the beginning. Groups of 
common interest who lacked the 
wit or strength to overcome their 
circumstances, setting up shop 
elsewhere and evolving into a 
nearly identical system to the one 
they ran from, but based on differ- 
ent ideals. 

Is the Internet another instance 
of the same thing? A geek revolu- 
tion? A running ground for 
whackos to hatch plots and dis- 
seminate their ideas? Or is it a 
tribe of people escaping from me- 
dia and corporate brainwashing 
by allowing anything to happen 
and then picking and choosing the 
things that suit them? 

The best answer to that ques- 
tion can be determined by apply- 
ing the rule of dvnamic interaction 



— that a thing cannot exis L with! 
out its opposite. To see who the? 
are, find out who they are trying ti 
shut out. 



I 

V 



tHE PBCC 

FOUNDATION IS 

SELLING RAFFLE 

TICKETS FOR A 

1995 JAGUAR XJ6. 

aLL PROCEEDS 

WILL BENEFIT 

SCHOLARSHIPS AT 

PBCC. jUST 900 
TICKETS WILL BE 

SOLD FOR $100 

EACH. tHE CAR l S 

VALUED AT 

$52,000. tHE 

WINNING TICKET 
WILL BE 
W- PULLED ON 

DECEMBER 3, 1994 

I AT THE BREAKERS. 
w WINNER NEED NOT 
Mm BE PRESENT. 



iF YOU WANT 
_ TO TRY TO 
O WIN THIS 
|^ FABULOUS CAR, 

PLEASE CALL 

E 439-8072. 

; J 








CENTRAL CAMPUS 




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SPORTS 



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Page 4 the BEACHCOMBER .September 21, 1994 



September 21, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 5 



ATEWS! 

jf W the Beachcomber JlJm 



Ken Marion, president of student 
government, gears up for election 



By STACEY SKINNER 
News Editor 

What does deep-sea fishing, a 
cruise, a masquerade ball, and a 
family-day picnic have in common? 
Give up? 

It's all part of SGA President 
Ken Marion's campaign. Says 
Marion, "I want to have social in- 
teraction with the student body, 
and [one of the] number of things 
we said we'd be doing is a salt- 
water fishing tournament." The 
tournament will be held Sept. 24 
off the Blue Heron drift boat docked 
in Riviera Beach. In order to make 
this event accessible for students 
admission is only $15 (including 
lunch) instead of the regular $20, 
student government will subsidize 
the rest. First prize for the biggest 
fish is $200; a new rod and reel for 
second; and two free fishing passes 
aboard the boat 

Ir i biTuC 11 n 



out their family." The admission 
will be $3 per person or $5 per 
couple. Children under 12 are free. 
There will be a live D.J. , games for 
adults including Softball, volley- 
ball, tug-of-war, and badminton 
and even a clown for the kids. 

If family day doesn't ring your 
bell, not to worry. The SGA has 
lined up another cruise, but Marion 
promises that "we're going to make 
this one better. The problem we 
had last year was that the stu- 
dents had age restrictions on the 
friday night party cruise." This 
year, the SGA is going with the 
Viking Princess where there is no 
age limit. The price will be the 
same — $25 per person. This takes 
place Oct. 14, the bus will pick 
students up at 5:30 p.m. in front of 
the gym, the ship will depart at 7 
p.m. 

Fma'V -in Nov 5, there will be 



3 "» (h L "f 

n it in 

i lt.StilH u 



III 



t 

I I 



l'i 



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ft! JUj 

i r 



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1 



J li]0 3 J 



ini> 



ji tl lectmiig m* 

a ill be a good way foi them to bi mg 



'd ^'- } < » l'i vi in n hi 

lllabL. <J jv_v.ri Villi ptOv t< Jv_ IIlc c k 

id iou at no tnaige Guys if you 
take the flier to Mr. Tux you will get 



any tuxedo plus shoes for $55, and 
ladies, ifyou take the flier to David's 
Bridals, you will get a 25% dis- 
count. 

All of this fun and festivity is in 
lieu of Marion's upcoming cam- 
paign for SGA president. Is he keep- 
ing his running mates? Answers 
Marion, 'This term, we're going to 
be doing it a lot differently than we 
did last year. This year the presi- 
dent will run by himself." 

Once a president is elected, he 
will choose his cabinet members. 
Central Campus Dean of Student 
Services, Scott MacLachlan and 
Student Activity Coordinator, Es- 
ther Stewart sat down with SGA 
President Ken Marion to discuss 
different methods of electing a stu- 
dent government body. The Cen- 
tral Campus is the only campus to 
hold elections for a complete ticket. 
The North and South campuses 
hold elections through their 
Interclub Council. 

"We didn't want to have the 
problems of people putting together 
a ticket just to campaign," said 
Marion; "In the past, every ticket 
that has come together has not 
stayed together." 

Looking back on this past year. 
Marion is pleased with all thai, has 
been done. His advice to future 
student government, presidents is 
to be dedicated to the job. It takes 
a lot of time and most of it you don't 
get paid for. 



Central ( iimnus Meeliiius 



s. loss js, Heaveio; gain. 



JOE/. 

from front page 

been called "The Dinosaur" by colleagues who thought 
him too outdated in his thinking. But as the man in charge 
of the county's police academy, Joe felt an obligation to 
never let an officer forget the importance of knowing how 
to use his hands and mind to get out of trouble. 

He would ask, "What happens when an officer forgets 
his baton, an attacker grabs his gun, or the mace can is 
empty? He drew upon his training in the military during 
World War II, his FBI Academy training, and his 17 years 
on the West Palm Beach Police force (where he served as 
the assistant chief) to train his students. 

His family aside, Joe was proudest of his award as the 
number one graduate of the FBI Academy. He kept news- 
paper stories about it, along with photos of his family, 
carefully preserved in his desk. When he directed the 
Criminal Justice Department, It was fun when a student 
arrived for counseling with a child or two alongside 
Because I knew it would only be minutes before Joe would 
pull out a magic trick from his desk. His jovial manner 
didn t stop with youngsters. 

I remember my first interview with him. I wanted to 
work at the college, but worried I would not fit into the 
Criminal Justice Department. My fears melted like snow 
on a warm day when Joe gave me such a friendly greeting 

I see you worked for a newspaper in Palm Beach," he 

ScilCL 

"Yes," I said. 

Beachr 6 PlZZa '" hC Said ' " h ° W d ° ^ Serve " M Palm 

I didn't know what to say. "I guess on sterling-silver 

broken 8 ^ We b0th laUghed> ^ ice had *"» 

^JSfJ^f? ofhi i de Partment was of concern to Joe. 
Sometimes it was funny because he would get upset 

2S? ^ n police academ y stude * ts w£3d 

Skea irial 1^ lsst udytag nearby. It could have looked 
taUnY! hfJt '£"! r ? ther ^ a strtct P oll <* school 

s?™* t^' But 0f course toe students loved it! 
him tn^nw 8 1^ 1 * 11 nuts ' t0 °- Like a* time I asked 
Sutta bel"^ ??*£** y °T g lad y>" When * she " turne ° 
aftemarrit ^h ^ T f ° rget &at ^ He said to me 

for hlto S;TS T T /? ** academ -y students comes * 

must i^iuS^ 1 ^ ahke ta ^ eir uniform s. The women 
che^Hf vl^h T UP ° rWearit P uIledback - Lookattheir 
tVJ IZ £?* l u - t0 see tf **"* *" male or female." 
assume anttSK? ^embedded ln me forever was not to 
SXt-fK? g< ^? en someone ma de a comment with- 

us to^Snk Lf y ; l U l y ° U d0n,t ^^ that " He wan *ed 
us to think about what we were saying. Sudden conclu- 



Joe loved people. As long as 
you did your job he gave you 
the world. I know wherever he 
is, it must foe a nicer place now 
that he's there. 



sions, he would say, cause problems at best. 

For me, Joe was someone who could take a 
rainy day, and fill at least a section of it with 
sunlight. In the five years that I was his secretary, 
I had some heartbreaking times concerning my 
daughters. It was Joe who would rearrange my 
thinking. He would make me see how ridiculous 
life can be, and, by doing that, take the weight, 
almost too heavy to carry, off my shoulders. He 
could make me laugh when I really wanted to cry. 

My daughters adored him. Once, when we 
joined the Macy's for dinner at a restaurant, my 
girls became energetic and ran around, and then 
they took off. Joe saw the worried look on my face 
as I ran after them. When they returned to the 
table, Joe stood and took off his belt. The girls 
looked at him wide-eyed. Quietly he put them 
back to back, then belted them together, not too 
tight but not too loose. They laughed and had 
more fun that night in their silly position and 
couldn't wait for him to do it again. 

When my daughters found out Joe was sick, 
they wanted to bring him a card and treats. My 
younger child picked a cute get-well card, but my 
older daughter selected something slightly dif- 
ferent. On the outside it showed a teddy bear 
looking up at a starry sky, and upon it was 
written, "One day I wished upon a star and you 
came true." 

I saw Joe just before he died. Though I don't 
think he could see me, I do believe he knew my 
voice because he squeezed my hand. Joe loved 
people. As long as you did your job he gave you 
the world. I know wherever he is, it must be a 
nicer place now that he's there. 



Nanny Needed: 

for 14-month old baby. Part time. 

Call Robert or Janet at 966- 1 75 1 . 



PBGC Ptoyeis/Thea tre Club 

meets every other Thursday at 
1 1:45 a.m. in the Duncan Theatre/ 
west entrance. Contact Mrs. Sunny 
Meyer at 437-8139 for more infor- 
mation. 

Inter Club Council flCC. 

Meetings are held every Thursday at 
1:30 p.m. in the SAC LOUNGE, all 
students are invited to participate. 



Early Childhood Citato meets the 
third Thursday of each month: 
Oct. 21, Nov. 4, Nov. 18, Dec. 9. 
from 12:15 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. in 
SC 113. Contact Sue Haines at 
439-8046 or in SC 114. 



for International 
UndnytMyfln g fsIU) club meets 
every Wednesday at 3:00 p.m. in 
the cafeteria. Contact Dantta Kurtz 
at 439-8233 for more information. 

T he OammatCT C Inib/DPM A t- 1 
interested in nt-w member,, th>-v 
meet the tlnnl ? ,>tuid,i\ u! v.uh 
month at 10ii.it? t ,« Im U'o.i |-n 



GMM&^M&S3Mkisa_Jlna hole [;■, 
meetings in SS203 at 7 p.m. Cull 
686-0970 for more information . 
CURRENTLY NOT MKETING. 



Student GovermmBnt Associa- 
tion (SQA1 meets every Tuesday 
at 2:30 p.m. in the Student 
Activities Center (SAC), all 
students are encouraged to 
attend! Call 439-8228. 



Collegiate Music Krfn ^tore Na- 
tional Conference (CMENC) meets 
every other Tuesday at 1:30 p.m, in 
Rm. 110 in Humanities Bldg.? For 
more info, call Bob Jones at 439-8142. 

Student Nurses A««nr.| fl ^nn 
(SNA), meets every Thursday 
from 1p.m. to 2 p.m. Contact 
Easter Arora at 439-8362. 



Delta Hn "fcfjrtrrT"^ 
Th«tfl ""pp° meets every other 
Sunday in Continuing Education 
(CE 121) at 7pm. Next meeting 
Oct. 2. New members welcome, 
for more information contact Mr. 
Hamlin in BA 110 or call 439- 
8229. 



of Amerio fpuqaj mee ts Tues., 
Wed. and Sundays. Dates were 
unavailable at press time. 

For more Information please 
call Susan Thompson at 641-0345. 

Student » eaon«»e fonndl 
IS^CJ meets every Thursday at 5 
p.m. in the cafeteria. CURRENTLY 
NOT MEETING. 



TOHA\KYOIJU 
MEiaii\GSLISTKl> 

iilliiiiiiiii 



Professors: lack of Biblical 
knowledge hurts students studying 
English or American literature 



BIBLE/ 

from front page 

imagery," says McGrory, who is 
also executive director of the So- 
ciety of Values in Higher Educa- 
tion, a non-sectarian, non-profit 
society of scholars in Washing- 
ton. 

Meanwhile, 18.1 percent of all 
college freshman last year listed 
their religious preference as 
"none," according to the Higher 
Education Research Institute at 
the University of California Los 
Angeles. 

Still, the majority of all college 
freshman, 82.2 percent, reported 
having attended religious services 
"frequently" or "occasionally" dur- 
ing the past, year, the UCLA sur- 
vey says. 

"A Gallup poll a few years back 
stated that 90 percent of Ameri- 
can households own a Bible. I 
suspect most do not read it, how- 
ever," says Coogan. He believes 
the Bible should be introduced 
into the curriculum at more high 
schools and colleges. 

'The problem is that people 
tend to think of the Bible exclu- 
sively as a religious text, and those 
who teach the Bible are under 
suspicion of proselytizing," he 
says. The issue can be an espe- 
cially sticky one at state-sup- 
ported institutions, he adds. 

Nationwide, of the 2,318 col- 
lege and universities that offer a 
bachelor's degree or better, 25 
percent of all public universities 
and 65 percent of all private col- 
leges have programs in religion 
and theological studies, accord- 
ing to a survey by the American 
Academy of Religion in Atlanta. 

David Hoekema, academic 
dean at Calvin College in Grand 
Rapids, Mich., says many colleges 
affiliated with religious institu- 
tions continue to offer courses 
that cover the Bible as part of the 
core requirements needed for 
graduation. "But I wouldn't ex- 
pect there to be any consistent 
program or intention for public 



institutions to make a course on 
the Bible as part of core require- 
ments," he adds. "That would raise 
red flags to many." 

Coogan says he doesn't agree 
with some of the hand-wringing that 
he sees among professors who say 
the lack of historical and cultural 
knowledge among students impedes 
their ability to teach the classics. 

"Yes, we have students who don't 
know who came first — Moses or 
Jesus," he says. "But we're there to 
teach students what they don't 
know and dispel ignorance. I say we 
need to start from where students 
are and work with what they know." 

That's one reason why many 
religious-studies academics are 
going back to the basics in an at- 
tempt to reach students. 

Teaching the Bible at a secular 
institution often involves walking a 
fine line for an instructor, says Hol- 
stein. Without teaching the intel- 
lectual content of the Bible, he could 
be accused of just preaching. But 
by focusing only on the intellectual 
nature of the texts, students could 
miss "how wonderful and awful it is 
to be a human being." 

Wright recently launched a 
course for freshman at LeHigh en- 
titled , "Howto Read the Bible." While 
enrollments in traditional Old Tes- 
tament and NewTestament courses 
remain down, the seminar was full. 
Meanwhile, inquiries from more 
than 30 upperclass students led 
Wright to open the course this sum- 
mer to all students. 

"You can use the Bible for devo- 
tion and draw inspiration from its 
drama, its Insight into the human 
condition, its ordinariness, its mys- 
tery," says Wright. 

"I want students to learn to ar- 
gue from the text, not just spout 
opinions," he adds. 

One student who took Wright's 
class says it helped him under- 
stand a passage in his English class 
in which Shakespeare likens Othello 
to Job. "I never would have picked 
up on it" without the seminar, says 
freshman Jason Bustard, a biology 
major from Kintnersville, Pa. 




Upcoming Events 

Student Government fCentral Campus): 

PBCC Central Campus Club Fair 

Free food and music 

When: Sept. 20-21 

Where: Business Administration Patio 

Time: 10:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. 

1st Annual PBCC Saltwater Fishing Tournament 

When: Sept. 24 

Where: Blue Heron Drift Boat . ; ' . 

389 East Blue Heron Blvd. 

Riviera Beach 

Cost: $15 (includes rod and reel, bait, tackle and lunch). 

Time: 8:30 a.m. — 12:30 p.m. 

First place for biggest fish caught is*$200; Second place well receive a new 

rod and reel; Third place will receive two fishing passes. Sign-up in the 

Student: Activities Center (SAC Lounge). For.more information, contact 

Ken Marion at 439-8228 or 8359. 

Family-Day Picnic 

When: Oct. 8 

Where: John Prince Park (adjacent to college) 

Time: 11 a.m. — 7 p.m. 

Cost: $3 per person, $5 per couple 

Bar-B-Q ribs, chicken, hamburgers, hot dogs, baked beans, 

potato salad, macaroni salad, coleslaw, and soft drinks. Plus, 

volleyball, tug-of-war, badminton and horseshoes. Also, a clown 

for the children. 

Second Annual Friday Night Party Cruise 

Where: Aboard the Viking Princess 

When: Friday, Oct. 21 

Cost: $25 per person 

Deadline: Register by Oct. 14. 

Bus is leaving at 5:30 p.m. from in front of the gymnasium (Central 

Campus). Ship departs at 7 p.m., returns at 1 a.m. There will be a 

sit-down dinner and a buffet. Sign-up in the SAC lounge. 

Black-Tie Masquerade Ball 
Where: Omni Hotel, 

1601 Belvedere Road, 

West Palm Beach (across from the airport) 
When:--Ncw..5 ■ ■ 

Time: 8 p.m. - 1 a.m. and dinner at 9 p.m. 
Cost: $10 per person or $15 per couple. 
For more information contact SGA at 439-8228. 
Deadline: Oct. 21. 

8th Annual Golf Tournament 

When: Oct. 22 

Call Susan Thompson at 439-8124 for more information. 

Two-hundred dollar teams (4-person teams). 

Palm Beach Blood Bank 

Sept. 21-22 

Free T-Shirt & Cholesterol Count. 



liiiiiilllll 



A -fL A 



DELTA 



OMEGA ALPHA 



Sign up today ! 



Join the frat guys and sorority sisters for 

Pledging, Rush Week, Road Trips, and 

Parties! 



CALL THE DELTA HOUSE AT 585-3664 OR DROP 
BY AT PANTHER PARK APARTMENT #20 



!■ ill i j i i l ii loj ar ia m 



Page 6 



the BEACHCOMBER September 21 , 1 994 



September 21 , 1 994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 7 







Pets... 

Macy with his pet iguana, 

David Duncan 

Professor of English 

Palm Beach Community College 

My biological father never lived with us; I 
was raised by my grandmother, my mothe.r and 
my sister. While they supported my dreams and 
endeavors, they could never provide me with 
what I needed — and that was a father. 

Growing up without a father was not easy. 
However, God in His infinite wisdom, provides 
us who are fatherless with "father" figures 
throughout our- lives, if we but allow ourselves 
to be opened to this phenomenon. 

One earthly Dad-like person who God pro- 
vided to me was Joe Macy, who recently went to 
be with the Lord. 

When I think about Joe Macy, I think about 
a man who always took the time to speak to 
many people, enlightening their minds and 
hearts. When I think about Joe Macy, I think 
about a man who whenever he said "Good 
morning," never said it without attaching my 
name to that greeting and waiting to see what 
my response was going to be. When I think 
about Mr. Joseph Macy, I think about how 
blessed I have truly been to be on the faculty 
along with such an outstanding man, a "Dad in 
Deed." 




Friends... 

■ L-R: George King, James Mailory and Joe — 1949. 



Sandra Richmond 
Professor Social Science 

Joe was magic — literally. Whenever children 
were close by, Joe would give them attention. He'd 
pull a magic trick from his pocket, much to their 
delight. 

That is just on example of his extraordinary 
capacity to share, to love, to make people happy. 

His kindness coupled with high expectations has 
had a profound, positive impact on my life and 
teaching. 

His magic lives onl 



John Townsend, 

Co-Director, Florida/Canada Institute 

If asked to identify the one person to whom I most 
frequently looked up to, and the one who most closely 
identified and lived his personal philosophy of kind- 
ness and good will to his fellow man (both on the job 
and in his home life) I would have to tell you that it was 
Joe Macy. 

That was one of the reasons that I asked Joe to 
accompany me on a trip to Ottawa, Canada a few years 
ago. This was an official visitation to Algonquin College 
during which we formulated the idea of having Algon- 
quin and PBCC become sister institutions. 

Joe had never traveled to Canada prior to this trip. 
Every experience was new and wonderful! He had the 
opportunity to see the Canadian Parliament in action, 
to teach Canadian students on U.S. law and to meet 
with the administrators of the Royal Canadian Mounted 
Police Academy. 

But what did Joe find the most interesting? Schlem- 
ins Ale! For months after our return, he talked about 
this remarkable find. Not about the Royal Canadian 
Mounted Police, Parliament nor about his teaching 
experience at Algonquin. No, it was Schlemins Ale! 

Joe was a staunch supporter of the Florida/Canada 
Institute; and to our efforts to develop a Canadian 
Studies program at PBCC. 

But, I am going to miss most his sense of loyalty to 
his college and his friends. 



''RutlrOin'e "'"'"" 
Secretary, Social Science 

Joe, to me, symbolized all that is good in mankind. 
He was an honest, ethical, loyal person with a great 
sense of humor. He was super intelligent, had a very 
inquisitive mind — one that enjoyed interacting and 
helping people whenever he could. He also enjoyed 
relaying events from the past that were both amusing 
and enlightening to all who had the privilege of hearing 
his stories. I truly enjoyed the three years I was 
honored to be his secretary in the Social Science 
Division. 



Nancy Buhl 

Research Specialist PBCC 

I met Joe Macy 18 years ago when I was hired by 
John Schmiederer and we "rented" rooms in the Crimi- 
nal Justice complex when the Allied Health building 
was still on the drawing boards. 

A year later when we were relocated, Joe liked to 
say that he kicked us out because we didn't pay our 
rent! 

Joe was always a very warm and friendly person 
with a good sense of humor. He was very proud to show 
me pictures of his first grandchild — crawling and 
playing with Joe's rather large pet iguana! 

It's hard to believe he is not here and I will always 
miss solving the world's problems with him. 



RaquelJ. Lim 
Accountant PBCC 

Six years ago, Mr. Macy approached me and imme- 
diately knew that I came from the Philippines. He 
shared his memories when he was in the Navy in the 
1940s. He described the country, customs, food and 
people vividly. In fact, he even tried to communicate 
with me through my native language. 

Every time I saw him around, he asked me the 
translation of some phrases and we always parted with 
|he word "Mabuhay" which means welcome. Further- 
more, he was updated with the political affairs of our 
country. 

With the experiences I had with him, I felt proud of 
my ethnic background and I observed that he was a 
simple man who was full of family values and morals. 




SAFELY HOMF 

I am home in Heaven, dear ones; 

Oh, so happy and so bright! 
There is perfect joy and beauty 

In this everlasting light. 

All the pain and grief is over. 

Every restless tossing passed; 
I am now at peace forever, 

Safely home in Heaven at last. 

Did you wonder I so calmly 

Trod the valley of the shade? 

Oh! but Jesus' love illumined 
Every dark and fearful glade. 

And He came Himself to meet me 
In that way so hard to tread; 

And with Jesus arm to lean on, 
Could I have one doubt or dread? 

Then you must not grieve so sorely, 
For I love you dearly still: 

Try to look beyond earth's shadows, 
Pray to trust our Father's Will. 

-, : There is work still waiting for you, 
So you must not idly stand; 
Do it now, while life remaineth — 
You shall rest in Jesus' land. 

When that work is all completed, 
He will gently call you Home; 

Oh, the rapture of that meeting, 
Oh, the joy to see you come! 



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JOEM 
REME 




Department for 

19, 1994 after a 

! A behind fellow 

were touched by 

Dr. Edward M. 
iach Community 
tlow students at 



By CINDY NORMAN 
Special to 'the Beach 

Director of the Crini 
many years, Joseph Ma 
long battle with cancer) 
instuctors, staff and stts 
his warmth and professf; 

Among Macy's many 
Eissey, current president 
College. Eissey and Mai 
PBJC 46-years ago. . 

Macy returned to PD ^he used his mili- 
tary experience, his mar b a police officer, 
and his academic and FB pto develop a large 
criminal-justice training r 

Long-time friend Eis; if 

"My most memorable ttoas when we met 
46-years ago at Palm Be |r College, and as 
our careers developed, J^Supported, loved 
and remained loyal to tltgfie w as [also] the 
kind of friend who would fey dark alley with 
you, without ever askingf" 




<Joe and 

his wife 
Shirley, 
in Miami 
(April 
1949). 



Eileen 1 8 olden 
Chairman, Department of 
Communications 

There are so many things that I 
will remember about Joe. He was so 
positive in his outlook toward life. 
He always had a cheery greeting 
every morning when I saw him on 
campus. Joe was a wonderful col- 
league and friend. I miss him very 
much. 



Undersheriff 
Charles McCutcheon 
PBC Sheriff's Office 

I think he was one of the pio- 
neers as far as training, educating 
and professionalizing the police of- 
ficers in this area. He was just a 
fantastic person and educator. We 
first met in the early 1960s, when I 
was a lieutenant with the Boca Ra- 
ton Police Department. 

We also shared similar memories 
of our FBI Academy training. 



MaryAnn Reasner 
Property Records Coordinator 

My remembrance of Mr. Macy 
brings to mind a person of integrity 
and sincerity; but foremost, a "true 
gentleman." 



Shelley Hill 
Human Resources 

Joe Macy was a caring, compas- 
sionate man who 1 grew to respect 
and admire. He always returned 
phone calls, resolved problems in a 
timely manner and was a truly dedi- 
cated, loyal employee of Palm Beach 



Mike Miles 

Professor of Psychology 

I think of his courage. He 
kept talking about how he was 
going to go to Texas and beat 
this [cancer]. He wanted to 
come to work (even though he 
was sick) to be there for his 
teachers in the Social Science 
Department. He said many 
times he'd rather be at the col- 
lege than anywhere else. 

The only worry he expressed 
was for his wife and children, 
the school, and everyone who 
worked for him. I know he'd be 
very happy to know Joel Rear- 
don is the new chairman, and 
that someone who understands 
the division is in charge. Joe 
made my problems seem small. 



Robert Flores (Supervisor) 
Custodial Department 

Anytime there was a prob- 
lem in his department that af- 
fected the custodians, he would 
take care of it right away. The 
college, lost a great gentleman. 
There are very few people you 
find like that. He respected ev- 
eryone. 



Judge James Carlisle 
PBC Courthouse 

I've known Joe for years. 

I first met him when I was a 
prosecutor in 1967. He was a 
West Palm Beach police officer. 
I also was on a couple of boards 
with him at St. Anne's Church. 
He was the most squared-away 
guy. He was so organized r He 
was straight forward. He had 
high standards, and he de- 
manded excellence. 

There is no way he would be 
satisfied with anything slip- 
shod. 

What stands out in my mind 
about Joe most of all, though, 
was something that I found out 
about after he died. 

I called Joe's office and 
spoke for a lew minutes to Joe's 
secretary, Ruth Cline. She told 
me that she had found him on 
a chair near the entrance to his 
office. When she asked why he 
was there, he said , That's as far 
as I can get.' That's how sick he 
was, but. that was so typical of 
Joe. Most people would have 
stayed home, but he went to 
work. 



Joel Brady Reardon 
Chairman, Social Science 

The special memory I have 
of Joe Macy concerns our mu- 
tual military experience. 

Joe was in the Navy and 
caught the tail-end of World 
War II. I was in the Marines 
during Vietnam. Our attitudes 
and perspectives were amaz- 
ingly similar in spite of our gen- 
erational difference. 

And like most veterans, we 
tended to center on the humor- 
ous experiences and the ver- 
nacular used to express them. 
I remember us laughing so 
much at things only veterans 
would find hilarious and being 
able to communicate effectmiv 
with very few words. 

It's the laughter I remember 
about Joe and how I always 
wished we couldVe served to- 



r ■'■ 4<f ■ } * 







Duty... 



Glen Marsteller, 
Chairman Science, 
Engineering, Physical Education 

I first met Joe Macy when he was hired as 
an instructor at PBCC to teach Criminal Jus- 
tice classes. My initial impression of Joe was 
that he had more energy than he deserved and 
a great amount of zeal for his subject matter. 

As I came to know Joe better over the 
years, I was impressed with his dedication to 
his family; there was never any doubt in my 
mind that family was Joe's number-onye pri- 
ority. 

As his family grew and left the nest, Joe 
expanded his avocational interests from Ham 
radipto wood -working and camping. As in his 
vocation, Joe .worked for; perfection. r =r ,, t,- r 

When I sit back and conjure up a vision of 
Joe, what I can't ignore is those wild ties he 
was famous for. Whether dinosaurs, cartoon 
characters, wild geometric prints or a Christ- 
mas tie in April; Joe's vision in my mind will 
always be accentuated with a wild tie. 

And so, in those quiet times when! think 
about Joe, my friend and colleague, and re- 
member his voice, I see a man who loved his 
family and the college, a man who never 
refused a cry for help, a man who loved work- 
ing with his hands, a man who loved God and 
his church, and a man the likes of whom I'll 
never meet again and who I miss. 




Instructor... 



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*9 




Page 8 



the BEACHCOMBER September 21, 1994 



ENTERTAINMENT 

M, m the Beachcomber -^- 




r I 'i (iiniili in. (lien am 



ByTOMMAMOTIS 
Staff Reporter 

Peter, Peter, Peter — Gary Grant 
might have remarked. Cliches also 
come to mind; "Wine improves with 
age," "you can't keep a good man 
(or musician) down," and, "the 
cream always rises to the top." 

All these could apply to Peter 
Frampton, the ever resilient, taste- 
ful guitarist-performer, and by far 
the best of the 1970s rockers to 
restart their careers In the 1990s. 

Some are returning for the 
greenbacks. But I get the feeling 
that Frampton's talent and musi- 
cal gifts are driven by his heart and 
soul. He has to be out there per- 
forming and recording to be con- 
tent. And Frampton's management 
realized to launch a comeback, you 
must start somewhere. And where 
better to begin a new begining but 
at the intimate Sunrise Musical 



Left — 

Peter Frampton 

performing in the 
early 1970s. 
Right — 

Frampton attempts 
a comback in the 
1990s. 



Center, located west of Fort Lau- 
derdale — a brilliant choice I 

Opening act Robin Trower set 
the stage for Frampton by playing 
an inspiring blues-rock set that 
included most of his legendary hits. 

Then the lights dimmed and 
the song, The Bigger They Come, 
The Harder They Fall" played 
through the sound system. It 
played in tribute to Frampton's 
long-time friend and co-musician 
Steve Marriott, who tragically 
passed away just as they were re- 
forming another Humble Pie-type 
band. Three cuts from their col- 
laboration appear on Framption's 
"Collection" CD. This CD is worth 
buying just for the three pearls 
mentioned above: The best two of 
the three are "The Bigger They Are" 
and "I Won't Let You Down." 

Frampton and Marriott, in my 
opinion, are equal to John Lennon 
and Paul McCartney. As soloists, 
they were very good, even great, 
but together they were magical — 
a phenomenal combination. What 



MANTIS. NEEDSMORE 
EXCITEMENT AND B ETTERSC RIPT5 

By D.S.UIXERY 
Entertainment Editor 

Superhero shows are nothing new in the annals of televison dating 
back as far as the late George Reeves' classic "Superman" series. 
Recently weve seen excellent series' such as The Flash" go the way 
ol the extinct dodo bird, and for a new generation of Man of Steel 
advocates there s the current hit "Lois and Clark." 

Now Fox enters the fray with "M.A.N.T.I.S. " - which is an acronym 
for Mechanically Augmented Neuro Transmitter Interception System. 
SL5 MW ,f ara C 5 } ^ m % as Parapelegic bio-physicist Dr.Miles 
ESSf ' ^Vffteftte above device (in the form of a really wild 
SS^ g tK XO ' Skel f ° nl Whlch ^ Mlri t0 waIk again, it also provides 
SS ™ s "P erh "man strength and speed. Add a matching helemt 
S^SSS? a P«3 m S™ an tia. stun darts that render thei? victims 
SSfriif ^T! °n^i Bnd you have me tttie character. Hawkins 
rSte^SiS A N u± S i med h ? his lab assistant, and old friend, 
Cutter, portrayed by british actor Roger Rees. 

Am^S 61 " UT T !f 1S ^ to^g^g concept. That he's African- 
wS ThS^5f a f^ n £?*■,.**«• ^d Lumbly is really engaging as 
SrtTSSS? Dari ™ an "creator-director Sam Ratal and-TBiti&n- 

SStoSZn&tSKs^ f e co r pt f r ld be the 

Rut it iL-+ tt i ma *® ll & ™ s the best new show of the season, 
betted -ttes vrL^^^l^*™ 1 ^ 3 come U P ^th something 

SPSrtta*fl?SS:- *?- A - N - T - I ' S -" n eeds the benefit of new scripts 
SK,Sf S to f ^stain a healthy run on televison. The 
nSs SemnSL 7 f ,° m overwo ^ed cliches - like crazed ex- 
^econd eSl Steal nude ^ warheads (which was the plot of 

tteSSS^f"^ ES *&** well -P™duced but never- 
sidertagthenoSSl fora y ^o the action /adventure genre. Can- : 
be a real sh^l " SUC ° eSS *"* have brewln g here, that would 




'. , - */** ■.'■ > 






c 

9* 
at 

w 

£ 

. i 
\<n 

e 

id. 
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la. 



Peter Frampton, the ever 
resilient, tasteful guitar- 
ist-performer, [is] by far 
the best of the 1970s rock- 
ers to restart their careers 
in the 1990s. 



a shame 
Lennon and 
Marriott are 
no longer 
with us! 
"Imagine" 
what could 
have been? 

From the 
opening, 
"Some- 
things Hap- ■ " ■ "" 
pening," to 

the encore, "Do You Feel Like We* 
Do?" Frampton excelled,, it was 
one of the finest Frampton shows 
I've ever seen. I've seen Frampton 
play with and without Humble Pie 
throughout his many solo-band 
configurations since 1975. I wit- 
nessed the tour that produced, to 
this day, the largest selling double- 
live album to date — this concert 
was its equal. Frampton is a mul- 
tidimensional performer whose 
concerts are always similar, and 
yet different. 

Besides playing his crowd- 



pleasing 
well known 
tunes, he 
played some 
GEMS from 
some of his 
1 e s s e r 
known re- 
leases — 
"Breaking 
All The 
■ Rules" and 
"When All 
The Pieces Fit," as well as "Day In 
The Sun," from his newest release 
titled "Peter Frampton" on Relativ- 
ity records. 

For solos, he played a tele- 
caster, first time I've seen him play 
one, but when it came down to the 
meat and potatoes of the show, he 
strapped on a black Les Paul, and 
that's when he started to cook. The 
classic Frampton —jazz riffs, blues, 
ballads, rockers, and acoustic. 
Steve Rossi added a great sax solo 
for good measure. 




R: Todd Nichols, Randy Guss, Dean Dinning, Glen Phillips 

Is it music, or is that static on mj radio? 



By CHRIS HARRIS 
FAV Correspondent 

"Toad the Wet Sprocket" - 
'Dulcinea' (Columbia) 

"Toad the Wet Sprocket," a 
band name that can't be forgotten 
(from a Monty Python skit), deliv- 
ers an impressive effort on, this, 
their fourth album. The band's lyr- 
ics are intelligible and combined 
with a soft tempo, — you can truly 
appreciate the instruments. Al- 
though much of the music sounds 
similar throughout the CD, the 
band dazzles the listener on "Fly 
From Heaven," "Fall Down" and 



"Woodburning," with great vocals 
by Glen Phillips on Crowing. For 
comparisons sake, the band could 
be lumped with the "Gin Blossoms" 
and "Counting Crows," but 
"Dulcinea" deserves its own place. 
Emotionally, "Toad the Wet 
Sprocket" has a lot to offer. Their 
lyrics deal with real issues - help- 
ing friends in tough times, death of 
family members, and, of course, 
•love. 

"Dulcinea" is a honest effort 
worth listening to from a bunch of 
lads who sing and play from the 
heart. Rating: B+ 



Wrtwr wff ^ rafT ' ,r 7i f innf* w,wy,1B 'i ' ■nmummiwi ii mm 



September 21, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 9 



FEATURE? 

-m*L the Beachcomber @bmsJF 




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"To be or not to be...' 

Professor Dan O'Connell dresses as a colonial statesman. 

Profewtr [l>Hiu] C) Oii)Ff]]i([t<Wlil ttm fewe 



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X'liifi^nili^i' l^(l])!llilI|K'ii:-SiiMi(H!l|) 






lit; KAMJRA LAFAYETTE 
ViiaJJ Reporter 

Assistant Professor of Political Science, Daniel O'Connell, is on a 
It'inporary leave-oi-absence to join the Kettering Foundation's visiting 
professor program for the 1994-95 academic term. The Foundation,' 
located in Dayton, Ohio, is a research institute that, amongolher things, 
develops strategies to involve the public in politics. 

O'Connell says that when people think of politics, they tend to think 
of politicians. 

"People have a view of politics that keeps them out of the system," he 
said. Issues such as crime, schools, and health care have everyone 
concerned, but most voters "feel powerless when it comes to getting 
involved." 

The Foundation provides materials and forums to better inform 
voters about the political process. And because of his extensive political 
experience and his familiarity with some of the Foundation materials, 
O'Connell was asked by Foundation President, David Mathews, to join 
the foundation for a year. 

O'Connell is working with colleges and universities, especially 
community colleges, to strengthen a network of teachers and universi- 
ties, and to teach the use of forums to better understand politics and its 
function in our democracy. O'Connell believes that a politically in- 
formed citizenry begins with the schools and even churches. He de- 
scribes politics as "society or groups of people coming together to solve 
public problems." Also, O'Connell is working on what he calls, 'The 
Legal Project." It involves developing ways for lawyers to work hand-in- 
hand with citizens to improve some of the serious problems they face. 
He is aware of the fact that most people think of lawyers in a negative 
way. "But," he says, "the Bar Association and many lawyers really do 
care." 

O'Connell is not new to politics, he has an extensive and Impressive 
background. A lawyer, O'Connell was special counsel to former Gover- 
nor, now U.S. Senator, Bob Graham. 

Using materials from the Foundation, O'Connell encourages stu- 
dents to take "a more positive and healthy view of politics," and he tries 
to convince them to care enough about politics to get involved. Teaching 
at PBCC since 1 989, O'Connell received a 'Teacher of Excellence" award 
in 1992. 

O'Connell says he has been actively involved in politics all of his life. 
And after returning to Florida, he plans on being "much more active in 
Palm Beach County and South Florida in convening forums to deal with 
serious public issues." While O'Connell loves politics, he prefers to stay 
in the background and is not running for any public office. 

Filling in for O'Connell during his absence from PBCC is Mrs. Shari 
Lyes. Lyes, a PBC native, comes to us from the Edward M. Eissey (North) 
campus where she teaches journalism. 

Lyes received her education in political science and public admin- 
istration from Georgetown College in Washington, DC. Working five- 
years for the U.S. Government, she then became a reporter for the Cable 
News Network (CNN) in Washington, and from CNN to political reporter 
and editor for the Palm Beach Post 

"I had the opportunity to view the government and politics from both 
sides: as a government worker and as a member of the press," said Lyes. 

While at Central Campus, Lyes is teaching political science and 
government courses. Her goal is for her students to "gain practical 
applications of these studies, how it is relevant to our everyday lives." 
She stresses that students need to share what they know; everyone can 
learn from each other. She likes to talk about her experiences and 



Preparation and determination is 
key to successfully completing 
MAT 1024 Basic Algebra 



MATH\ 

from front page 

sense of pride 
and accom- 
plishment 
when you 
successfully 
complete 
MAT1024 in 
December. 

At this 
early date in Fall Term, however, 
perhaps you aren't even sure what 
MAT1024 Basic Algebra is. This col- 
lege preparatory course is required 
for any student who places below a 
certain cutoff score on a college 
placement test (ACT 0-16, SAT 0- 
:U>, CPIO (VA). The objectives taught 
in MATICKM ;ue I he ha-.ic I'omida- 



The state of Florida has set a 
limit of three attempts to suc- 
cessfully complete MAT1024 
BasicAlgebra. 



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.it Palm Beach C'.omniiniiiy 0)lk'f.>e 
.should be to satisfy any prepara- 
tory requirements, whirl) may mean 
adjusting school and work sched-; 
ules and commitments to provide 
adequate study time for the course. 
You will be spending six hours each 
week with your classroom instruc- 
tor in a lecture and lab situation. 
MAT1024 instructors spend time not 
only lecturing and working ex- 
amples at the chalkboard but also 
working with individuals and small 
groups as they work on examples, 
homework assignments, drill and 
practice sheets, and practice re- 
view tests. In addition to the six 
classroom hours, most students 
find that spending three to five hours 
in the CPI math lab each week is 
necessary to successfully complete 
MAT1024 Basic Algebra. These stu- 
dents also allow one to two hours 
for algebra homework each night 
during the week. 

The MAT1024 learning experi- 
ence merely begins In the class- 
room, for the CPI math and com- 
puter labs offer a variety of resources 
to enable you to prepare for each 
chapter test. The math lab, located 
in CP200 on the second story of the 
CPI building, offers one-on-one 
instruction on a walk-in basis and 
also by appointment. If the doors of 
the math lab are open, an instruc- 
tor is available to answer home- 
work questions, clarify lecture 
notes, or suggest additional prac- 
tice strategies. Every MATI024 stu- 
dent is entitled to the free half-hour 
tutor sessions which can be ar- 
ranged by calling 439-8048. Stu- 
dents can also attend one or more of 
the six Review Seminar sessions 
held weekly in CP20 1 . Review Semi- 
nars are held every Monday at 
5:30PM, Tuesdays at 7;30AM, 
1:30PM, and 5:30PM, and Wednes- 
days at 7:30AM and 1:30PM. The 
sessions last about one hour and 
cover the objectives for the upcom- 
ing chapter test in an informal, small 
study group. 

In the CPI computer lab, you 
can prepare for upcoming tests by 



of soft- 
ware writ- 
ten spe- 
cifically to 
accom- 
pany the 
course 
textbook, 
Elemen- 
tary Alqebra with Basic Mathemat- 
ics, Algebra software from educa- 
tional companies and interactive 
videos are also available in the 
computer lab. Many MAT1024 
students find that, computer drill 
and practice provides them with a 
different perspective on a problem 
and offers an opportunity to repeat 
a lesson several limes wit hou i (line 
constraints. 

As an iVIATiO*".*-:! Basic. Algebra 
siudenL yon will waul, to lake ad- 
vantage a! Wrrbvi-A ;'orn>. oi'Mqx.wt 
Palm Beat'!? 'Jopinimiity ('.'eiilc:.',e 

osiers ■■ its people. Advisory and 

counselory are Ira .inert lolielp you 
choose the best route toward your 
desired degree, and they should be 
consulted when you have any ques- 
tion about scheduling preparatory 
classes and pairing Ihemwith other 
courses! IiVstoCtdr^arid tutors i'ii 
the CPI labs are familiar with all 
aspects of the BasicAlgebra course 
and are dedicated to helping you 
complete the course successfully. 
In MAT1024, you can have the best 
of both worlds — a lecture instruc- 
tor in the classroom and a tutor in 
the lab. 

Successful completion of 
MAT1024 Basic Algebra requires 
your determination and willing- 
ness to spend time and energy, but 
you can count on a variety of re- 
sources and support services to 
support your goal. Be sure to take 
advantage of everything this pre- 
paratory course has to offer! For 
more information about MAT1024, 
call 439-8048 or visit the CPI math 
lab in CP200. The math lab is open 
Monday through Thursday from 
7:30AM to 3:30PM and from 
5:00PM to 9:15PM. Hours on Fri- 
days are 7:30AM to 2:00PM. 



W 
B 
B 
K 
L 
Y 

C 
O 

N 
T 
B 
S 
T 



Belch ftt Loud 

Belch It Proud 

Let it all out! 




1-900-776-5504 



$1 .35 per minute, calls average 

three minutes and cost $4.00. 

Updated every Monday at 9 a.m. 

MUST BE OVER 18 
Touch-tone phones 

tblfh llni- 1\n n MfY7l 71R WRRI 



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A 
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D 

N 

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A 

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i.iiiiiiiiiMi'i'ii iii nmiin i «~ «'« i "-im iiii ii i iiMi iii ' 1 111111 i m i i ni"ii iimm in'iiii'iiin I1UIIH1 



■ I'lllllllll I III* 



September 21 , 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 11 



Page 10 



the BEACHCOMBER September 21 , 1 994 



QPORTS! 

L HI the Beachcomber ^_U 



Scott Pospichal, mens basketball coach, readies his team for season 



i 



By SHIREEN MOHAN 
Staff Reporter 

Last year's incredible record of 26-4 is no 
help to this year's mens basketball team. Tough 
practices and tough games lie ahead. 

"If the team can survive through the months 
of November arid December, I'll be surprised," 
said coach Scott Pospichal. Part of a champion- 
ship team at Florida Southern College, Pospichal 
strives to be the best in Florida each year. 

Pospichal began his twelve-year coaching 
career at the University of North Carolina, in 
Charlotte, where he spent two years. He then 
returned to his hometown of Boscobel, Wiscon- 
sin, to coach at Auburndale High School for one 
year. His team lost the championship game. 
Shortly after Auburndale's brush with a state 
championship, Pospichal accepted a head 
coaching job at Polk Community College. 

At PCC, Pospichal led his team to the state 
tournament in 1987. After the tournament, 
Palm Beach Community College athletic direc- 
tor, Hamid Faquire, offered Pospichal a job, and 
the rest is PBCC history. 

Almost eight years later, Pospichal attributes 
his success ultimately to the players. 

"It has always been up to the players," said 
Pospichal, "{because] they have to have a hard- 
working attitude." 

Four of the team's best players graduated 
last year to further their education on basket- 
ball scholarships. Tyshon Fisher transferred to 
Central Oklahoma State University; Roskie 
Jackson is at Bethune-Cookman College; and 



■■ ■ ;-- ;.. -;■■".; .-•■.. .^^-vrH 



.,*V"* 









.4 



Pospichal attributes his sue 
cess ultimately to the players. \ 

"It has always been up to the 
players," said Pospichal, "[be- 
cause] they have to have a hard- 
working attitude*" 




A true sky-walker... 

Returning player Alex Kuehl is 7 feet plus, 



Devon Green went to the University of Cenlr, 
Florida. His brother, Bernard Green, lias (it; 
cided to stay here and receive his diploma 
There are four more players, Alex Kuehl, I'rtv 
Pollard, Markquis Wright, and Kelvin 
McClendon, a transfer student from the Uni 
versity of South Carolina, who are expected I 
have a great season. 

It's too early to determine where the team* 
strengths and weaknesses lay. Practice begin 
October 1, so Coach Pospichal hasn't had; 
chance to see any of his new players in arilon 

The first scheduled game is within a tour; 
nament at Miami-Dade/North Community Cd ; 
lege. Pospichal is not underestimating any tcnm[ 
knowing that each opponent can be dangerous] 
Yet, he is not ruling out the possibility ti 
making it to the State Championships again 
But it's a long way to March. 

Pospichal feels that PBCC fields a greai 
team each year. "I really feel that we put ouis 
good product, and if more students got belli™ 
us, they would encourage us to achieve." 



Now Leasin g 

Panther Park Apartments 

for students or faculty 




iPilMlliiiSKl 

llMiiiiiiiiRi 



from 

Palm Beach Community College 
Central Campus 
Lake Worth 




UNDER NEW 
MANAGEMENT 
CALL 582-9100 



j^Don'tforge!^ 
student &f^puliy rebates. 
^a]l,{lte^ffic^fe 



Sandra Booker's Lady Panthers, 
veterans of the state championships last 
year, prepare for upcoming season 

By LADY PARKER 
Staff Reporter 

This years girls basketball team "looks great," says Coach Sandra 
Booker. Although there are many freshmen on the team, Booker believes 
that the Panthers will not only win the Southern Conference but will also 
go to the state tournament. 

The Panthers have recently recruited some transfers from Division I 
schools. Booker seems to think that Latasha McMillan from Cocoa, will 
be a great new addition to the team. Another transfer, Jesse Yesenia, from 
the University of Florida, is also one of this years star prospects. 

One of the Panthers great returning starters, Brigette Gittens. will 
take the place of the "magnificent Deborah Williams." Deborah now plays 
for Lincoln University, a Division II school in Missouri 

Booker's foremost lesson for her player's this year is as always 
defense. As in years past, the defense has been one of the primary 
reason s for the team s success. 

cs™ t?^ S i tWO u t ° U | h I St rivals *™ M iami-Dade/North and Miami-Dade/ 

frZ ^ ha f ^ h m 1 her players tadiv idually and as a team. Coming 

£Sh2? Lj r0feSSl0nal coach - th e Panthers are bound to have yet 
another great season. 



Technical Tutoring Services 

-^^ll^iPi^^ Full Potential 



Children and Adults 
Individuals or Groups 
_ All Grades All l guoie 

Specializing in Math. Computers^Physica. Sciences 

Ross Cannin, M.S. 
(407) 743-9346 



SUPER BLUE GREEN 

"Energy for Life" 



TM 



] 



Experience increased vitlity, stamina & clarity 
En^rnesand Acidophilus ProdU 



Gotta "knows" 
for news? 



the Beachcomber has open- 
ings for reporters, production 
help, ad composition, cartoon- 
ists, photographers, office 
help Etcetera ...! 





call — 439-8064 
for details!! 



PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE 

Division of Continuing Studios 

4200 Conoroao Avanuo, Lake Worth, PL 33461-4796 

(4CJ7J 439-8006 



p=n 



prasmnts 



Breaking Into Television and 

ft/I o vie Making 

in South Florida 



c_£Ujxafl_Entaa 

Tuesdays, Ootobor 25, IMovambar 1, 8, IS, 22, 1994 
7:00 - 9:00 p.m. 

This caurao will tnko you through the production of motion pictures end 
television films dlecuaalng all the Jobs, crafts, talents, and steps In making 
a film end how you oan fit In the production of motion picture or 
tcrlavleton film. There will bo guest speakers well-vemad In the different 
phases of production- Each Job In the production of motion pictures and 
television films will be explained In detail. S&a and hoar how tho 
Information aitparhfffhway has ooma to tafavislon antf mavta making. 



Course ID #: SPO 0063-130 
Location: CE 121 



Ref. tt B243 
Fee; £22.60 Florida Resident 



Joseph Salzburg, Close Instructor 




PBGC'S LITERARY JOURNAL 

IS AVAILABLE 

AT THE FOLLOWING 

LOCATIONS: 



COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE CPI 100; HUMANI- 
TIES OFFICE; LIBRARY 3RD FLOOR CIRCULA- 
TION; DR. CAROLYN MARTIN'S OFFICE BA 
308; PAUL GLYNN BUILDING; SAC LOUNGE; 
CAMPUS BOOKSTORE AND ALL 
PBCC CAMPUSES! 



APOtlO'$ iUTE IS' NOW AC- 
CEPTING SUBMISSIONS FOR ITS 
1994-95 EDITION 



— CONTACT DR. CARO- 
... - ■, .- LYN MARTIN AT MAIL 
;S;;,-^:iJ STATION 47 FOR FURTHER 
vfM&*% INFORMATION OR CALL 
^^« 439-8137. 




BLACK STUDENT UNION 
Better known as B.S.U. 



Black Student Union is a 
club on the move and 
making a difference in the 
community. 

Come join in the fun, 
As we prepare for the 
new school year. 

Take a step in the right 
direction and get involved 
with B.S.U. 

Organizational Meeting; 



■ Where: SS 104 

■ When: Wednesday, August 31/1994 
a Time: 1:30 p.m. 




Dahmus Tutoring Service 

(407) 368-6452 

Accounting, Math 
Statistics, Economics 

Experienced teacher 
Sue Dahmus, PhD, MBA, MA (Econ) 



IIFREE ROOM & BOARD!! 

in exchange for assisting PBCC 
Central Campus student Mike 
Mahoney. Mike has very limited use 
of his arms and legs due to Cerebal 
Palsy. Mike is an independant guy 
with a lot of spirit who needs some 
help in the morning & at night. 
This is an ideal situation for a 
nursing student or physical therapy 
student who would like to augment 
their classroom study with practical 
experience. And you would be help- 
ing to free Mike from institutional 
"living." If you have the time, and 
the heart, please contact Mike 
Manhoney at 689-0386 after 5 
p.m. and leave a message. Or call 
his voice mail at 371-2157 - — or 
call MedPlex at 478-9900. 









CRC 


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^iH^Hi^^^K 



DUNCAN THEATRE — 
SEPTEMBER 29: 

St. Petersburg Ballet — 

With Prima Ballerina Galina Mezentseva 

Tickets: $15, $20 and $25. Phone 439-8141 for more information. 

PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE 

(CENTRAL CAMPUS) — 

Through September 29 In the Humanities Gallery: PBCC Faculty 
Show. Also, through September 30 In the Harold C. Manor Library 
second floor gallery: "Hispanic Heritage Month" features mixed media 
works by Carlos Valcarcel and Vivian Wolloh through September 30. 
Also, "Creative Images in Color and Black & White" by photographer 
Gary Kornheiser Qn the first floor lobby. Hours: 7 a.m.-lO p.m. Mon- 
days through Thursdays, 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Fridays and 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 
Saturdays. Free admission. Phone 439-8114. 

PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE 
MUSEUM OF ART — 601 LAKE AVENUE, LAKE WORTH 
Opening Saturday, September 17 through November 6: 
'The Banner Project," features an exhibition focused on 
large-scale banner format works of art. Open noon-5 p.m. 
Monday through Friday. Admission: $2. For more informa- 
tion, phone 582-0006. 



B 5?BSHMSa&ji ' i i i ' ii in iiiii ii w wasMa aBiaw 



Page 1 2 the BEACHCOMBER September 21 , 1 994 



COMICS 

^^tomr the Beachcomber ^*mJf 



STRANGE 



•BiDiliiiiii^ 




STAR TREK - The X-Generation 
Boldy Going Wherever 



THEME CROSSWORD 



D2 



By Robert Zimmerman 



JjifcJMl-tf ±K k.-*rw£i uJ 



ACROSS 


3B Canaveral 


66 Marines 


102 "— 17' 


1 Competent 


launching 


69 Cut back 


104 Rail under- 


S Sailors 
9 Fido's hand 


41 Language 
customs 


72 Suspect's 
defense 


pinnings 
107 Trial 


1 2 Tacked on 


• 46 Gold In Peru 


74 Son ol Isaac 


108 Swindles 


17 Fast and — 


47 Designer 


75 "Gashouso 


111 -de Janeiro 


19 "A Death In tho 


Cassini 


Gang" pitcher 


112 Draw with acid 


Family" author 


48 Long cut 


79 N.J. cagers 


114 Wing flap 
117 "JFK" director 


51 Luftwaffe 


81 Javanosolroe 


22 Took the wheel 


bomber 


84 Mr. Burrows 


1 1 9 Roman cuirass 


23 Whirlwinds: 


52 Foursome 


85 Corn carrier 


123 Disney creation 


2wds. 


56 Prosporo's 


86 Author Christie 


125 Waste lime 


25 1QB7lllm 


sen/ant 


88 Keep out 


127 Sign up 




58 Body armor 


90 Networks 


128 Sewing case 

129 And others 


27 Achieve 


58 Sufficient 


92 French farewell 


28 Joyce Carol -~ 


60 Roil: 2 wds. 


94 Egghead: 


1 30 Actress JaniR 


30 Hone 


62 Chinese 


2 wds. 


131 Delia or Mason 


31 Pekoe and cha 


doctrine 


96 Actor Flynn 


132 Shade giver 


33 Urgo 


63 0pp.ofSSW 

64 — Minor 


98 Planet 


133 Beach leature 


34 Corn gruel 


100 Frog 


134 Racing rounds 


35 — the joint 


65 Greok loltors 


101 Max — Sydow 




DOWN 


36 Kitchen 


71 Gettysburg 


106 Actress 




invitation 


victor 


Granville 


1 TV's Hawkeye 


37 Destinalion for 


73 Necklace pioce 


107 Servitude 


2 Scrap 


leftovers 


75 Coolldgo's VP 


1Q9 Prospector's 


3 "— Horizon" 


39 Typo size 


76 "Escales" 


quest 


A Gill to heirs 


40 Ado 


composer 


1 1 Rockne of 


5 Hebrew letter 


42 Money machine 


77 Striped 


Notre Dame 


6 Exchange 


43 Galapagos 


crosswalk 


113 Secret 


pro mi urn 
7 Track ovcnls 


deposits 


78 Caruso 


language 


44 Gelling wilh 


specially 


IJ4 Topnolch 


H Part of a sonnet 


effort: with "out" 


80 Author Nevil 


1 1 5 Pert, to 


9 Seod holders 


45 Merchant's 


82 — and beyond 


1 1 6 Vientiane's 


10 Pierre's Iri end 


performance 


83 Reconnalsanco 


country 


1 1 Most dire 


47 Energy 


satellite 


117 Take off the 


1 2 Street number 


Secretary 


86 Assembly line 


cream 


13 Fall 


49 Location 


product 


118 Enthusiasm 


14 Drop oil 


50 Throw 


87 Dwelling 


120 Fraeulein's 


1 5 Level 


53 Strategy for 51 


88 Lease 


name 


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91 Mr. Ilurok 


121 Snip oil 


1B Miss Adams 


54 Mythical giant 


93 Makes a 


122 Yesses 


21 Roman emperor 


55 Ol a time 


boo-boo 


123 German 


24 Make possible 


57 Clark's 


95 At the end 


article 


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companion 


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61 Employing 


99 Robert Wagner 


1 26 Lawyer's 


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ANSWERS 
ON PAGE 11 





(Still think smoking is cool? 
Turn to page six for the conse- 
quences to yourself and others by 
inhaling smoke into your lungs. 



fCorida Community CoCCege 
(Press Jissociation 



1993 BEST DESIGN 

THIRD PLACE/STATE OF FLORIDA 



'Ed Wood,' director Tim Burton's 
film of the late, transvestite film- 
maker is reviewed by D.S.Ullery 
on page eight. 



Volume 55 Number 2 PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE * LAKE WORTH, FLORIDA 



Changes in the student government 
constitution effect voters and candidates 

Central Campus SGA presidential elections to be held November 14-23. And 
candidates' applications must be filed no later than November 8. 



By STACEY SKINNER 
News Editor 

Read my lips... 

Listen up everyone. Student 
Government Association (SGA) elec- 
tions are slowly creeping up on us. 
That's right. It's almost that time of 
year when we, the student body, 
must decide who will lead us into 
the 1995 school year. 

But your vote won't get you what 
it did in years past. 

"Student Government elections 



will be held differently this year," 
says SGA secretary Jennifer Lang- 
ston. Instead of voting for the presi- 
dent and vice president, secretary 
and treasurer, only the presidential 
candidates will run. Once a presi- 
dent is voted in, he or she will ap- 
point his or her Executive Board (E- 
Board) . Says Langston, "The changes 
in election policy are the only 
changes I know of to the (SGA) Con- 
stitution." 

Presidential hopefuls must ap- 



ply by Nov.! 8. Campaigning is held 
Nov. 14-23, and elections follow two 
weeks later on Nov. 28, 29 and 30. 

So where are the challengers to 
incumbent Ken Marion? 

Langston says, "People put 
things offuntil the last minute," and 
she adds, "I wish hundreds and 
hundreds of people would apply 
before the [Nov. 8J deadline. I know 
that's exaggerating, but it would be 
good for Ken [Marion) to have some 
competition." 



? 



Ceremony or Circus! 

Florida Community College Press Association's 
1994 Awards Banquet made a mockery of 
journalism students' hard work. 



By STACEY SKINNER 
and MfiKEMITSEFF 

When you hear the phrase 
"award ceremony" what image 
usually comes to mind? Prob- 
ably the Academy Awards which 
are held once a year to honor film 
makers, actors/actresses and 
others in the business. However, 
had you attended the Florida 
Community College Press Asso- 
ciation (FCCPA) awards banquet 
and fall convention in Tallahas- 
see you would have witnessed a 
circus instead. 

In the Fall each year the 
FCCPA mounts its annual con- 
vention where seminars and 
workshops are held for budding 
journalists. At conventions end, 
an awards banquet, is held to 
recognize the work of students 
who toil on student newspapers 
and magazines throughout the 
year. The banquet and conven- 
tion is an opportunity for schools 
to compare their work and dis- 
cover where they need improve- 
ment. It's also a chance to meet 
new people, and to see whose 
work is the best. 

Last, year the Beachcomber 
won four awards in four catego- 
ries. This year it repeated in only 
one category — editor in chief 
Mike Mitseff won "Best Arts Re- 
view/newspapers," an award won 
last year by former Beachcomber 
writer George P. Reis. Also last 
year, the award banquet was run 
professionally. But not this year. 

According to Pamela Page- 
Bellis, advisor of the Wooden 
Horse, the student newspaper at 
St. Petersburg Community Col- 



lege, "It was probably the largest 
single disappointment I have ex- 
perienced, and I have been to nine 
of these [banquets]. We were ex- 
tremely disappointed in the pre- 
sentation and lack of organiza- 
tion." 

The ceremony itself appeared 
to be "thrown together." And the 
last minute candidate for Master 
of Ceremonies, Dr. Arthur 
Sanderson, occasionally forgot the 
category he was announcing and, 
says editor of the Wooden Horse 
Juliana Roberts, "He didn't know 
what he was doing." Two of the 
awards were misplaced during the 
ceremony and the winners were 
called to the podium one on top of 
another, with no chance for pho- 
tos of congratulations. 

In response, Valerie White, 
first-year president of the FCCPA, 
had this to say. 

"Our executive secretary was 
terminated and did not leave any 
information about the ceremony 
behind. As a result it did not go as 
well as we expected." A tad under- 
stated? No apology? 

When asked about the job Dr. 
Sanderson performed, White re- 
sponded by saying that he did an 
excellent job, acting as he did, as 
a last minute replacement. But 
Jerry Elam, president of the 
FCCPA the two years prior to 
White, said that this was the most 
disorganized banquet ever held. 
And he added that the forty min- 
utes of confusion sorting, out the 
certificates and awards -.after- din--.. 
ner was outrageous! 'They had all 



Mansoor Khan and Judy Barnes 

in 

PBCG Players' 

love By the Bolt' 

See page 5 



rafc" STUEHSWT VOICE ©F PBCC 



October 26, 1 994 




Central 
Campus 
student clubs 
are dependent 
upon Interclub 
Council 

Funding for club 
necessities and 
activities is not 
automatic. 



By STACEY SKINNER 
News Editor 

Until last year, student clubs 
on PBCC's Central Campus had 
fixed budgets, and money to use 
as they pleased within certain 
constraints. 

But things change. 

Last year, Brian Kenney, 
former president of student gov- 
ernment, cut all club budgets in 
order to increase attendance at 
his newly- formed Interclub Coun- 
cil (ICC). When clubs need money, 
they are now required to attend 
ICC meetings where they must 
present written proposals which 
are then voted on by all ICC mem- 
bers before a dime is doled out.„ 

In section 240.35 of the State 
Community College Program 
Fund it states: 

The student activity and ser- 
vice fees shall be paid into a stu- 
dent activity service fund at the 
community college and shall be 
expended for lawful purposes to 
benefit the student body in gen- 
eral. 

In plain english, a portion of 
the fees we pay when we register 

See ICC page 3 



m^^S§^^^S^^^^^^S, 



By CINDI NEWMAN 
Staff Reporter 

The room is loud and 
boisterous. The atmo- 
sphere is a somewhat ster- 
ile and institutional con- 
glomeration of tables, 
booths, chairs and door- 
ways. The energy and 
noise in the cafeteria is 
either comforting or fright- 
ening depending on how 
you look at it. It is not 
however, conducive to eat- 
ing a relaxed meal. The cafeteria is 
more apt to be looked upon as a 
place to eat while studying furi- 




ously for the test you must take in 
See CAFE page 3 



i ffnwr i TirwpyfriiKy'ffii ' fli ' ii ' fi imw,i'u\ i \ii t \ > \\ i m i i i l i i , i ■"■"■ i n 



Page 2 



the BEACHCOMBER October 26, 1 994 



October 26, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 3 



T7DITORIAJ 

.iff gg the Beachcomber MLmgiJr 



Dissecting the Halloween 
schlock — er, shock-fest. 

What are the crucial elements to a really spooky, 
scary horror flick you ask? Read on. 



Ah, yes, Halloween is almost 
upon us. That spectral, chilling 
eve of ghouls, ghosts, and things 
that are not content with merely 

, going "bump" in 
the night, but 
rather with mak- 
ing a go at some 
vital part of your 
inner anatomy. 

Ever since the 
arrival of films 
such as "Friday 
the 13th" and "A Nightmare on 
Elm Street" on video, it has been a 
tradition for young people to rent a 
number of horror films and spend 
the entire night scaring the living 
daylights out of themselves and 

„ their friends. 

Usually, the films they choose 
turn out to be slasher movies. So I 
figured that it was time to take a 
peek at the crucial elements that 
comprise the backbone of a really 
good stalker flick. If you are plan- 
ning a trip to the horror aisle of 
your local video store, it is essen- 
tial that you- ascertain that the 
movies you choose have these in- 
gredients. Otherwise, you're being 
shortchanged. 

1) NO PLOT, If the film actually 
has a thought provoking, intelli- 
gent storyline, or if it attempts to 
engage you with real characters 
and situations that are frightening 
because they're plausible, you 
don't have a slasher movie. 

2) A MASKED VILLAIN UN- 
MASKED. It's a rule. For a tried 
and true slasher flick, there can be 
only one type of villain - the 
unstoppable, returns-from-the- 
dead-no-matter-if-you-turn-him- 
into-Spam-with-the-Cuisinart 



is so hideously 
you will not see 



de- 
his 



OPINION 



D.S. ULLERY 



baddie who 
formed that 

face until the last five minutes of 

the movie. (This is also necessary 

for determining 

when the film is 

about to end.) 

3) SHE 

SAYS 'NO* BUT 
MEANS 'YES' 
SCENE. A given. 
As a joke, the boy 
is using his knowl- 
edge of a local ghost stoiy to scare 
his girlfriend. He mysteriously van- 
ishes. Naked, with a sheet strate- 
gically covering her exploitable bits , 
she calls out "Jimmy? Are you 
there? If you don't cut it out, I'm 
out of here!!" Thus the threat of 
denied sex hangs in the balance. 
Does it work? Never. He scares the 
bejeesus out of her and she fakes 
anger, smiles, then sleeps with him 
anyway. Then the out comes the 
villain. Usually with a harpoon. 

4) THE "FLAT CHEST" RULE. 
In any real slasher flick, the woman 
with the least assets above her 
waist will be the survivor. Count 
on it. Usually (but not always) this 
applies to the woman who dresses 
like a bad Cyndi Lauper wannabe 
as well. 

5) CRAZY BOB. OR JIM. OR 
FRANK... In an honest- to-goodness 
stalk and slash vehicle, a group of 
innocent teenagers will always en- 
counter a poorly dressed, grizzled 
sociopath who spends roughly 
twenty minutes of the film mutter- 
ing repeatedly " You're doomed. 
You're all gonna die!!" He of course 
gets it iirst, probably as he stops to 
lean against a tree and drink some 
whiskey from his flask. 



Editor/Layout. 

Associate Editor 

News Editor 

Entertainmenl 

Editor 

Advertising Manager 



the BEACHCOMBER 



— 1993 — 

Florida Community College Press Association 

Award Winners 

— George P. fteis — 

First place Best Arts Review & 

Second place In-depth Reporting. 

— Robert G. Gerard — 
Third place Sports Photo. 

— the Beachcomber — 
Third place Design/Layout. 



Mike MItscff 
Jim Stravina 

Stacey Skinner 
D.S. Ullery 

Judlc Casavanl, 



Contributing Reporters/Photographers 

Cindl Newman. Lady Parker, D.S Ullery, Art. Kennedy, 

Loura Lafayette, Chris Harris, Robert Wimberly, Tom Maniolls, 

Shlrcen Mohan, and Althea Stokes (Cartoonist). 

Opinions expressed in the Beachcomber do not necessarily reflect 
the views of the Beachcomber or Palm Beach Community College, 
letters to the Editor must be signed. 



Palm Beach Community College 

BEACHCOMBER 

4200 Congress Avenue 

Lake Worth, FL 33461-4796 

(407) 439-8064 Fax (407) 439-8210 





Dr. Edward M, Eisscy 
President/Publisher 



Ms. Vieki Seheurer 
Faculty Adviser ■ 



6) FLIGHT FROM LOGIC. An- 
other trademark moment, as com- 
mon as the "She says no.." scene. 
The girl has seen her boyfriend die. 
The killer now sets his sights on 
her. She shrieks and runs out of 
the house. Once outside, she sees 
to her right a car that she could 
probably drive, and to her left a 
dark, foreboding path leading into 
the heart of the woods. Naturally, 
she takes the path. 

7) THE OPEN-ENDED PHE- 
NOMENON. Being children of the 
late seventies and early eighties, 
we are accustomed to sequels and 
therefore do not cope well with pat, 
conclusive finales. Therefore, 
slasher movies require that oft re- 
peated cinematic moment where 
A) the hand of the supposedly dead 
maniac twitches ominously, B) the 
shadow of the supposedly dead 
maniac looms ominously in the 
background, leading to the rev- 
elation that 'Herr Psychopath' has 
in fact vanished (FOR NOW...}, or 
C) The flat-chested survivor is 



revealed to be well on her way to 
actually becoming the suppos- 
edly dead maniac. 

Keep your eyes open for these 
telling signs, and you can rest 
assured that you have selected 
the proper viewing material for 
your Halloween evening. 

As for me, I'm off to my new 
job now. There's this summer 
camp that, as I understand It, 
seems to keep losing their coun- 
selors... 




^^%t^? 





D 


tHE PBCC 


FOUNDATION IS 


ft 


SELLING RAFFLE 


TICKETS FOR A 


I 


1995 JAGUAR XJ6 


■Hi 


aLL PROCEEDS 


V 


WILL BENEFIT 




SCHOLARSHIPS AT 


J& 


PBCC. JUST900 




TICKETS WILL BE 




SOLD FOR $100 


A 


EACH. tHE CAR IS 


VALUED AT 




$52,000. tHE 




WINNING TICKET 


W 


WILL BE 


PULLED ON 


1 


DECEMBER 3, 1994 




AT THE BREAKERS, 




WINNER NEED NOT 


D 


BE PRESENT. 




IF YOU WANT 


O 


TO TRY TO 


N 


WIN THIS 


FABULOUS CAR, 


E 


PLEASE CALL 




439-8072. 





Certificates awarded to second and third place looked like 
they came from a junior high school graphics class 



AWARDS from front page 

afternoon to do that," said an ex- 
asperated Elam. But in defense of 
Sanderson, Elam said, "If he 
[Sanderson] hadn't agreed to help 
out at the last minute, we wouldn't 
have had a contest at all." 

Sanderson was not the only 
judge of the students work, but he 
was the coordinator — he filled in 
for an absent executive secretary 
according to White. 

Unfortunately, none of this 
matters now. The ceremony, says 



Page-Bellis, "Was poorly handled, 
orchestrated, and organized. To 
walk away with the top award (the 
Wooden Horse took top honors, 
the General Excellence Award) and 
have no good memories is a disap- 
pointment." 

Another area of disappointment 
were the cheezy certificates 
awarded for second and third place 
winners. They were so bad that 
most winners would be ashamed 
to show them to anyone. And the 
plaques awarded for first place are 
just as cheap and they never iden- 



tify the winner by name or school. 
It's just a generic, bland piece of 
stained wood with some polished 
brass-looking plates with the 
award named and nothing more. 
Here at Palm Beach Community 
College, the student clubs, pick 
any one, honor their members with 
plaques that outshine anything the 
FCCPA has ever come up with. 

The award ceremony is fin- 
ished, the winners have taken 
home their prizes and the losers 
have discovered where they need 
to improve. The memories, though 



unpleasant, will always linger. 
Sadly, most of us won't be back 
next year, we are moving on to a 
university or a job. So our last 
convention and awards banquet is 
nothing more than a sour taste in 
our mouth. 

The biggest regret for Page- 
Bellis though, is that "We try to 
teach our kids professionalism, but 
how can we ask for professional- 
ism from them when we don't 
present professionalism our- 
selves." 



The cafeteria may not 
be the Ritz-Carlton, 
but it is convenient and 
relatively cheap 

CAFE from front page 

10 minutes, or a place to joke around and talk 
with classmates after the test. 

The idea of a meal in the cafeteria is usually 
because you are starving to death and got up 
too late to eat at home, not because you were 
looking for a gourmet meal. No one expects the 
food in the cafeteria to be great, just edible and 
cheap. Sometimes you may be pleasantly sur- 
prised at the quality, and at other times you may 
feed most of your meal to the garbage can, it 
depends on your choices. I'd like to help you 
make some good ones. 

Breakfast food is a good value, if you skip 
the lead-weight pancakes. I've had all of the 
morning meals and found them passable to 
tasty. The home fries are on again, off again, it 
depends on how many baked potatoes they had 
left over from yesterday. When they run out of 
dried-out day-old bakers they use canned pota- 
toes which are much better. Your best bet would 
be to just order the two eggs and toast for 99* 
— you'll be safe, happy and full. 

When it comes to lunch entrees, they are 
"try at your own risk." I've had Ziti with sauce 
and cheese that was very good, and meat and 
cheese lasagna that was very bad! The soup is 
homemade, tasty and inexpensive at 99*. Patty 



melts (hamburger, cheese, onions on grilled rye 
bread) are a bargain at $1.25 — fries are 55* more. 
You can't lose with the chili. It comes out of a can, 
but topped with a few raw onions it is quite good, 
filling, and will hold you over for the rest of the day. 

The salad bar is overpriced at one trip for $2.49. 
If it "was all-you-can-eat" that would be another 
stoiy. As far as snacks go, bring them from home. A 
59* banana or apple is a rip off, as is a non-brand 
bag of potato chips. These things won't spoil in your 
book bag.. Buy them at the grocery store and let them 
commute. As far as soft drinks go, (if you must have 
them) , a medium drink adds close to a dollar to your 
bill, and there are no free refills! Drink water! (The 
fountain is located in the first dining room by the 
cash registers.) 

The service... what service you may ask? Well, 
behind the kitchen's ordering window you will usu- 
ally find "Winnie," a 13-year PBCC veteran, who 
adds a ray of sunshine to the room. She is genuinely 
concerned about the students and employees with 
whom she deals, and will be happy to make anything 
you order as low-calorie and fat-free as possible, 
just ask. 

We also have to re- 
member the cashiers, 
kitchen and clean up 
crew. Did you ever no- 
tice how neat and clean 
the rooms are? Some- 
one has to do it, and 
you know that we who 
eat there are all basi- 
cally slobs. 

While, overall, the 
food leaves something 
to be desired, the price 
and the staff make the 
cafeteria worth a visit. 
And besides, WHERE 
ELSE ARE WE GONNA 
EAT? 



"FREE ROOM & BOARD!! 

in exchange for assisting PBCC Central Campus 
student Mike Mahoney. Mike has very limited 

use of his arms and legs due to Cerebal Palsy. 

Mike is an independant guy with a lot of spirit 

who needs some help in the morning & at night. 

This is an ideal situation for a nursing student 
or physical therapy student who would like to 
augment their classroom study with practical 
experience. And you would be helping to free 

Mike from institutional "living." 

If you have the time, and the heart, please 

contact Mike Manhoney at 689-0386 after 5 

p.m. and leave a message. Or call his voice mail 

at 371-2157 — or call MedPlex at 478-9900. 




WH-IATI5 ALL THIS? 



Delta Phi Omega 

Sign up today ! 



Join the frat guys and sorority sisters for 

Pledging, Rush Week, Road Trips, and 

Parties! 



CALL THE DELTA HOUSE AT 585-3664 OR DROP 
BY AT PANTHER PARK APARTMENT #20 



Now Leasing 



Panther Park Apartments 

for students or faculty 




CLAss;is;oNm|j 

3 MINUTES ,AWM 



Palm Beach Community College 
Central Campus from 
Lake Worth 




UNDER NEW 
MANAGEMENT 
CALL 582-9100 



Caijl the office for details! 



u*d i m*, 1 1 TTWH as ra awaeiwe 



Page 4 



the BEACHCOMBER October 26, 1 994 



October 26, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 5 



News 

I W the Beachcomber L W 



Student Government organizes Club Fair 1994 



6ehtral Cambus Meetiiies 



Annual Fall Fair allows clubs greater 
visibility and recruit new members. 

By JAMES STRAVINO 
Associate Editor 

The Student Government Association (SGA) in con- 
junction with many of the clubs and organizations on 
PBCC's Central Campus recently held "Club Fair 1994." 
The two-day event's purpose, according to SGA president 
Ken Marion, is to acquaint new and returning students to 
campus clubs. And by joining one or two, students may 
expand their college experience beyond the classroom 
through club projects and activities. 

The Fair is organized by the SGA under the direction of 
the Interclub Council (ICC). The ICC, instituted last year, 
acts as a go-between for the clubs and student government, 
and it is where all clubs must come to apply for funding. 
Although fun, food, and entertainment were available, 
signing-up new members was the primary concern. 

One of the major events during the two-day lest is the 
cookout. Each club representive gave one food ticket to each 
person who visited their booth, and five tickets bought a 
meal. 

Marion has been student government president since 
Jan. 1993, and, so far, he is running unopposed in upcom- 
ing election held in November. Student government meets 
every Tuesday at 2:30 pm in the Student Activity Center 
(SAC lounge), and students are encouraged to attend and 
let their representatives know how they feel about the 
various issues that could effect them. Also, with elections 
coming up next month, students who would like to partici- 
pate in student government or apply to run for office should 
attend the meetings now. Deadline for candidate applica- 
tions is November 8. 

Also represented at the fair was the Black Student 
Union (BSU); Delta Epsilon Chi (DECA) business club; Phi 
Theta Kappa (PTK) honor society; Data Process Manage- ■ 



ment Association(DPMA) computer club; the Early Child- 
hood Club (ECC); Delta Phi Omega fraternity/sorority 
clubs(DPO); and the PBCC Players drama club. For those 
who did not have the opportunity to visit the Fair or who 
missed visiting some of the booths, a little information 
about them might be helpful. 

The BSU was organized in the late 1960s to promote 
an African-American awareness on campus through cul- 
tural events. BSU sponsors a number of these events every 
year, and they encourage students to join with them 
regardless of cultural background. Interested? Contact 
Ms. Gwen Ferguson at 439-8327. 

DECA, the business club, is a national organization 
open to all students, regardless of major, with interests in 
marketing, advertising management, salesmanship, fi- 
nance and credit, also, merchandising, fashion, and man- 
agement. The club is active statewide and nationally. 
Contact Sue Thompson in BA 103 or call 439-8124 for 
more information. 

FfK is the community college honor society with 
branches throughout the United States. In order to join, 
you must have completed twelve semester hours and have 
a grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.2. Once a member, 
a GPAofB.Ois required to maintain membership. Forthose 
who qualify, this organization offers the chance to partici- 
pate in many activities which promote leadership, fellow- 
ship and scholarship. Members who are active in the club 
also become eligible for scholarships. Also, offered to 
members, is a free, tutoring program. For those who want 
to help without necessarily becoming a member, look for 
and support the bake sales that PTK sponsors every 
Tuesday and Wednesday in the Business Administration 
(BA) patio. Contact Alien Hamlin at 439-8124 for more 
information. 

DPMA, (lie computer club, is for those who are in- 
trigued by computers. DPMA is the oldest club in the U.S. 
and the fourth largest on Central Campus. Also, the club 
sponsors field trips to area businesses. DPMA meets the 



Air-filled Castle is a big hit with the 
kids at SGA's Family Day picnic 




Warning.. .Kids, never do this after eating Bar-B-Q! 

Eleven-year-old acrobat Jason Miller show the adults how to really 

enjoy a picnic. 



By CGVDI NEWMAN 
Staff Reporter 

Oct. 8, 1994 marked what is 
hoped will become a new tradition 
at PBCC — Family Day. It was re- 
freshing to watch a bunch of fami- 
lies and friends come to gether for 
some good clean fun — dancing, 
singing, games arid sports, not to 
mention delicious Bar-B-Q. The pic- 
nic was held at Mound Circle Pavil- 
ion at John Prince Park adjacent to 
PBCC's Central Campus. 



The three dollar admission in- 
cluded all the food you could eat, 
participation in all the activities and 
a variety of music by a D J. The pinic 
was catered by the Company Picnic 
Company (CPC), and they served 
barbecue chicken and ribs, and old 
stand-bys hamburgers and hotdogs 
with plenty of macaroni salad, beans 
and desserts. The weather was 
sunny and clear allowing for a full 
afternoon of fun for both kids and 
adults. Unfortunately, only about 



sixty adults and children attended 
— Marion had planned for 500. 

The kids were treated to fun and 
games by a gamesmaster with the 
(CPC). There were sack races, tug-o- 
wars, and water-balloon fights. One 
of the most popular activities was a 
Bounce House, which all the chil- 
dren loved. 

As the day ended, the general 
consensus seemed to be thatitwould 
be great to do it again next year, and, 
perhaps, with more publicity the 
500 people Marion envisioned could 
become a reality. It was unfortunate 
that there were other events going 
on the same day that caused some 
families to miss the Family Day af- 
fair. 

On a positive note, the leftover 
food proved to be an unexpected 
meal for local homeless men and 
women who live in the park. 



'The idea is to bring 

together the students, 

faculty, staff and their 

families in a relaxed 

environment.' 

Ken Marion, SGA 

president. 



David Bludworth campaign needs volunteers 



j# 



By RICKASNANI 

Special to the Beachcomber 

This election year has many 
_ big state races that have been get- 
* ting a lot of attention due to the 
impact they will have on the future 
leadership of Florida. One impor- 
tant race this year is the Florida 
State Senate District 35 election. 



counties with a majority of it in 
Palm Beach county. David 
Bludworth.former State Attorney 
of Palm Beach county for 20 years, 
is the Republican nominee and 
candidate for this seat. 

The Bludworth campaign is 
offering students of Palm Beach 
Community College an opportu- 



by becoming volunteers. Cam- 
paigning offers students great ex- 
perience and lots of fun. The cam- 
paign is based out of West Palm 
Beach. All volunteers are given 
schedules of events, which they 
attend according to their own con- 
venience. For more information or 
to get involved with the campaign 



PBCC Players/Theatre Club 

meets every other Thursday at 
1 1:45 a.m. in the Duncan Theatre/ 
west entrance. Contact Mrs. Sunny 
Meyer at 437-8139 for more infor- 
mation. 

Inter Club Council flCCJ 

Meetings are held every Thursday at 
1:30 p.m. in the SAC LOUNGE, all 
students are invited to participate. 



Early Childhood Club meets the 
third Thursday of each month: 
Oct. 21, Nov. 4, Nov. 18, Dec. 9. 
from 12:15 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. in 
SC 1 13. Contact Sue Haines at. 
439-8046 or in SC 114. 

Students for Internation al 
Understanding (SIU) dub meets 
every Wednesday at 3:00 p.m. in 
the cafeteria. Contact Danlta Kurtz 
at 439-8233 for more information. 



The Computer Club/DPMA is 

interested in new members, they 
meet the third Saturday of each 
month at 10 a.m. For location, leave 
voice mail for Mary Kelly McWaters 
at 457-0352. 

Black Student Union (BSU) 

meets every Wednesday at 1:30 
in SS 104. Contact Mrs. Gwen 
Ferguson at 439-8327. 

College Republican Club hold s 
meetings in SS203 at 7 p.m. Call 
686-0970 for more information. 
CURRENTLY NOT MEETING. 



Student Government Associa- 
tion (SGA1 meets every Tuesday 
at 2:30 p.m. in the Student 
Activities Center (SAC), all 
students are encouraged to 
attend! Call 439-8228. 



Collegiate Music Educators Na- 
tional Conference (CMENC) meets 
every other Tuesday at 1:30 p.m. in 
Rm. 110 in Humanities Bldg.? For 
more info, call Bob Jones at 439-8 1 42 . 



Student Nurses Association 

(SNA) meets every Thursday 
from 1p.m. to 2 p.m. Contact. 
Easter Arora at 439-8362. 



Delta Omicron chapte r of Ph 1 
Theta Kapp a meets every other 
Sunday in Continuing Education 
(CE 121) at 7pm. Next meeting 
Oct. 2. New members welcome, 
for more information contact Mr. 
Hamlin in BA 1 10 or call 439- 
8229. 



Distributi ve Education Q liih 
o f America (DE CA) meets Tues., 
Wed. and Sundays. Dates were 
unavailable at press time. 

For more information please 
call Susan Thompson at. 64 1 -0345. 



St udent Re so urce Council 

( S RC ) meets every Thursday at 5 
p.m. in the cafeteria. CURRENTLY 
NOT MEETING. 



: IlVF0Ii]WilTittIV- : 



PBCC Players presents: 
'Love By the Bolt' 



ByD.S.ULLERY 
Entertainment Editor 

On Thursday, November 17, 
Sunny Meyer's adaptation of the 
Georges Feydeau play "Love By The 
Bolt" begins a three day run at the 
Watson B.Duncan theater. The final 
performance will be held on Nov. 20. 

Set in 1835, the play is a farce 
that relates the tale of a doctor who 
has an affair with one of his married 
patients. He tries to cover his tracks 
by explaining to his wife that he was 
up all night with a sick friend. Then 
who should arrive at their home but 
the friend, attempting to rent the 
doctor an apartment. He agrees, 
assuming that they will be able to 
meet there, but it turns out that her 
husband follows her to the would- 
be love nest, naturally, chaotic 



hijinks ensue. 

Feydeau is perhaps best known 
in America for his work "A Flea in 
Her Ear." His comedies have a repu- 
tation for being assembled like intri- 
cate jigsaw puzzles, with every ac- 
tion and line of dialogue being nec- 
essary for the final effect. 

"Love by the Bolt" opens Nov. 
17,18 & 19 at 8 p.m, and Saturday 
and Sunday, Nov. 19 & 20 at 2 p.m. 
Reserved seats are $10. Full time 
students, with a student ID, may 
purchase up to two reserved seats 
at $5 each. The box-office number is 
(407) 439-8141, call between noon 
and 5 p.m. The Watson.B Duncan III 
Theater is located at 4200 Congress 
Ave., Lake Worth (exit 47 off 1-95, 
then west 1 mile). 



Money is the lure that keeps the ICC going; 
the clubs must attend to get funded 



ICC from front page 

go into the student activity fund. 
ICC was formed to mediate the 
disbursement of this fund. 

Recently, it was voted to cancel 
all club budgets. Because of this, 
clubs now depend fully on the ICC 
for any amount of money they need . 
This is designed to increase atten- 
dance at meetings and increase 
cooperation between clubs. 

Says Kenney, "I agree with no 
budgets for clubs,. as long as they 
have money coming to them." 

When a club needs money, they 

cannot simply walk into an ICC 

meeting, ask for the necessary 

amount and expect to get it. In 

. fact, they won't get it. In order to 



make a request for money, the club 
in question must send a represen- 
tative to three consecutive ICC 
meetings. They must then fill out a 
proposal form indicating the 
amount of money needed and why. 
After the form is completed, an 
itemized budget and a list of all 
participants must be attached. 
Incomplete proposals will not be 
voted on. 

Sometimes a club proposal is 
rejected because the club has 
asked for more money than can be 
given. When this happens, it is up 
to the club to try and raise a por- 
tion of the projected amount and 
then submit another proposal, fol- 
lowing the same policy as before. 



Spooktacular 
Halloween Hop 

Presented by: 

The Greater Lake Worth Chamber of Commerce and Project 
Lake Worth Inc. in cooperation with the City of Lake Worth 

FRIDAY OCTOBEH2S 

8:OOP.M.TOMIDNE&HT 

AT THE LAKE WORTH 

CASINO BALLROOM 



'i"tt a 



featuring 

"Oldies 94.3 Traveling Party DJ" 

Also — 

Prizes for best costumes, 

a silent auction and refreshments. 

Tickets are $10 Prepaid 
and $15 at the Door 

and may be purchased at the Greater Lake Worth 

Chamber of Commerce — 582-4401 1702 Lake 

Worth Road or the Lake Worth Branch of 

Barnett Bank 

Proceeds to benefit Community Projects 



Upcoming Events 

Student Government (Central campus): 

Black-Tie Masquerade Ball 
Where: Omni Hotel, 

1601 Belvedere Road, 

West Palm Beach (across from the airport) 
When: Nov. 5 

Time: 8 p.m. — 1 a.m. and dinner at 9 p.m. 
Cost: $10 per person or $15 per couple. 
For more information contact SGA at 439-8228. 

Brain Bowl 

Where: Eissey Campus 

Time: Every Wednesday at 4:30 in AA 201. 

For more information call 625-2454. 

Men and Womens Basketball 

Where: Central Campus gym 

When: Men — Nov. 9 at 7:30 p.m. Ladies — Nov. 1 1 & 12 at 3:30 

p.m. and Nov. 13 at 1:00 p.m. 

Intramural Sports 

Contact Mr. Terrence Hopkinson at 439-8332 or dial 439-8227 for 
upcoming events. 

DPMA (Central Campus computer club) 

What: Computer Seminar "Advanced Windows 3.1" 

Where: BA 203 

When: Nov. 10 

Time: 6:30 p.m. 

Cost: $25 Regular Price, $15 for PBCC students and employees 

Contact Mrs. McWaters at 439- 8306 or 457-0352 (voice mail). 

BSU [Black Student Union] 
What: Soul Food Fest 
Where: SAC Lounge 
Time: 11:00 a.m - 2:00 p.m. 



Chicago City Limits 

Where: PBCC Eissey-Campus Theatre 

When: 8:00 p.m. 

Cost: Tickets are $18 and $15 

For more information call 625-2345 




fisiqj Cmp «s 'Di/of « 



PBCC Northstage presents a 

Black Comedy 

Where: Eissey. Campus Theatre 

When: Nov. 10-20 

Call 625-2345, noon to 5:00 p.m. for 

more information. 



Comedy Performance 
Where: PBCC Glades Campus 

1977 College Drive 

Belle Glade 
When: October 29 
Time: 8:00 p.m. 
Cost: Tickets are $15 
For further information call the box office at 992-6160 

Siggraph Award Winners (Computer Generated Art) 

Where: Harold C. Minor Library 1st floor(central campus) 
4200 Congress Ave. 
Lake Worth 
When: November 7 - 30 

Time: Monday - Thursday 7:30 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. 
Friday 7:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. 
Saturday 9:00 sum. - 4:00 p.m. 
Cost: Open to public. Free. 

Edward Droge. Oils. Indian Series. 

Where: Harold C Minor library 2nd floor (central campus) 

Time: Monday - Thursday 7:30 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. 

Friday 7:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. 

Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. 
Cost: Open to public. Free. 



Dahmus Tutoring Service 

(407) 368-6452 

Accounting, Math 
Statistics, Economics 

Experienced teacher 
Sue Dahmus, PhD, MBA, MA (Econ) 



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Page6 



the BEACHCOMBER October 26, 1994 



October 26, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 7 



Is smoking cigarettes hurting me or my loved ones? 

Emphatically, YES! 

Education to the dangers of inhaling cigarette smoke into healthy lungs is the 
key to detering more thinking adults from continuing this deadly habit. 



By EVELYN WALBRUM 
Staff Reporter 

One ordinary cigarette weighs 
practically nothing. A whole pack 
weighs only one ounce. The ques- 
tion begs to be asked. What do 
these cylinders of tobacco offer that 
makes people willing to die for it? 
The answer is pleasure. 
Smoking begins easily... 

The pattern of smoking starts 
innocently enough. First it's one 
cigarette, then two, then three. 
Pretty soon that person is smoking 
a whole pack or more per day. The 
smoker is now addicted. Addiction 
means dependency. Smoking is 
addictive because the cigarette 
contains nicotine, a psychoactive 
drug, which affects the brain as 
well as the nervous system. The 
addicted smoker must maintain a 
certain level of nicotine in the 
bloodstream. Contrary to popular 
belief, low tar cigarettes are not 
necessarily good, as the person 
will either smoke more cigarettes 
or inhale more deeply in order to 
maintain the level of nicotine their 
body craves. 

Nicotine present in smoke is 
deadly... 

Cigarette smokers who inhale 
bring most of the gases, tar and 
nicotine into their bodies and that 
is where it stays. The nicotine 
present in tobacco is so deadly 
that were you to put one drop of 
pure nicotine on your tongue, you 
would die in a few minutes. When 
a horse breaks its leg, nicotine is 
sometimes injected into the ani- 
mal instead of shooting it. ■ 
Heart works harder... 

What happens when nicotine 
gets into your system? The blood 
vessels constrict, especially those 
going to the extremities, and they 
remain so for about five minutes. 
As a result the blood is not able to 
bring nutrients in and remove tox- 
ins and wastes. The heart rate in- 
creases 10 to 20 beats and the 
blood pressure rises 10 to 20 de- 
grees. Adrenalin and fatty acids 
are released into the blood stream 
while the blood sugar rises. An- 
other result of the constriction of 



the capillaries and blood vessels is 
the wrinkling of facial skin. A 
chronic long time smoker looks 
ten years older than a nonsmoker. 
In addition, smoking can cause 
disease of the gums, premature 
balding, alteration in brain wave 
patterns and ulcers. The list is 
longer but I want to go on to some- 
thing else. 

Chemicals found in smoke is 
dangerous... 

We have all heard that smok- 
ing is unhealthy, but very little is 
said as to exactly why smoking is 
dangerous. I am going to try to 
describe the chemical actions and 
reactions. Please remember I am 
neither a doctor nor a chemist. 

The tobacco leaf contains 
a complex mixture of several 
hundred chemical compo- 
nents. About four thousand 
substances have been iden- 
tified in cigarette smoke. 
Many of these components 
are highly toxic, carcino- 
genic, mutagenic and anti- 
genic. 

An unfiltered cigarette 
produces five billion particles 
per cubic millimeter, which 
is fifty thousand times as 
much as can be found in 
polluted air. These particles 
when condensed form ciga- 
rette tar. Worse yet, cigarette 
smoke contains carbon mon- 
oxide in concentrations four 
hundred times greater than 
is considered safe in indus- 
trial areas. Smokers have two 
to four times as much car- 
bon monoxide in their blood 
as nonsmokers. Why the fuss 
about carbon monoxide? 
Carbon monoxide is harmful 
because it displaces oxygen 
in the red blood cells, thus 
denying the body of life giv- 
ing oxygen. When the blood 
molecules are loaded with 
carbon monoxide, as they are 
with smokers, the blood's 
ability to function properly is 
curtailed. 

In one year a typical one 
pack a day smoker takes in 



50 to 70,000 puffs, assaulting the 
mouth, throat, and respiratory 
tract, while the nose is bypassed. 
Deaths from heart and circu- 
latory disease is increased in 
smokers... 

The total amount of smoke in- 
haled is a key factor contributing 
to disease, the most serious being 
coronary heart disease and car- 
diovascular diseases. Deaths from 
these two diseases are most com- 
mon in people 40 to 50 years old. 
The age bracket is 20 years younger 
than for those who die from lung 
cancer caused by smoking. 

Researchers are finding out 
why. 

Smoking reduces the amount 



of high density lipoprotein , i he good 
cholesterol, and this promotes 
plaque formation and speeds hlond! 
clotting. Smoking increases ten- 
sion in the heart muscle walls ami 
speeds up the rate of musculiii 
contractions. When the work load 
of the heart increases its need far 
oxygen increases. Meanwhile cur 
bon monoxide has displaced the 
much needed oxygen. ..thus (be 
heart is strained. 
Lung cancer in smokers very 
common... 

Smoking has been IndleuUd 
as the primary cause of lung emi 
cer. The increase in lung cancer 
among women, parallels Ihc in 
crease in smoking among women 
This rise in lung cancer has mil 
been found for any other part of 
the body, and lung cancer now 
exceeds breast, cancer as the lead' 
ing cause of cancer deaths among 
women, 

Smoking can also cause can 
cer of the mouth, pharynx, cHuplw 



See SMOKING page? 



Cultural Calendar 



Quest Theatre & Institute — 

What: Production of "Lady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grille'* 

Where: Duncan Theatre (West) 

Tickets; $18 and $20 Phone: (407) 832-9328 Fax (407) 8354)234 

PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE 
(CENTRAL CAMPUS) — 

THE ICE AGE HITS PBCC 

On Monday November 14, there will be an Ice Carving demonstration, 
Dan Fontenot Culinary Instructor and Keith Loukinen, Chef Tounumt 
of The Breakers and the garde manger class at PBCC will be sculpting 
ice in front of the Business Administration Bldg. at the Central Cam.'" 
pus. This will take place at Monday at 10:00 a.m. on Nov. 14. 

PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE 

MUSEUM OF ART — 601 LAKE AVENUE, LAKE WORTH 

Opening Saturday, September 17 through November 6: 
'The Banner Project," features an exhibition focused on 
large-scale banner format works of art. Open noon-5 p.m. 
Monday through Friday. Admission: $2, For more informa- 
tion, phone 582-0006. 





COMMUNITY COLLEGE DAYS 
AT WALT DISNEY WORLD 

OCTOBER 21 - OCTOBER 30 



to^R Z^f PLUS $SM PARK ' NG - RHaU '- AR PR,CB ' S «"'"' "'"« $.1.00 PAKKINU. 
Pa° k OR^m! ° P K AD ri M ' S t ION: One-day p... ,„ the DUncy-MOM Studio* T.,,,ho 

under 18 years oi age must be accompanied by u parent to Pleasure Island.) 

TICK COLLE G I Z L r T ° AU - (AGE 3 & AB0VI » COMMUNITY 
COLLEGE EMPLOYEES AND STUDENTS; THEIR FAMILIES. 

FRIENDS, AND OTHER SUPPORTERS. 



Ardease Johnson 

439-8017 

Admin. Bldg. 

Esther Stewart 

439-8227 

Student Activities Center 



Purchase your tickets today by contacting: " 

I^^EJ {Mum} VOLADES] 



Winnie Kindig 
625-2416 
1st Floor 

Admin. Bldg. 



Norman McLcod 

367-4560 

3rd Floor 

Admin. Bldg. 



Theresa Mock 

992-615?. 
Cashier's Offit'e 



PAYMENT MUST BE MADE WITH CASH OR MONEY ORDER 
FINAL OATr m^ PA YABLE TO: PBCC/PACC 
PINAL DATE !0 PURCHASE TICKETS: FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1994 

C t%!imS : ™ c £ H(JMAN nesouncBs & your pbcc \ 

-^ffl^O^tfES^L^ N- Of COMMU NITY COLLBGBS^ 



Smoking is gaining converts 
among teenagers and 
women at an alarming rate 



SMOKING from page 6 

{jus, pancreas, bladder, kidney, 
cervix, and stomach and/or Ill- 
nesses such as emphysema and 
chronic, obstructive lung disease. 
Smoking also destroys the cilia 
which 1 are hairlike protrusions from 
the surface of the bronchial tube. 
'The. cilia protect us by moving 
mucus up to the mouth carrying 
foreign matter so that, we can ex- 
pectorate or swallow. 
A half million people die ev- 
ery year due to smoking... 

Here are a few statistics. In the 
U.S. alone, 500,000 people die ev- 
ery year clue to smoking. This num- 
ber is more than all the deaths 
caused by all the wars we fought In 
since this country has been formed. 
World-wide tobacco use causes 2 
million deaths per year. Also, for 
every minute a person smokes, 
they lose one day of life. 
For every cigarette smoked, 
you lose 6 1/2 minutes of life 
expectancy... 

Another statistic is that for ev- 
ery cigarette smoked, 5 1 /2 min- 
utes of life are lost, So for one pack 
which contains 20 cigarettes, 1 10 
minutes are lost., and for two packs 
220 minutes arc lost. That's al- 
most four hours! However, there's 
some good news on the horizon. 
Evidence suggests thai after a year 
without smoking, the risk of lung 
cancer decreases and after 1 years 
the Incidence of lung (dancer among 
ex-smokers approaches the inci- 
dence of nonsmokers. 
Smoking harms unborn 
child... 

What about the unborn child? 
Nicotine and oilier chemicals in- 
gested by the pregnant woman gets 
into the fetus' bloodstream. This 
can cause retardation in the baby's 
growl h rate and the baby will weigh 
almost one pound less at birth. 
These babies are most likely to be 
born prematurely, have lung dis- 
orders and after birth cancer or 
heart disease, there is a definite 
link between sudden infant; death 



syndrome and mother's smoking. 
If a woman uses birth control 
pills and smokes, the incidence 
of blood clotting increases. Smok- 
ing also interferes with assimila- 
tion of calcium. 

Second-hand smoke is also 
deadly... 

Second-hand smoke or side 
stream smoke enters the air from 
the burning end of the cigarette. 
Side stream smoke Is twice as much 
filled with tar and nicotine as main 
stream smoke. Side stream smoke 
has three times as much 
benzopytanc, which is a cancer 
causing agent, three times as much 
carbon monoxide and three times 
as much ammonia as main stream 
smoke. 

Non-smokers at risk from ex- 
haled smoke... 

Unfortunately, a non smoker 
gets a double whammy from the 
exhaled smoke and the side stream 
smoke. Carbon monoxide lingers 
in I he bloodstream five hours after 
exposure to smoke. Also, (here's 
an increased risk of cancer for 
women married to men who smoke. 
Babies and children breath faster 
than adults. Therefore they inhale 
more air and more pollutants. 
Smoking is a learned bad 
habit... 

Smoking is a learned behavior. 
Smokers become conditioned to 
use a cigarette. They think Ihey 
cannot function without It. In ex- 
treme cases an addict will light up 
(he minute he arises, in the bath- 
room, before eating, during break- 
fast, and certainly afterwards with 
coffee, There are certain situations 
that act as a trigger response for 
smoking; such as talking on the 
phone, watching TV, watching a 
horse race, waiting for someone, 
and driving. Lighting up becomes 
an automatic response and this is 
called secondary reinforcer. 
How does the addicted smoker 
quit? 

With all this knowledge about 
how dangerous smoking is, how 
does the addict stop this habit? 
First and foremost, the smoker 




must want to stop. There are all 
kinds of groups organized by hos- 
pitals and the American Cancer 
Society, the American Lung Asso- 
ciation, and the American Heart 
Association to help the smoker 
stop. Self help programs run by ex- 
smokers are helpful. There are also 
many books on the subject. 
Smoking: the single most pre- 
ventable cause of premature 
death... 

The fact is that smoking Is the 
most important single preventable 
cause of illness and premature 
death in North America and Eu- 
rope. Teenagers and young adults 
have a false sense of lndestructi- 



The Tenth Annual 

FOOD 

T^ATVTTLIES 




WPTV «8?fe 






Oct 10 -Nov. 22, 1994 



1-800-345-WPTV 

WPTV-TV S 

P.O. Box QIO 

Palm Boach, FL 33480 



bllity, which prevents them from 
giving up smoking. They must be 
taught that in fact they are very 
vulnerable and can be destroyed 
by illness due to smoking. 
Tobacco companies spend al- 
most 3 billion dollars to con- 
vince you to smoke every 
year... 

Believe it or not, tobacco com- 
panies spend 2.5 billion dollars on 
advertising and in return run up 
sales of 50 billion dollars. That's 
not a bad return. It is the conten- 
tion of the tobacco industry that 
adults have the right of free choice 
when it comes to smoking. Fur- 
ther, they claim that the evidence 
linking smoking to increased mor- 
tality and mobility is inconclusive. 

You've heard both sides, the 
choice is now yours. You have 
only one life. You can either live 
it or loose it. Please live it. 



Get Involved: 

Student 
Government 




SGA Elections 
November 28, 29 and 30 



Gotta "knows" 
for news? 



the Beachcomber has open- 
ings for reporters, production 
help, ad composition, cartoon- 
ists, photographers, office 
help Etcetera ...! 



call — 439-8064 
for details!! 




PBGC'S LITERARY JOURNAL 

IS AVAILABLE 

AT THE FOLLOWING 

LOCATIONS: 



COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE CPI 100; 

HUMANITIES OFFICE; LIBRARY 3RD 

FLOOR CIRCULATION; DR. CAROLYN 

MARTIN'S OFFICE BA 308; PAUL 

6LYNN BUILDING; SAC LOUNGE; 

CAMPUS BOOKSTORE AND ALL 

PBCC CAMPUSES! 



APOLLO'S LUTE 1$ now 

ACCEPTING SUBMISSIONS FOR 

ITS 

1994-95 EDITION 



CONTACT DR. CAROLYN 

MARTIN AT MAIL STATION 
#47 OR CALL 439-8137. 



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Page 8 



the BEACHCOMBER October 26, 1 994 



October 26, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 9 



ENTERTAINMENT 

JSLm^i ^e Beachcomber •■ 



Ed Wood': His life and the movies he made were stranger than fiction 



Filmaker Edward D. Wood Jr. has 
made some of the worst movies in 
history, but, in spite of them or 
because of them, they have gained 
him a place in history. 

By D.S.ULLERY 
Entertainment Editor 

Few filmmakers have achieved the notoriety 
that marked the career of Edward D. Wood Jr. This 
was a man who, at the age of thirty, began his quest 
to fulfill a personal vision — making movies. Wood 
was enraptured by the seductive lure that is 
Hollywood's trademark. In his defense it must be 
noted that his perseverance despite almost no 
financing (and a decisive lack of interest on the part 
of major film studios) is an inspiring example of what 
it means to go after your dream — no matter what. 

However, as anyone who has seen his films can 
testify, Wood lacked one crucial element to achieve 
true success as a producer/director in the 1950's 
— talent. He was, in simple terms, very, very good 
at being very, very awful. 

Now this generation is provided a glimpse into 
that magical era of starlets, phony monsters and 
ridiculous dialogue thanks to the talent of Tim 
Burton, director of "Ed Wood." This film tells Wood's 
story, the man who churned out "Plan 9 From Outer 
Space" — officially recognized as the 'Worst Film in 
History" — and it is also a loving homage to the 
maestro of mediocrity. 

The film itself is very simple. Ed Wood (Johnny 
Depp) decides that he wants to be the next Orson 
Welles and make some sort of cinematic opus. He 
chances to meet an aging, washed-up actor by the 
name of Bela Lugosi (Martin Landau) and they 
become fast friends. He has a big name star on his 
hands, and now has a draw for some backing. After 
a brief search, Wood finds a small, cheesy film studio 
and convinces the owner to let him make a film 
about transvestites. This is of keen interest to Wood, 
who was a cross-dresser himself. As he remarks at 
one point, "I like to dress in women's clothes be- 
cause it makes me comfortable." 

The film is made and released under the dubi- 
ous title of "Glen or Glenda?" and is based on a script 
Wood himself wrote in about three days. 

That's the ignition. The rest runs .like a well- 



oiled machine, with a great feel for the magic of 
Hollywood, as well as a keen insight into the horrors 
that befall those who have fallen from grace, as did 
Lugosi. In fact, the relationship between Lugosi and 
Wood is the cornerstone of the movie. There was 
something about making films with his favorite 
actor that kept Ed Wood going. The moments be- 
tween them are amusing, frightening (tills film pulls 
no punches in it's depiction of Lugosi's morphine 
addiction) and more than occasionally moving. As 
the dying star Landau is superb, capturing the 
essence of this once noble legend of the cinema. It 
was a strength of the film that Lugosi's death had 
such a powerful impact, although it occurs off- 
screen. 

Depp is phenomenal as Wood. Between these 
two actors there was indeed a real screen chemistry. 
It was wholly believable that they grew to be so close. 
So convincing were these performances, that not 
only will Martin Landau assuredly steal Best Sup- 
porting Actor, but I'm also no longer convinced that 
Tom Hanks has it in the bag for "Forrest Gump." 
Depp definitely earns comparison. 

The rest of the cast turns in a collection of off- 
the-wall performances that range from very good — 
such as Bill Murray in a small role as Bunny 
Breckinridge, the openly homosexual co-star and 
long-time friend of Ed Wood — to outstanding as in 
Sarah Jessica Parker's moving portrayal of Dolores 
Fuller — Wood's long-time girlfriend and star. Jeffrey 
Jones does a wonderfully campy turn as Criswell, 
the most inaccurate psychic in history. Patricia 
Arquette is enjoyable as Kathy, Wood's first wife, 
who accepted his odd fashion habits with a simple 
" fine." 

Burton handles the material with finesse. He 
was literally born to direct this film. Wood was 
obviously a tremendous influence on Burton's ca- 
reer, a fact that has shone through in several of his 
past projects, and is visible in this picture. 

But the real stars are the production crew. After 
a brilliant opening montage that pays tribute to the 
infamous f/x for which Wood was noted, we have 
none other than Criswell himself introduce the 
picture from his ever eternal vigil in a casket, 
declaring — as he so often did at the beginning of 
Wood's movies — that the following events are true, 
and they are "all based on sworn testimony!!" 

In the end, it is a sweet irony that this man who 
amazed everyone with the incredible lack of flair he 
possessed, was able to create films that are remem- 




Johnny Depp 



Photo by Suzanne Tanner 



Wood lacked one crucial ele- 
ment to achieve true success 
as a producer/director in the 
1950's — talent. He was, in 
simple terms, very, very good 
at being very, very awful. 



bered with more fondness and love than must 
studio-backed classics. Ed Wood took Grade* Z 
garbage, put it on the screen, and dared to believe 
that he had created a work of art. As he says at one 
poignant moment near the films conclusion, "Fills 
is it. This is the one I'll be remembered for." 

A great many people in the motion picture 
industry considered Ed Wood to be a man with no 
talent or future. They would have said that his 
remark was a deluded joke. 

But the real joke is on them. Of his films, "Plan 
9" was indeed the bottom of the barrel. As a result, 
when he made that statement while sitting in the 
balcony of that theater, Edward D. Wood Jr. was 
absolutely correct. 




John Mellencamp File photo 

MTV's Unplugged and a resurgence 
in the folk music category has turned 
the tide and made artists realize that 

less is sometimes more. 



the aesthetic listening 
value. Despite the soft 
sound, the lyrics are 
typical Mellencamp. He 
jokes, bitches, narrates 
and complains. On 
L.U.V., Mellencamp 
sings, "Preacher man, 
he keeps preachin' 
while he covets your 
wife." The single is one 
of many highlights of 
Dance Naked because 
of a catchy chorus, in- 
telligent lyrics and ad- 
dictive backing sound. 
Rating: A- 



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Mellencamp scores a hit with* "Dance Naked" 

By CHRIS HARRIS 
FAU Correspondent 
. John Mellencamp - "Dance Naked" (Mercury) 

On Dance Nalced, John Mellencamp has stripped for the listener. No, he hasn't removed his clothes, 
he's released a CD which was recorded with only the bare essentials: vocals, guitar and drums. Even 
the vocals are first or second takes. But does the final product work? 

By now, most listeners will have heard the first single titled Wild Night, which is a catchy song with 
a beautiful duet by Meshell NdegeOcello and Mellencamp. But the song is not a fair representation of 
the entire CD. Wild Night, compared to the rest of the CD, is overproduced and too poppy. The rest of 
the songs sound like they're from the heart — which is where Mellencamp is coming from. 

Once again, an artist has shown that technology is sometimes unnecessary. The 1980s were filled 
with overproduced albums that had been through the sound mixer too many times. MTVs Unplugged. 
and a resurgence in the folk music category has turned the tide and made artists realize that less is 
sometimes more. Despite pessimism from the public, there is hope for the music of the 1990s. 

An abundance of quality songs are packed on only nine tracks. Remarkably, none of them are 
disappointing. The first song on the record, Dance Naked, establishes the soft tempo mood for the CD, 
and Brothers continues 



FEATURED 

Jm>. the Beachcomber $L W 




a looA at J^JjCjG^s literary journal 



Dr. Carolyn Martin, guiding force behind PBCC's 
five-year -old literary journal, looks past recent 
obstacles and forward to the next 'Apollo's Lute.' 



By ROBERT WIMBERLY 
Stqff Reporter 

Jammed into an office only a 
little bigger than the trunk of a '65 
Caddy, six staff members of Apollo's 
Lute (AL) begin work on PBCC's 
literary journal. 

Dr. Carolyn Martin, faculty ad- 
visor for AL, is easily the most 
visible person In the room. Dressed 
in bright, colors, she radiates su- 
per-abundant energy, and, at the 
moment, she's juggling four con- 
versations, is having her brain 
picked by a pesky reporter, and Is 
still managing to stay on top of 
today's agenda without (amazingly) 
becoming irritable. 

"Apollo's Lute is the creative 
outlet tor the college," says Martin. 
"It's an opportunity for students to 
be exposed to culture and aesthet- 
ics on a personal level. Studying 
the historical works is important, 
but when you create your own 
[works], it directly improves your 
ability to express yourself and your 
level of perception." 

Martin and her staff are visibly 
pleased with the success of the 
journal, both in terms of the qual- 
ity of work they have been able to 
gather and for the journal's viabil- 
ity: 

"We've been doing this for five 
years now!" said Martin, "Can you 
believe it?" 

Some contributors to the jour- 
nal, on the other hand, are not as 
happy. 

Poet and writer Molly Grabill 
was furious that her poem, "Se- 
duction," had been printed incor- 
rectly — a word left out altered its 
apparent intent. Also, Regina 
Dilgen's work, "Elijah Touching My 
Face" was run without attribution. 
And Martha Leslie's drawing, "In- 
tertwined" was attributed to some- 
one else. 

But Martin says these were 
production errors, not judgement* 
calls. She is quick to assume re- 
sponsibility, to the point of specifi- 
cally asking that these errata be 
printed, along with an apology on 
behalf of the journal. 

"We felt terrible that these 
things happened, but we are not 

















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perfect. We all make mistakes," 
she says. But as far as the content 
of the material is concerned, she 
flatly states, "The journal does not 
edit." 

All of the staff members are 
creative: they're writers, musicians, 
photographers, or painters. They 
understand the importance of 
maintaining each artist's personal 
intent by not allowing the journal 
to interfere with the artist's meth- 
ods or become involved in polem- 
ics. Martin teaches creative writ- 
ing and has au thored a novel — A 
Tale of Two Tapestries. 

Unfortunately, the Gordian en- 
tanglements of artistic integrity are 
not limited to typos and assorted 
goofs. Last year, the journal nearly 
ran aground when their efforts to 
obtain funds from the Interclub 
Council (ICC) were delayed. The 
council felt they had a right to 
restrict "objectionable content." 

The ICC is presided over by the 
Student Government. They were 
also supposedly considering the 
removal of iCE , a now-defunct 
entertainment magazine, from the 
campus for similar reasons. The 
iCE dilemma resolved Itself when 
the owner of the publication — the 
Sun-Sentinel — discontinued it clue 
to pressure from the community at 
large. But AL is made of sterner 
stuff. Eventually the feud esca- 
lated until the school administra- 
tion intervened and "pointed out 
their error." 

Said Martin, "Dr. Eissey has 
assured us that 'PBCC does not 
censor.'" 

There is a tense pause in the 
air lor a few moments. Clearly, 
they do not care to discuss the 
issue any further, except to say 
that was then and this is now. The 
SGAhas been supportive and help- 
ful this year, the contributions are 
rolling in, and the only thing that 
matters now is putting the journal 
together. 

But there will always be little 
issues to resolve. For example, the 
Students for International Under- 
standing Club (SIU) was to share a 
billboard with AL, but they filled 
the entire space with an elaborate 
display before anyone { from f the 
journal could 
go down there. 
But Martin & 
Co. have little 




"There is nothing more competitive than the 
field that artists and writers face," Dr. Carolyn 
Martin says. "This is a great starting point for 
anyone who wants to be published." 



enthusiasm for political catfighting 
when there is no real threat to the 
journal. When this came up in the 
meeting, the notion of saying some- 
thing about it was quickly dis- 
carded in favor of arranging to use 
half of the board in front of the 
Center for Personalized Instruc- 
tion (CPI) lab. 

If you have an artistic bent, 
regardless of your major, AL en- 
courages submissions from any- 
one, in any media. 

'There is nothing more .com- 
petitive than the field that artists 
and writers face," Martin says. 
'This is a great starting point for 
anyone who wants to be pub- 
lished." 

Mail or drop off short fic- 
tion, poetry, slides of paintings, 
and color or black and white 



photography c/o Dr. Carolyn 
Martin #47, Communications 
Dept. Central Campus. 

Include your name and 
phone number and a SASE if 
you would like your submission 
to be returned. And if you are 
interested in obtaining a copy 
of Dr. Martin's novel, drop a 
note in the same box. 




CYNTHIA 
VOLUNTEER 

100 E. Boynion Beach 

Bovnton Beach. Florida 



BLUM. M.S.. LM.H.C. N.C.C. 

COORDINATOR TRAINING DIRECTOR 

Boukard (407)369-0711 

Fax (407) 369-2455 



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Dirk Itowr toi :■ '■ > PiiVM «'■ ■'■ ^ Ate0 CT :hl ' Cniri Coa? ' lnf ■ 



Belch it Loud 

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Let it all out! 



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Updated every Monday at 9 a.m. 

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TO i W TOrn t inBiww iH i'i'i'iiiiiiiiii i'i^iiii mi m > h mh > m i m 

Page 10 the BEACHCOMBER October 26, 1994 



October 26, 1994 



iff n*. H B.fli Jin, 1 1 1 1 il i jw'w w w ii. 1 1 1 r n awtnm* h h mui ilji.u. ■■ mia* w am i'i ] it 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 1 1 



CPORTQ 

A 1| J P tfie Beachcomber JL Jr 



Gero, in his sixth year as coach, produces Major League talent 



By.-SHEREEJV HOHAJV 
StqfifJReporter 

Although baseball season does 
not officially begin until February 
1, 1995, the PBCC Panthers and 
their five-year -veteran coach, Craig 
Gero, are looking forward to an- 



other season of Panther baseball. 
Gero's team has been practicing 
since school began in September. 
Though they finished third in the 
state last year, the Panthers have 
hard work ahead of them since some 
of their best players have gradu- 




Two former PBCC baseball players are now 
well known major leaguers. Forest Hill's Robby 
Thompson now plays for the San Francisco Gi- 
ants, and Jupiter's Dante Bichette is with the 
Colorado Rockies. 



File Photo 



Panthers Kevin Moran stands In against Indian River Community 
College during 1994 season. 



a ted. 

Gero played third base during 
his high school years at Forest I fill 
and college ball at PBCC and Florida 
Southern. This will be Gero's four- 
teenth year as a coach, eight in high 
school and he is in 'his sixth year at 
the college level. 

Of the four players lost from last 
season, Scott Sorenson, who gradu- 
ated from Forest Hill High School, is 
now a student at Jacksonville State 
University in Alabama. And Kenny 
Wagner transferred to Florida At- 
lantic University in Boca Raton. 
Signing major league contracts was 
Mark Brownson, who played base- 
ball for Wellington High School be- 
fore attending PBCC, he signed wit h 
the Colorado Rockies. And lastyear's 
shortstop, Juan Veras, has signed 
with the Texas Rangers, 

Many former PBCC baseball 
players have moved on to the pro- 
fessional level. Dave Manning, who 
attended Cardinal Newman High 
School, went on to the University of 



Central Florida, then transferred 
back to PBCC so thai he could play 
baseball. He pitched for llic Pan- 
I hers in the 199 1 -92 season, and lie 
eventually signed with the Texas 
Rangers. T.J. Sehenbeek, also from 
that season, signed with the Mil- 
waukee* Brewers. 

Two former PBCC' 1 >a.scbaU play- 
ers are now well known major leagu- 
ers. Forest Hill's Hobby Thompson 
now plays for the San Francisco 
Giants, and Jupiter's Haute Hlclidlc 
is with the Colorado Rockies. 

Since Major League I iasel Kill Ims 
been on strike since August 1 2, 1 lie 
Minor league players and [Mvi.stonI 
college teams have been i gel I lag a kit 
more recognition. 

Gero has strong feelings about 
(he strike. "I believe thai both the 
players and the coaches are at lUtill," 
he said. "If I had to make a choice, II 
would be on the players' side. I hid a 
Commissioner [of baseball] heenln 
place, 1 don't think this whole .si* 
would have happened," 



Miami Heat 

veterans and 
rookies open 
camp at PBCC 

By ART KENNEDY 
Staff Reporter 

For the sixth consecutive year 
the Miami Heat arrived at PBCC 
Oct. 6 for two-a-day practices. The 
Heat are coming off their most suc- 
cessful season: they won a fran- 
chise record 42 games. 

The team looked rusty in their 



first workouts, but the players 
seemed to be in good physical con- 
dition. The entire roster from the 
1993-94 season are returning, the 
only exception is former point guard 
Brian Shaw, who was lost to state 
rivals Orlando Magic. Miami's Coach, 
Kevin Loughery, expects first round 
draft pick Khalid Reeves to pick up 
the slack. 

Reeves is expected to battle 
Bimbo Coles for the starting point 
guard position left vacant by the 
departure of Shaw. 

The Heat's week of practice 
ended with an intersquad scrim- 
mage Oct. 11 at PBCC's Central 
Campus gym. The game was marred 
by selfish play according to coach 
Kevin Loughery. 



Practices held Tuesday* ^ 
and Thursday from* J. 4 * 
3:00 — 5:00 p.m. 
Saturday 10 — noon 



Men's and women's teams 





\> 



■v.^ 



Field ^dhsbuthside of 
PBCC^Wral Campus 
adjaceiit jtb £th avenue 

gi 



Open to all PBCC student 
faculty and staff 




Women's tennis team debuts 
at the Florida Regional Rolex 

Terrence Hopkinson, new tennis coach, takes over 
top-ranked women's tennis team here at PBCC. 

By ALMA DAMADZIC 
Stqjfjf Reporter 

The Florida Regional Rolex tennis tournament hosted the top Junior 
collegiate women players in Florida last week (October 7-9) at Broward 
Community College in Fort Lauderdale. It was the first tournament of the 
year for the Palm Beach Community College women's tennis team. It also 
served as the debut for new head tennis coach (women and men), 
Terrence Hopkinson. PBCC was represented by Amanda Hoffman and 
Alma Damadzic at the tournament. „. 

Amanda, a returnee to the Lady Panthers tennis team, played a long 
and close three-set match against Maya Magno from BCC before suc- 
cumbing to a 6-3,3-6,6-1 loss. Despite the loss, Amanda looks forward 
to a rematch. 

Alma, a Lady Panther freshman, won her first match by defeating 
Julie Pyburn from Florida Community College of Jacksonville 6-0 and 
6-1. In the quarterfinals, Alma won a hard fought match with Justine 
Vankleeck of BCC by scores of 6-4, 2-6, and 6-4. Alma came back after 
being down 4-1 in the third set to win the next five games. She lost in the 
semifinals to Kirsten Stewart of FCC J 7-5 and 6-1. 

Amanda and Alma also played doubles losing to Carlsson and 
Campbell after defeating Magno and Nakata of BCC 6-0 and 6- 1 All in all, 
it was a successful start for our Lady Panthers squad. The team looks 
forward to playing on their home courts with their own fans checrlni! 
them on. ' 




TYPING SERV.CE studI^^L 

5B6-5BDB 



One Quarter Later: A reveiw of the 1994 Dolphins 



By ART KENNEDY 
Stojf Reporter 

As the 1994 National football League sea- 
son approached many serious questions con- 
cerning the Miami Dolphins remained unan- 
swered. After racing to a 9-2 record, during the 
first three-fourths of the 1993 , the dolphins fell 
apart and finished 0-5 thereby missing the 
playoffs. 

The coming of the new year brought with it 
many questions. The health of Dan Marino after 
being lost to a season ending Achilles-tendon 
injury in only the fourth game of last season. 
The defense , which started last season statis- 
tically as on of the better in the league, but 
never recovered after season ending injuries to 
starters John Offerdahl, Troy Vincent, and Louis 
Oliver. The running game, would it be non- 
existent for another year. 

These questions and others were answered 
when the Dolphins met the New England Patri- 
ots in a muddy Joe Robbie Stadium , on Sep- 
tember 4th. Marino silenced critics , some 
calling for Hemic Kosar to start, by throwing for 
473 yards and five touchdowns. The Dolphins 
defense still has it problems with conerback 
Troy Vincent and Dwight Hollier injured. The 
unexpected retirement of Dolphins all-pro line- 
backer John Offerdahl left the defensive. unit 
with major questions. 

So after a quarter of the season , the 94 



Dolphins are beginning to take shape and sev- 
eral things are evident. For one, Dan Marino is 
still one of the best quarterbacks. Through the 
first four games he has completed 92 of 152 
passes for 1370 yards and a league-leading 12 
touchdowns. 

The Dolphins offense is very potent and 
leads the NFL at with 437. 5 yards /per game. An 
improved running attack has averaged 104,3 of 
those yards per game. But on the defensive side 
of the ball, the Dolphins still have many prob- 
lems to address. 
The Dolphins rank 
last in the league in 
pass defense, they 
give up 339.5 
yards/per game, 
and they are last in 
total defense giving 
up 414.0 total 
yards /per game. 
The pass rush also 
has produced only 
an average of two 
sacks a week, the 
one bright spot has 
been the rushing 
defense. The dol- 
phins still rank first 
in the AFC holding 
opposing offenses 



to 74.5 yards/per game rushing. 

Also, with injured starters Troy Vincent and 
Dwight Hollter set to return soon, the defense 
will be receiving a much needed lift. But this 
team still goes as Dan Marino goes. With Marino 
off to one of his best starts in years, a develop- 
ing running game, and an improving defense, 
the season looks promising. If the team re- 
mains healthy it should return to its familiar 
position — in the thick of the AFC playoffs. 



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to an 

Open House 

Sunday, November 6, 1994 
1:30 to 5:00 pm 

Question and Answer Sessions With 

The Deans and Faculty of 

The Colleges Of 

Osteopathic Medicine • Pharmacy 

Optometry • Allied Health (Physician Assistant 

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PLACE: Graaaacrat Batfl 

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Laka Wort!., Flarida 



Ca-ad, 4 aarian, if yon daa't «a»» a taam, 
Wa Will aaaija yea ta ana 



FALL TERM: Eirtry Wadaatday 4:25-6:15 

fraia (Malar 26 - Daeamfcar 7, 1994 



Laava Y.ar: Kama, Sacial Saoarity #, 
Addraaa, aad Pkana Namfcar ia Garea Farjaaaa'a 
aFfica (Paul Glynn Bldj, Raam #113) 
er With Ettaar Sratfarl ia SAC Laniiaa 

TiM.d.y, Octabar 25, 1994 4:00 »ia 

Warn a» 4:15 - 4:2S 

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Intramural Table Tennis 

"Ping Pong" 

An intramural 
Ping Pong Tournament is planned for this FALL 

Those interested in planning and/or playing in the 

Tournament and other intramural Ping Pong Activities 

should plan to the organizational meetings held in the SAC Lounge. 




OTTfrwrirW'fr'W""**^ ■ ■ ' ' ■ "■ '" 



nmr*iif*m\\m.,u 1 1, \iJii„-MV.m/JC9 



Page 12 the BEACHCOMBER October 26, 1994 




the Beachcomber 




BS3iiE!KKiE££HHi3SSTiKE;22 



STRANGE 



^lilliiiillii^ 




THEME CROSSWORD A MATTER OF PERSPECTIVE 



"By Trip Payne 

ACROSS 

1 Move a muscle 
5 Up to the job 
9 "Three Blind — " 
13Altendsasa 
visitor: 2wds. 

19 British 
composer 

20 Dratl drink 

21 Word after teen 

22 Beettiovarfs 
Third 

23 Start of an 
observation: 
<i wds. 

26 Dancer Castle 

27 Carponters' 
conlainers: 
2wd5. 

28 Low cart 

29 Nourished 

30 Ms. Alicia 

31 Hosieries 

32 Ember 

33 In favor of 

34 Came up short 



35 Hasn't the 
ability 

38 Catalogue 

39 Europoan 
capital 

41 Corrida cry 

42 Part 2 of 
observation: 
4 wds. 

48 Disconsolate 

50 Goes out 

51 Mayberryname 

52 Held up 

53 Fabulous 
fabulisl 

55 Aclress Lupino 

56 Fil of anger 

57 Bestow 

58 Kind of derby 
60 Joined 

securely 

62 Little drink 

63 "Six— RivVu" 

66 A Stooge 

67 Part 3 of 
observation 



68 Mr. Onassis 

69 Overhead rails 

70 Jelliod fish 

71 Sit-up locus 
74"... and — if 

you don't" 
77 Prettifies 
79 A little loco 
BO — Parseghian 
81 Step-closB- 

step-close 

dance 

85 Used a 
stopwatch 

86 Runny cheese 

87 Individual 
components 

B9 Spanish artist 
90Endoflhe 

observation: 

4 wds. 

94 Fellas 

95 Places where 
the action is 

96 Lei loose 

97 Southern 



seaport 
99 Cold-shoulder 

102 Marshy area 

103 Consumer 

104 Word on a 
Biblical wall 

105 Time of day, 
to poets 

106ThePofRPM 
107 Indonesian 

boat 

108 Day 

112 Invisible 

114 Speaker of Ihe 

observation: 

2 wds. 

116 Strainers 

117 Slant 

118 Capo in 
Portugal 

119 Ms. Thompson 

120 Tranquil 

121 Serpentine 
sound 

122Med,subj. 
1 23 Scrapo 



•63^^ 

1 Old sailor 

2 The Kingston — 

3 Data, far short 

4'Brina up a (ish: 

2 wds. 
5 Green liqueur 
., 6 Stirs rapidly 

7 "Shall we?™ 
response 

8 Foul up 

9 Resettle 

1 Epitome 

1 1 Buffalo Bill's 
name 

12Tarzan n star 

13 More than a few 

14 Made mad 

15 Craggy hill 

16 Biblical 
mountain 

17 Sacred images 

18 Grandmothers 



24 "That's old 
news": 2 wds. 

25 Loves to pieces 
2a Necessitate 

32 John Goodman, 
to Roseanne 

33 At an end 

34 Dixon's partner 

35 Song's end 

36 — ve*a 

37 Jennings" field 

38 Nastily 
derogatory 

39 Basketball goal. 
sometimes 

40 Unimportanl 
sorts 

43 Ostracized 

44 Trio ol trios 

45 Expunge 

46 "Wail — Dark" 

47 Chick sounds 
49 Posial Creed 

word 



54 Aromatic ball 

56 Terrilios 

57 Laura or Bruce 
59 High shots 

61 1969 Super 
Bowl MVP 

63 Cowboy rope 

64 Doclor or Intern 

65 Kind of replay 
67 Nut-bearing 

palm 

72 Actor Hugh — 

73 Principal pipos 

74 Gathering slorm 

75 Come up 

76 Beaver product 
78 Put in a new 

crew 

82 Actress Rogers 

83 Singer Jacques 

84 Top-oMhe-line 
86 "Bizarre" actor 
67 Imaginary 

88 To a degree 



91 Basketball 
fan's cry 

92 In a way: 
2 wds. 

93 Skaler Harding 

98 Paging device 

99 The Grinch's 
crealor 

100 Skater Sonja 

101 Racing's Al — 

103 Eurasian 
range 

104 Popular 
pilgrimage 
destination 

106 Hammer part 

107 Greek letters 
tOBUghlgas 

109 — mater 

110 Borders 

111 Piece of cake 

1 13 First lady? 

114 Partsofadol. 

115 Mr, Gershwin 



BOB THE ANCHORMAN 
LOSES HIS PENSION. 



By Althea Stokes 



The coroner of the 
Simpson case. 




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ANSWERS 
ON PAGE 9 




< » 



© 1 994 United Feature Syndicate 




"four tSorw, -we wova -thai -the 
■BolVwinj evidence he. Suppressed- 





DILBERT® by Scott Adams 



WEIL BE GETTING A 
NECJ "BUNGEE. BOSS" 
SOttETIrAE TODAY 




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HI-I'n-YOUR-NEU>-B055- 
LET'S-CHANGE-EVERY- 
TH1MG-BEF0RE-I-GET- 
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TOO-LATE.- GOODBYE. 

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HEUAS 
LIKE A 

■ttENTOR 
TO fAE. 



I THINK HE 
f\ADE A 
DIFFERENCE 



tW cor^ G! 




PAPERS DUE AND 
NOT ENOUGH TIME!! 



Call Gaybrilla Beaver for all 

your professional typing 

needs (MICROSOFT 

WORKS). Phone (407)478- 

7852 leave message. 



.(Candidates for Ration on 
I Dec. 20 at the Palm Beach Jai Alai 
1 Fronton, are listed on pages 6 & 7. 





the Beachcomber: 'How do you 
feel about the recent Republican 
victory over the Democrats?' 
Anwers and photos on page 9. 



ACHCOMBER 



Volume 55 Number 3 PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE ♦ LAKE WORTH, FLORIDA 



December 14, 1994 



Is Rob Morphew an 
anachronism or is he 
just misunderstood? 

Rob Morphew didn't fit the mold so when asked to 
comply or fly, he spread his wings. . . 



By ROBERT WIMBERLY 
Stqff Reporter 

For purposes of continuity this 
story began last year for Art Appre- 
ciation instructor, Rob Morphew. 
His likeness, elbows propped on a 
wooden dais and looking casual 
(ominously so for some who knew 
him), appeared on the front page of 
the Beachcomber's April 12, 1994 
issue. Alongside this picture ran a 
story describing both the class and 
the man: fiery, opinionated, de- 
manding, "akin to Robin Williams' 
character in The Dead Poet's Soci- 
ety," wrote the Beachcomber. "He 
engenders either inspiration or per- 
spiration in his pupils," the article 
continued. There was supposedly 
a small, resultant flurry to sign up 
for his class the following semes- 
ter, but when the students came to 



the first class, Morphew was gone. 

Morphew, who had put in 12 
years at PBCC, was told that the 
interior design program had been 
cancelled and no more hours were 
available for part timers (aka ad- 
juncts). It was simple, black and 
white, cause and effect. 

But in real life, when are things 
really that simple? 

Morphew is, he admits, a com- 
"plex man. "I'm sure that if you 
asked around you would find two 
radically different views of me," he 
confessed. One former student, 
Linda Wells, presented him with a 
life-size cake in the shape of 
Michaelangelo's "David." To 
Morphew's amusement his face 
graced the famous sculpture, and 

See MORPHEW/page 3 



PBCC helps West Palm 
Beach celebrate its 100th 

Delta Phi Omega, PBGC's new fraternity, is 
drafted to build float for centennial parade. 



Ben Jerome is on the back of a 
flat-bed truck heading down Con-' 
gress Avenue. He is holding onto a 
14- foot-tall wood and paint panther 
that is armed with a cake-knife. The 
panther is cutting a slice from an 
equally tall birthday cake. Horns 
honk, people point, and the winds 
whip away at Jerome's unwieldy 



cargo. Then he sees flashing lights 
and hears the sound of a police 
siren. The truck is pulled over to the 
side of the road, and after a stern 
talking-to by one of West Palm 
Beach's "finest," Jerome learns that 
it is illegal to ride on the back of a 
flat-bed truck holding onto a 14- 
foot-tall panther with a cake-knife 




We did it ■ Photo By Esther Stewart 

Ben and Matt Jerome lean against PBCC's entry for the city of West 



A MERRY CHRISTMAS FOR LOCAL FAMILIES 




HO, ho, ho... Photo By Mike Mitseff 

Members of Delta Omicron, PBCC's Central'Campus chapter of 
Phi Theta Kappa, wrap Christmas gifts for needy families at PBCC. 

Phi Theta Kappa members met recently to 
wrap gifts for their annual Adopt-a-Family 
project. With donations of money and toys 
from many local businesses, four families, 
including nine children, will have a much 
brighter Christmas this year. 

Either one or both parents of each family 
are students at the college. 

Each family will receive gifts and toys, a 
Christmas tree complete with all the trim- 
mings, and a Christmas dinner. 



on a busy street in West Palm Beach, 
even if you are on the way to that 
city's 100th birthday parade. Even if 
you are bringing the birthday cake. 
This is just one of many lessons in 
dealing with bureaucracy, Jerome, 
a PBCC freshman, will learn. 

The city of West Palm Beach 
celebrated its 100th birthday last 
month, and 
Palm Beach 
Community 
College par- 
ticipated by 
providing a 
float in the 
city's down- 
town centennial parade. Well actu- 
ally, what PBCC's administration 
did was volunteer to provide a float 
for the parade and to fund the build- 
ing of the float, but the project was 
completed by the school's newest 
fraternity, Delta Phi Omega. Well 
actually, what Delta Phi Omega did 
was volunteer to build the float, but 
the project was completed by the 
fraternity's vice president, Ben 
Jerome. Actually, Jerome never re- 
ally volunteered to build the float; 
he was not even present at the Inter- 
Club Council (ICC) meeting where it 
was decided he would be the school's 
official float-builder. Matt Jerome, 



Campus Spotlight 

By JOHN NICODEMO 



teered his brother to the task. That's 
where Ben's lesson in dealing with 
bureaucracy began. 

According to Jerome, PBCC ad- 
ministration was aware since last 
summer of the school's commitment 
to the city for the float, but word 
filtered down from the administra- 
tion, through the bureaucratic maze, 
to him, only 
four weeks be- 
fore the parade 
date. With so 
little time, 
Jerome real- 
ized he had to 
come up with a 
simple design that would be rela- 
tively easy to build. "I figured, since 
I'm going to their birthday party, 
instead of a present, I'll bring a 
birthday cake," said Jerome. He 
sketched out a simple design, which 
included a 14-foot high, four-layer 
cake being cut by the school's mas- 
cot symbol, a panther. Then he 
drafted an initial list of what was 
needed, including a flat-bed truck 
and driver, building and decorative 
materials, skilled helpers (carpen- 
ters and artists), and most impor- 
tantly, an indoor location large 



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Page 2 



the BEACHCOMBER December 1 4, 1 994 



December 14, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 3 



J7DITORIAT 

-JbL^ the Beachcomber JLf 



It's time to be movin' on 

By MIKE MTTSEFF 
Editor 

With publication of this issue of the Beachcomber, my tenure as editor 
will be over. And I wanted to say thank you to the many students and others 
who have joined with me to produce an award-winning community college 
newspaper. I understood from the beginning that running a college news- 
paper would be a challenge, but a challenge that I welcomed. 

But without the help of my fellow students who shared my passion for 
putting out a great student newspaper, none of this could have happened, 
it was definitely a team effort. My heart is full from the many wonderful 
people I have had the opportunity to work with here at PBCC; and, as a 
result, I have made many new friends! 

But it doesn't stop with the students, it just begins there. 

The counsel of Ms. Vicki Scheurer, the paper's faculty adviser, proved to 
be invaluable to me over and over again during my two-year assignment. She 
is an intelligent and caring person who always gave me accurate and helpful 
advice whenever I asked her for it — thank you Vicki! 

To all of the PBCC staff people who run the various departments, I say 
thank you for your kindness, interest and helpfulness as I struggled with 
paperwork and the SYSTEM. Without your help and encouragement myjob 
would have been much more difficult — you know who you are and-you will 
be missed. Also the Security DepartmenUwithout whose cooperation the 
paper would have seldom been on time, they let me on campus whenever I 
needed to work — thanks. 

Also to J.D. Vivian, an adjunct and fellow writer (I can say that now) he 
came alongside the Beachcomber and its staff to offer us his time and energy 
unselfishly — thanks John. 

There were many more examples of helpful staff, instructors, and 
administration, too many names to list them all, so here I offer my thanks 
and gratitude for your help and I want to share the success of the 
Beachcomber with each and every one of you — you know who you are — 

And If by chance we ever have the opportunity to work together again 
the pleasure will be all mine. ' 



Enough is 



enou 




A sickening epidemic 
is sweeping our land, 
the abuse and even 
murder of our 
nation's children — it 
must stop! 

By STACEY SKINNER and 
D.S. VLLERY 

There is a horrible, tragic and 
soul-corrupting epidemic sweep- 
ing the United States' right now. 
The wholesale murder of young 
children by the very individuals 
who are supposed to be the ones 
that these poor little souls are able 
to trust above all others — their 
parents. 

Not two weeks after the terrify- 
ing turn of events that concluded 
the search for Christina Holt, this 



MICHAEL tKD ALEXANDER SMITH 




' But whpso , shall ofi 
tetter tor mm ' 
Were 




country was again slapped in the 
face by an unexpected, and all too 
grotesque, murder. We refer, of 
course, to the two Smith boys of 
South Carolina. 

Enough is enough!! In the past 
month the news has bombarded 
us with case after case of child- 
murder initiated by parents. First 
Christina, then the Smith boys, 
then the child found dead in the 
backyard of a California home. Is 
it something in the drinking wa- 
ter? Parents are supposed to pro- 
tect — and this is the key word 
here, protect their children from 
"the world. Now all of a sudden, the 
world needs to protect children 
from their parents. On the morn- 
ing of Nov. 8, Y100 D.J.'s Bobby 
and Footy broadcasted live from a 
Miami courthouse where outraged 
parents and children picketed, let- 
ting their voices be heard. One 
six-year-old bore a sign reading 
"Beware of parents, not strang- 
ers. " It is a sad state when children 
begin to fear their parents more 
than they do strangers. 

It has become a chore to watch 
the news or read a newspaper these 
days. Who wants to find out what's 
going on around them when they 
know for certain that the informa- 
tion they receive will describe the 
most debased crimes human be- 
ings can commit? 

We can only pray 
that the justice system 
finally gets off its tail 
and kicks the process 
of prosecution into high 
gear. There are no gray 
areas to be found here 
— it's all in black and 
white. Susan Smith and 
the Zile's (both of them) 
must be punished. In 
the name of those chil- 
dren who have already 
fallen victim to this hor- 
rendous plague of 
death, let's hope it will 
happen soon. 
To repeat: ENOUGH IS 
ENOUGH! 



Editor/Layout 

Associate Editor 

News Editor 

Entertainment 

Editor 

Advertising Manager 



• the BEACHCOMBER 



— \m — 

Florida Community College Press Association 

Award Winners 

— George P. Reis — 

First Place Best Arts Review 

& Second Place In-depth Reporting, 

— Robert G. Gerard — 

Third Place Sports Photo. 

— the Beachcomber (Mike Mitseff) — 

Third Place Design/Layout. 

— 1994 — 

Mike Mitseff 

First Place Best Arts Review 



Mike MilaolT 
Jim Slravlnu 

Staccy Skinner 
D.S. Ultory 

Judle Caaavanl 



.,-.■- Contributing Reporters /Photographers 

Cindi Newman, Art Kennedy, Dan Kennedy, 
Lpura Lafayette, Chris Harris, Robert Wimberly, Shireen Mohan, 

Rebecca Joy Grayson, John Nlcodemo, and Wienna Ingrahani 
Opinions expressed in the Beachcomber do not necessarily reflect 
the views of the Beachcomber or Palm Beach Community College. 
Letters to the Editor must be signed. 

Palm Beach Community College 

the BEACHCOMBER 

4200 Congress Avenue 

Lake Worth, FL 33461-4796 

(407) 439-8064 Fax (407) 439-82 10 




Dr. Edward M. Eissey 
President/Publisher 




M.h. Vic'kl Sehduivi" 
Faeully Adviser 



Stop bashing 

president 

Clinton. 

By RONALD ANTONIN 
FAU Correspondent 



and the negotiations between Is- 
rael and the Palestinians. 

Mark Mahathey, a student in 
Respiratory Therapy, disagrees 
with Middleton. According to Ma- 
hathey, the government share of 
the Gross National Product (GNP) 
has been increasing since Clinton 
took over the White Mouse. Ac- 
cording to Mahathey, Clinton \h 




% 



'Thanks to the Clinton admin- 
istration, every American knows 
about health care," said Sally 
Middleton, professor of His tory and 
Political Science, during a political 
forum at the Eissey campus on 
Monday Oct. 24, 1994. 

According to Middleton the Re- 
publican obstructionists in the 
Senate don't want President 
Clinton to accomplish anything for 
the American people. 

Middleton also blames the 
media for not giving much atten- 
tion to Clinton's efforts. She added 
Clinton is the first president since 
the last two Republican adminis- 
trations to address and implement 
a Balanced Budget Deficit Reduc- 
tion, Tax Reform, a Job Corps or 
Crime Bill. Middleton credits 
Clinton for making taxation more 
progressive. She also praises the 
president for his success in for- 
eign policy, contrary to his expec- 
ted failure by the Republicans. 
Middleton credits Clinton for the 
solution to the North Korean cri- 
sis, the restoration of President 
Aristide to Haiti, his quick action 
to stop the Iraqi buildup of forces 
near the Kuwait border, the Peace 

Treatv hf=>i\xrpPT-i .Tni-/-^,-, n *A t. i 



not the right president, 

According to Bradley Biggs, 
professor in African-American His- 
tory, Clinton inherited the deficit 
W i!f n he became President. Biggs 
added, if we must place blame, 
then we must blame the last two 
Republican administrations. 

As far as health care is con- 
cerned Biggs said, there is a lot of 
unnecessary spending under the 
private system and the public is 
paying for it. According to Biggs, 
his current private health cover- 
age doesn't offer any better than 
the one the administration pro- 
poses. 

According to Shawn Smith, 
professor in Political Science, the 
Clinton administration has already 
reduced the deficit, inflation is 
under control and further reduc- 
tion in the deficit is projected for 
next year. J 

Mahathey attributes his rejec- 
tion of Clinton's health care to the 
fear of potential high inflation with 
the government having to care for 
everyone including those who don't 
work. 

"What is wrong with taking care 
of your fellow man?" a «kf>d ,r™» 




Rob Morphew 



Photo By Mike Mitseff 



MORPHEW/ 

from front page 

it was a vivid example of the enthu- 
siasm and reverence he invokes 
among his fans. 

But just as much enthusiasm 
is exhibited by those who could 
not stomach his style. To them he 
is obnoxious, arrogant, and much 
too demanding. 

Student complaints had always 
been part of the Morphew Experi- 
ence. Some students confronted 
him directly, even threatening to 
kick his butt;, and some went over 
his head to get action. But while 
this course of action formerly re- 
sulted in the students' being sent 
right back to Morphew to work it 
out, later, after a personnel change 
in Morphew's department, a new 
political climate evolved. The com- 
plaints now came not only from a 
few disgruntled students, but from 
his own department. Finally, ac- 
cording to Morphew, a final threat 
was leveled by the administration: 
in effect, he was told to chill out or 
get out. 

"I was told that I didn't have 
enough concern for the students, 
that I wasn't thinking about them 
enough," he says. 

Needless to say, he ignored the 
warnings. 

Morphew counters that it's the 
school that does not have the best 
interests of the students in mind. 
"Schools require less and less, and 
they don't teach kids to think on 
their feet." 

And then there are the careerist 
concerns of the tenured 'old-boy 
network' that he calls 'lazy and 
apathetic,' who are generally re- 



Although their grades may be rising, American students 
consistently place near the bottom internationally 



sistant to change and frown upon 
the incriminating zeal of more en- 
ergetic adjuncts. Out of context 
this could be construed as sour 
grapes, the rantings of a bitter 
outcast, but he says that he is not 
the first to leave in disgust, or to be 
forced to quit, or retire early as a 
result of a "new wave of (educa- 
tional conservatism) — almost fas- 
cism." 

Neither are these problems pe- 
culiar to PBCC. 

The issues of tenure and cur- 
riculum goals are what many crit- 
ics and reformers across the na- 
tion are debating as the main rea- 
sons for the failures of the Ameri- 
can educational system. In the case 
of tenure, those who patently up- 
hold the status quo claim it to be 
Irrelevant to education's ills; but 
reformers claim that it encourages 
laxness by removing incentive and 
competition — natural enemies of 
mediocrity. In the case of curricu- 
lum, since the late sixties, a gradual 
shift away from developing criti- 
cal-thinking skills has moved the 
focus of the schools to prioritize 
the development of self-esteem, 
using questionable methods like 
the promotion of lowering stan- 
dards to allow the less capable to 
compete, and placing students in 
situations they are not prepared to 
participate in to avoid "stigmatiz- 
ing" them. Everyone loses accord- 
ing to critics of those methods, and 
students who need special atten- 
tion do not get it, and students 
who could move ahead are held 
back while the slower students 
struggle to keep up. 

Morphew's claims are thus both 
echoed in wider circles as well as 
substantiated by the numbers. 

Berkeley professor John Searle 
was quoted in the May 24 issue of 
the National Review as saying that 
"universities (are moving from be- 
ing) knowledge-based to politics- 
based," and in his Index Of Lead- 
in g Cultural Indicators , former 
Secretary of Education William 
Bennett points out that while 
American students have consis- 
tently placed near the bottom In 
international testing, their grades 
have actually risen, and so has 



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Delta 



db M mm 
Phi Omega 



Sign up today! 



Join the frat guys and sorority sisters for 

Pledging, Rush Week, Road Trips, and 

Parties! 



CALL PRESIDENT MATTHEW JEROME AT 
471-6061 & LEAVE A MESSAGE. 



"...I did not want to simply teach art. 

Whatever subject you are studying should be 
used as a tool to examine everything, to make 
people aware of that which we experience but 
do not understand." — Rob Morphew 



their deluded confidence. Ameri- 
can students were absolutely con- 
vinced they had done well in a 
1988 math test in which they were 
soundly beaten by the Koreans 
(who, incidentally, generally felt 
they had done poorly). 

And while Bennett's book 
seems at times to be a typically 
Republican study in the malleabil- 
ity of statistics, one does not even 
need to leave our own campus for 
confirmation of his many sound 
points. Just note the proliferation 
of remedial classes as opposed to 
the conspicuous scarcity of classes 
geared towards gifted or talented 
students. 

"There are hardly any honors 
classes offered, and they fill up so 
fast I can never get in," lamented 
one student, while some others 
complained of boredom, dumbed- 
down material, and lazy or fre- 
quently absent teachers. And all 
asked that their names be withheld 
for fear of repercussions showing 
up on their report cards. Still other 
students exulted that certain 
classes could be counted on for an 
easy A. Like Art Appreciation, which 
was Morphew's bailiwick. 

"Normal people are now almost 
illiterate," he says bluntly. "I was 
intolerant of students who couldn't 
read. I didn't, want to slow the rest 
of the class down with remedial 
work. But I do believe in helping 
people out who need it. People who 
screwed up should get a last 
chance, there should be some al- 
lowances, but this shouldn't be a 
glorified grade school." 

"It seems that I'm obligated to 
teach them, but that they aren't 
obligated to put in any effort at all. 
I lose about 10% of my class by the 
second day," Morphew said. 

The question could be asked, 
"How much of Morphew's troubles 



were nothing more than the way it 
goes sometimes, when different 
people try to occupy the same 
space? Or, how much of his re- 
moval is a solid example of what 
seems to be a national phobia 
where words like "elitism" and "in- 
tellectual" are thrown around as 
insults, and educational trends 
seem to promote homogeneity and 
universal mediocrity over discov- 
ering and developing potentials? 
And what about the endless quibble 
over "rights" and "entitlements," 
without a corresponding concern 
for duties and obligations? Is 
Morphew a grouch? or are we well 
on the way to becoming a nation of 
Milquetoasts, whiners, and mili- 
tant crybabies? 

Morphew, at this moment, is 
not considering a return to the 
classroom, having refocused his 
priorities on his original passion, 
sculpture and stone carving. And 
here he faces yet another uphill 
battle. For the past thirty years he 
has suffered from severe arthritis. 
But he is as driven in one disci- 
pline as he is in another. His ap- 
proach to his life's work is as fo- 
cused as his approach to teaching: 

"I think that there should be a 
moral directive — it is as much 
what you do, as it is why you do it. 
I did not want to simply teach ait. 
Whatever subject you are study- 
ing shouldbe used as a tool to 
examine everything, to make 
people aware of that which we ex- 
perience but do not understand." 

Although squelched at PBCC, 
Morphew isn't dwelling on the 
negatives. 

"I resent the way things hap- 
pened, but I was still able to make 
some impressions, and that's what 
Is most important. But I couldn't 
do it the way they wanted me to. 
That would be meaningless to me. " 



.'.'FREE ROOM & BOARD.'.' 

in exchange for assisting PBCC Central Campus 
student Mike Mahoney. Mike has very limited use of his 
arms and legs due to Cerebral Palsy. Mike is an 
independent guy with a lot of spirit who needs some help 
in the morning & at night. This is an ideal situation for 
a nursing student or physical therapy student who would 
like to augment their classroom study with practical 
experience. 

And you would be helping to; free Mike from 
institutional "living." If you have thefime/ and the 
heart, please contact Mike Manhoney at 689-0386 
after S p.m. and leave a message. Or call his voice mai 
at 371-2157 — or call MedPlex at 478-9900. 



l iI*7I II W¥W(» , '""" IBI HMil i l ib H I II I III! I II I I Mill II I Mill llllll Ml II II III 



Page 4 



the BEACHCOMBER December 14, 1994 



December 14, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 5 



T 






MEW: 

j[ W the Beachcomber &l 



Chairman of the PBGC Board of Trustees 
is named Bele Glade 'Citizen of the Year 9 



By REBECCA J. GRAYSON 
Staff Reporter 

Homer J. Hand, Chair- 
man of the Board of Trust- 
ees at Palm Beach Com- 
munity College won the 
Citizen of the Year award at 
the 30th Annual Awards 
Banquet held Oct. 25 by 
the Belle Glade Chamber 
of Commerce. Hand, a resi- 
dent of Belle Glade, re- 
ceived a standing ovation 
from his friends and co- 
workers when longtime 
friend Dr. Joseph Orsenigo 
presented him the award. 
Led to believe that 
PBCC was receiving a spe- 
cial community-pride 
award. Hand was shocked 
but pleasantly surprised to 
learn thathe had been cho- 
sen for Belle Glade's high- 
est honor. Accepting the 
award, a humble Hand 
said, "As I look around this 
room, I see 100 people more 
deserving of this than me. 
It's my privilege to live in 
one of the finest communi- 
ties in the whole United 
States. I deeply appreciate 
this. To be chosen for an 
honor like this by your 
peers gives it more mean- 
ing." 

Dr. Orsenigo, who 
served on the committee to 
determine this years award 
winner, cited Hand's many 
community involvements: 
Fund raiser for the Boy 
Scouts of America, Com- 
munity United Methodist 
Church Finance Commit- 
tee, Masonic Order, and 
PBCC's Living Christmas 
Tree (Glades Campus). 
Hand, a real estate 



owner and operator, was 
appointed to PBCC's Board 
of Trustees in 1989. He has 
been associated with the 



pus into existence." And, 
she added, "Homer is mod- 
est, unassuming, effective 
... a genuinely nice guy." 



"I've come to understand that life is 
wonderful and it's what you make of it 
that counts." — Homer Hand 



college in one capacity or 
another for over 25 years. 
And his objective is to en- 
sure that PBCC continues 
to be the very best commu- 
nity college in Florida. 

PBCC's Dr. Elizabeth 
Erling described Hand as 
dynamic and "whose inter- 
est is in the students." 

A native Floridian, 
Hand was born in Hendry 
County and is a descen- 
dant of a family noted in 
pioneer-day chronicles 
dating back to the late 
1800s. He served in the 
U.S. Navy during World War 
II. After being honorably 
discharged, he went back 
home to help support his 
two younger sisters. 

Although he has very 
little formal education, he 
has been fortunate to have 
some outstanding teach- 
ers in his mostly informal 
but long educational pro- 
cess. This is one of the rea- 
sons that he is an avid be- 
liever in the importance of 
an education. 

Dr. Helen Franke, pro- 
vost at PBCC's Glades cam- 
pus said, "The Hands were 
a very significant force in 
bringing the Glades cam- 



Hand is no stranger to 
commitment. His wife of 
forty years, Dolly Hand, is 
a PBCC graduate who re- 
ceived her law degree from 
Stetson University at the 
age of 20. Mrs. Hand also 
served on PBCC's Board of 
Trustees for 16 years. Dur- 
ing her tenure she was a 
driving force behind initi- 
ating the development of 
the Glades Campus Cul- 
tural Arts Center, which, 
appropriately, was named 
after her. 

While the Belle Glade 
campus is small compared 
to PBCC's Central Campus, 
Hand believes that a physi- 
cal education facility would 
make a nice addition that 
could be put to good use. 
sometime in the future. 

Hand is an avid water- 
skier, fisherman, and pilot 
who holds onto the notion 
that if you are physically 
fit, you will be mentally fit. 
He maintains that his in- 
credibly busy schedule is 
his salvation. 

His philosophy is 
simple. 

"I've come to under- 
stand that life is wonderful 
and it's what you make of 




t 



Photo By Mary Ann Reasner 

Mr. dnd Mrs. Homer Hand 



I 



i 



it." He eagerly shares his 
philosophy and it affects 
everyone around him. 

All of a sudden the 
world seems like a much 
nicer place. 

Hand's selfless contri- 
butions to PBCC and his 
community reflect his com- 
mitment to higher educa- 
tion and to sharing his 
standards of ethics and 
values through action. 



Such an enterprising 
and caring individual has 
earned the right to be 
named Belle Glade's Citi- 
zen of the Year. 




PBGC's Central Campus SGA sponsors 
black-tie Masqerade Ball 



From picnics to black-tie 
balls, the Central Campus 
SGA has it all. 




Party time... photo By Mike Mitseff 

A couple arrives early for black 
tie masqerade ball at the Omni 



By CI2VDI NEWMAN and 
MIKE MITSEFF 

Take 100 partyin' people 
decked out in formal attire and 
masks , a screamin' D J messin* witti 
your mind switchin' between drivta' 
dance beats and laid-back ballads, 
a balloon and crepe-papered grand- 
ballroom, and then fill them with a 
sumptious sit-down dinner and 
stand back. 

Palm Beach Community 
College's Central Campus Student 
Government Association spon- 
sored a Black Tie Masquerade Ball 
Nov. 7 at the Omni Hotel in West 
Palm Beach, a year -end grand fi- 
nale to a partyin' student govern- 
ment led by returning president. 
Ken Marion. Marion carried out 
his goal of bringing the students of 
PBCC together: the Family Day- 
picnic in John Prince Park was a 
nice preview to the Ball. But it took 
a lot of work to carry it off. 

"It was a lot of hard work, put- 



Dawkins, SGA Sargent-of-Arms. 
"We worked all day on this." 

And decorate they did: Candle- 
light lit the spacious ballroom, each 
yellow flame sent shadows across 
the glittering floral centerpieces 
on every table. Also, huge spar- 
kling masks and hundreds of 
purple, green, and gold balloons 
set the mood for fun. 

The dance-floor proved to be 
the hit of the evening. Also, Marion 
organized a conga line that snaked 
through the ballroom. Nearly ev- 
eryone joined in, hands on each 
others swaying hips, the slow mov- 
ing line of people lurching this way 
then that, picking up reluctant 
dancers at each table it passed. 

Marion ran unopposed for 
president of SGA this winter, so 
look for more activities that will 
allow students a time to unwind 
from their academic studies and 
loosen lm a little! 



The raffle for 
the 1995 
Jaguar XJ6 
that had been 
advertised in 
this space was 
won by Norm 
Ostrowski, 
Jane Hunston 
and Mary 
Anne Ricci. 
Proceeds went 
to PBCC 
scholarships. 



Float-building project taught fiBeshman the ins and 
outs of a sometimes cumbersome buraucracy 



FLOAT/ 

from front page 

enough to build and store the float on the flat-bed 
and available for about 30 days. 

Jerome was then informed ihat PBCC's Spe- 
cial Program Fund had only $2,000 budgeted for 
the building of the float. "All of the money for this 
project came from the school's Special Programs 
Fund, not from ICC or club funds," Jerome said. 
"And with only $2,000 and thirty days, I knew I 
would need a lot of volunteer help and someone 
to donate both the location and the flat-bed 
truck." 

He drove around for three hours looking at 
warehouses and other potential locations and 
asking business owners for help, advice, and 
suggestions. "I wanted something with huge 
doors, so I could build the float right on the flat- 
bed and then drive it out without having to take 
it apart and reassemble it just to get it out the 
door." He came up with the idea of an airplane 
hanger while driving past Lantana Airport. That's 
where Jerome met Owen Gassaway, a local resi- 
dent with a large airplane hanger at Lantana 
Airport. Gassaway, described by Ben as a "soft- 
spoken, kind, American grandfather type," do- 
nated the use of his hanger from Oct. 1 through 
Oct. 20, at which time the float would need a new 
home until its debut in the parade on October 29. 
Ben realized that this partial solution was better 
.than no solution and decided he would figure out 
where to move the float later. 

Next he needed a flat-bed truck and driver. 
With a phone call to Hertz, he quickly discovered 
that, at $145 a day, renting was out of the 
question. His search for a donated flat-bed was 
frustrating at first, but his perseverance finally 
paid off when he met Mr. Kauff, owner of Kauffs 
Towing-Transportation, who agreed to donate 
the use of a truck for 30 days, as well as a driver 
for the day of the parade. So with two of the 
biggest components in place, Jerome was ready 
to set out in search of volunteers to help build 
PBCC's birthday present to the City of West Palm 
Beach. 

It was at this point that Jerome started meet- 
ing with resistance. He went from the art depart- 
ment to the music department, from club to club, 
from friends to students, to faculty members; 
everyone agreed it was a good idea and wanted to 
help out, but no one would give a firm commit- 
ment. "Mostly people told me they would be there 
if they could make it," said Jerome. "What I 
needed was a small group of people who would 
give me a definite commitment to do a specific job 
at a specific time." When he realized that such a 
commitment would not be forthcoming from the 
PBCC population, and with only 3 weeks left now, 
he realized he needed to hire professional help. 
That would mean more money. 

Jerome went to see Dr. Melvin Haynes, Vice 
President of Student Services, and showed him 
what he had accomplished so far and how much 



Lifes lessons can make 
indelible impressions on us. 




Happy Birthday to ya! Photo By Mike Mitseff 

PBCC students party with West Palm Beach. 

he had saved the school by securing the donated 
hanger and flat-bed truck from local business- 
men. He explained his dilemma in securing 
volunteer help from within the school community 
and pointed out that with time running out, he 
would have to hire professionals to help build the 
float. Dr. Haynes agreed to raise the budget to 
$4,500, and Jerome immediately contacted Tom 
Bishop, a general contractor that helped Ben 
build parade floats for homecoming back in his 
high school days at Santaluces High. Together 
they designed the float's construction plans. At 
this point it was time to purchase materials. 

When the contractor requested funds to pur- 
chase the initial lumber supplies, Jerome passed 
the request on to PBCC administration and en- 
countered the next phase of bureaucracy. It 
seems that PBCC has a policy that requires that 
contractors complete their work before being 
paid. Both the school and the contractor refused 
to front the money for materials. According to 
Ben, several days went by with no work com- 
pleted, while he acted as intermediary between 
the contractor and the school. While it is under- 
standable that school administrators want to see 
the completed work prior to paying-off the con- 
tractor, the school certainly would have had to 
front the money for materials if there were no 
contractor involved. After days of inactivity, 
Jerome finally persuaded the contractor to pur- 
chase the materials himself for the sake of com- 
pleting the project. 

The next problem the freshman encountered 
was in getting the art work done on the panther. 
Since none of PBCC's art students would volun- 
teer to help recreate the panther logo, Jerome 
decided he would use an overhead projector to 
copy the panther's image onto plywood and sim- 
ply trace the projected image, When he requested 
the use of an overhead projector from the school, 
he discovered he needed an array of forms and 
approvals. In fact, the paperwork required to 
obtain even a transparency of the panther logo 
was overwhelming. "You need a form just to 
remove a pencil from the student activities cen- 



ABC INCREDIBLE RUM CAKE 



1 or 2 Qts. RUM 
1 Tblesp. Brown Sugar 
1 Cup Butler 
Baking Powder 
Lemon Juice & Nuts 



J Tsp. Sugar 

1 Cup Dried Fruit 

ITsp. Soda 

2Ltggs 

1 Cup Flour 



Before star ting , sa m pl e rum at ro om t emp erature. 

Select large mixing bowl, measuring cup, etc. Samplcrum again, it must bejust right, 
f o be sure rum is of proper quality, pour one level cup into a glass and drink it as fast as you 
can. Repeat. 

With electric mixer, beat 1 cup of butter in a large fluffy bowl. Add I seaspoon of 
rtuingar and beat again. Meanwhile, make sure aim is still at room temparturc. otherwise 
"T another cup. Open second quart if necessary. Add leggs, 2 cups offried druit and beat til 
high. If fruid gets stuck in bearers, pry loose with drewscriber. Sample that rum agai n, 
checking for tonscisticity. Next sift 3 cups pepper or salt (really doesn't matter). Sample 1 
teensy weensy cup of mm. Shift 1/2 pint lemon juice. Fold in chopped butter and the strained 
nuts. Add 1 Bablespoon of Brown Sugar — or whatever color you can find. Wix Mcll. 
Grease oven, Turn cake pan to 350 gredees. 



ter," complained Jerome. When he considered 
the additional equipment needs he faced, includ- 
ing microphones, speakers, and an amplifier for 
music on the float, he realized he needed help in 
getting through the maze of bureaucracy inher- 
ent in school activities. He found that help in 
Esther Stewart. 

Esther works in the Student Activities Cen- 
ter. "Words can't explain it," a grateful Ben 
Jerome exclaimed. "Esther knows everything 
that goes on in this school. She knows 
everybody... everything..." In business courses, 
this is what is known as the informal organiza- 
tion: the human side of an organization that does 
not show up on any organizations chart. Ben 
learned that when dealing with a formal bureau- 
cratic organization, it is important to learn who 
the important people are in the informal organi- 
zation, those who know how to get things done. 
At PBCC, that's Esther. She's known by some as 
the PBCC "Mom." With Esther's help, Ben was 
able to cut through the bureaucratic red-tape 
and secure the items he needed. 

In spite of the initial bureaucratic roadblocks, 
the time and money constraints, and the lack of 
general support from fellow students, the float 
was completed on time. When Owen Gassaway, 
owner of the hanger, saw the effort being put into 
the project, he even allowed Ben to keep the float 
in the hanger right up to the day of the parade, 
sharing space with his private plane. 

After all his work and effort, was it worth it? 
Well, according to Jerome, turnout for the parade 
was dismal. But the real value he received from 
this project lies in the lessons he learned from 
successfully dealing with bureaucracy, the skills 
he acquired in negotiating with school adminis- 
trators and the general contractor, the get-the- 
job-done attitude he reinforced in himself, and 
the impressions he made on those around him 
who were either involved in the project or watch- 
ing from the sidelines. 

PBCC's participation in the West Palm Beach 
Centennial Parade will probably not be remem- 
bered as a momentous occasion by aged resi- 
dents in years to come, but what was accom- 
plished was that one student was able to learn 
some valuable lessons that cannot be taught in a 
classroom. Leadership skills that may prove to be 
of value to the community some day. And he was 
able to serve as an example of what one person 
who takes his or her responsibility seriously can 
accomplish when faced with adversity. 

That's what education is really all about 
anyway, isn't it? 



PALM BEACH 

COMMUNITY 

COLLEGE 

WILL BE 
CLOSED 
DEC 22 

ANDWILL 

REOPEN 
JAN.M995 

CLASSES BEGIN 
JAN.4/1995 



TTT i r mVTir T i ll !'■ ' UT O ' T I T 



Page6 



the BEACHCOMBER December 14, 1994 



December 14, 1994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 7 




Associatein Science Degrees 



Accounting Technology 

Maria Rosa Garcia 
* Randall C. Johnson 
Darinka Salha 

Aircraft Piloting 

*** Shawn Michael Marrin 

Business Administration 
and Management 

Penny Loud Brown 
Kenneth R. Davis 
Anapaula C. DeCarvalho 

** Patricia A. Goodson 

** June Lois Johnson 

* Diana L. Pica 
James A. Smith 
Geraldine Elizabeth Wooten 

Child Development 
and Education 

Willie Mae Dean 

Computer Information 

Systems Analysis 

** Winston E, Duncanson 
Luz Yamile Hoyos 

* Paul Michael Lowery 
Tracy Lyn Pancione 

* Mark Steven Simkowitz 
Mark A. Woodard 

Dental 
Laboratory Technology 

Zurima Empeiatriz Herrera 

Dietetic Technician 

Maria E. Gargiulo 



Drafting and 
Design Technology 

* Juan Pablo Cueto 

* Jose F. Perez 
Kevin Scott Reiling 
Manuel V. Sardinas 

Electronic 
Engineering Technology 

* Jacqueline J. Bauer 
Timothy E. Harrington 
Kevin William Horchak 

** Sharon Ann James 
Maureen Kelly 
Joel Lacroze 
Richard J. Seidel 

Fire Science Technology 

** Mary Catherine Madigan 
Jeffrey H. Matheson 

Graphic Design Technology 

** Sandra Lee Popp 

* Anthony Henry Vespoli 

Hospitality Management 

*** Sailianne Keating Barajas 
Regina Patricia Edler 

*** Brian Allen Laird 
William Berg Levine 
Lawrence Edward Randall 
Elaine Marie Utter 
Jeanne Marie Zeitler 

Human Services Technology 

Rosemary L. Candusso 
** Jaclynn Dwyer 
** Sharon Finn Ferris 

Stephanie Marie Haw 

* Anita C. Holmes 
Barbara Ann Lintzenich 
Adriana Matallana 



Frederick Gene Monroe 
Lorraine T. Pacecca 
Sharon M. Prather 

* Dolores Jean Purga-Littlefield 

* d'Arcy Dana Ries 
*** Susan E. Wagner 

Industrial 
Management Technology 

Charles W. Davis 



Land Surveying 

Andre Kina Desir 
Robert B. Lilley 

Legal Assistant 
Krisli Lynn Callahan 
Jean Burgess Graham 
Denise Laura James 
Colleen Sue O'Shea 
Margaret Dittmar Russo 
KimbeiiyA. Smith 
Deborah L. Wood 



** 

* 



Marketing Management 

Sheila Ann Carnahan 
Michelle Lynn Malkemes 

Nursing 

Keith Adnre Aldeghi 

Konomi S. AUegil 
*** Tarja Hamiele Allen 

Gilda Barella 

Elena Marie Barone 

Martha Bell 
** Lorraine F. Bellone 

Ursula Barrett Bennett 

Janice Marks Bouchard 

Jearmette E. Boyer 

Dawn Maria Brown 

* Susan Janelle Bullard 
Melinda Campbell 

*** Heather Naomi Carr 
*** Debbie J. Caireiro 

* Kathy Chamblee 

* Svetlana Constant 
Kathy Rene Crawford 
Jo Ann Cress 
Orlando Davenport 
Adam. Seth Day .... 

** Pamela Lynn Dick 
Arlene Andrea Douglas 
Sandra Margaret Dowler 
Kathy Lynn Edwards 

* Charles Anthony Fartto, Jr. 
Mary B. Forbush 

Paige Kelli Foryan : 

* Deborah T. Fracarossi 
Cara Gatewood * 
Margaret. E, Gignilliat 
Lynette Gobin 
Jeanne Marie Gomes 
Elizabeth Christine Guncsaga 

* Jacqueline Craft Hadeland 
Kami Kaleen Hardeman 
Deborah Ann Hargett 
Gloria Jean Harman 
David Lawrence Heller 
Beth Ann Henderson 
Claudia Barillas Henriksen 
Stella Karwoski Hubbard 
Ada Delores Jean-Baptiste 
Deborah Johnson 
Edwina Apy Jolly 

Karen .Jones 

* Kellie Sue Juarovisech 
Elizabeth Carol Kavaliauskas 

* Kathy Marie Knowles 
Leslie Suzan Koch 
Kim Elizabeth LaSalle 
Milacoya Deon Lay more 

* Maureen Lefkowitz 
Betli Shari Lehman 



*** 



Sue Lelo 

Jennifer Beth Levy 
Hilary Rebecca Liebler 
Robert Logan Lloyd 
Marvin James Loback 
Karen Cunningham Lomas 
Billie M. Walker-Lowe 
Irene Mary Lyons 
Ana Rosa Machado 
Murphy Edward Madigan 
Patricia Anne Manzi 
Elizabeth Ann Marshall 
Laverne Patricia Mitchell 
Michael Fredrick Molloy 
Margaret Mary Moran 
Crystal Ann Mowery 
Alicia Helen Neu 
Thomas Edward Nichols 
Pamela L. Parcell 
Frances Irene Partmann 
Imisa Patel 

Donna Diane Peacock 
Nancy Fox Pili 
Sandra Tryling Piotrowski 
Claire E. Powers 
Laurie A. Bass Pyburn 
Linda Faye Ramsey 
Adam Chip Reeves 
Arnelle Roc 
Trina Ann Rozas 
Karey Burdette Rusinko 
Anna Jane Selga 
Wendy Teresa Silipo 
Debbie Devoria Skinner 
Paula Denise Smith 
Maty H. Southard 
Elicieux Stanisciasse 
Sharon Annrnarie Staple 
Lisa Lewis Stevens 
Nadege E. Stevens 
Stacy Anne Stewart 
Joanne Marie Terrell 
Margaret Sue Tunnel 
Stephanie Anne Urban 
Cindy L. Versackas 
Geneva S. Winter 
Ellen Kay Wolf 
Sheila Kathleen Worthlngtoti 
Cheri Lynn Wright 



Office 

Systems Technology 

** Sandra Meador Best 

* Monica Fluke 

* Amy Lynn Rackstraw ; 

Postal 
Service Management 

Crystan Randall 



Radiography Technology 

Stacey H. Barnes 
Mary Elizabeth Bernhard 
Victoria L. Besmer 
Diane Brown 
Faith Marie Brunner 
Michelle I. Crosby 
Deborah Ann Cyganoski 
Tamara Lyn Dadowski 
Dawn Marie DeBartolo 
Elliott Dinter 
James William Gordon 
Bonnie Lee Heiferman 
Suzanne Marie Johnson 
Heather Lynn Lasch 
Jennifer Roberta Maycan 
Julie Lynn Nielsen 
Suzanne Elar Noonan 
Beatrice M. Patriani 
Margot Q. Pereboom 
Karen Ann Slinger 
Barbara Sue Smoot 






** 

* 



* 




iliSIBiils lilllllllliill 



'■'■■This': is ; notahexha^r^;lisi^St)!tt . ions-'fdr gr^d^atWh;had;iipt beeri:.pr6cess : ed: 

';before ; .£h^'B<^cft^ -indents are fendida^ 

■everyone .':dh this vliSL"|wi]Lfti:-.;lacL ; . diplorila ^ uhtil'successfully completing all 

.; requirements ; ;:a;^ ' : \ :j ;V,fvW 



^ WITH HONOR ^ a20-3;49 

" WITH HIGH HONOR -- 3.50-3'79: 

/ITHPRESiDENTIAL HONOR — 3.80-4:0 



Stefanie Lynn Tardiff 
Michael Francis Tracey 

Recreational Speciatist 

Michele Marie Blais 



Associate : in; Ant Degre(|%||i 



t 



! 



i 



Antoine W. Abel 

* Robert J. Abiusi 
John Scott Aekerman 
Joel Khristiann Adains 

* George A. Alfert 
Scott Edward Allen 
Terri Ann Amaya 
Janeene Christy Anderson 

*** Michelle Windsor Anderson 
Mayra Ivette Argain 

* Charles Andrew Atwell 
Brandon Michael Aultman 
Lance Frederick Bailey 
Leigh S. Berger Bales 
Diane Michelle Barclay 
Monica Evadney Barnes 
Deanne M. Barnett 
Junice J, Barr 
Dennis Bayer 

** Louisa Maria Bayliss 

Gaybrilla Beaver 
*** Pamela Joyce Beaver 

Theresa Lynn Bennett 

Noel Benoist 
*** MaryLou Link Benson 

Mimi M J3. Benton 

Shantarra Lavet Benyard 

Brian J. Bernasek 

Kathleen R. Besaw 

Amy Lynn Best 

Brian Bilby 

Carol Schwartz Bishop 

Charlene Kathleen BlancharJ, 

Sacha' Leiko Bolton 

Michelle Anne Booke 

* Dorothy Booth 
Erica Melany Brass 
Linda S. Brooks 

** Kyle Dean Brown 

* Christina Bruce 
Kari Audra Budyk 

** Michael Burchacki 
Kelly Diane Butler 
Shannon l^eigh Cameron 
Felicia Tatrice Canty 
Deana Lynn Carelli 
Tracy Kay Carpenter 

* Stephanie Lynn Carr 
** Jennifer Lynn Carter 

Elizabeth Ann Casey 

Spencer Dario Castro 

Patrick W. Caudill 
*** Kahtleen Cesaro 

Karen Hessex Chapman 

Wayne Victor Chernick 

Chloe Renee Chesliiie 
*** Ryan E. Childress 

Jon Michael Chockletr. 

Karen Alexis Choo-ket-Iouni|f 

Billy Chou 

Gia Cicerchia 

Julie Yvonne Clark 

Lisa Lynette Clay 

Jason Lee Clemens 

Jason Cohen 

Gregory T. Corbitt 

Diego T. Cordoba 

Christopher Michael Corso . 

Walter Mino Cortez 

Victor Hugo Cuesta f. 

Tonya Maiie Custeau | 

Timothy James Daly | 

* PhriatoDher Michael DeMoaj 



t: 



Laura Lee DeWain 
Amy Lynn Del Dotto 
Jefiery Allen Dethuin 
Ann Maren Donovan 
Michelle Lynn Dorman 
Nora Jeanne Doxsee 
Alexandra Doyle 
Michelle Marie Drayson 
Jason Harden DuBois 
Angela Christina Dudones 
Donna Michele Duncan 
Timothy Patrick Dunn 
John Jerokl Duraii 
Shawn Robin Durham 
Shannon Lynn Eadry 
Stacey Lyn Edwards 
Angela Enyart 
Oges Fadael 
Michael Glenn Faurot 
Marva Christine Fe-nelus 
David A. Flach 
Patricia Nesbitt Folsom 
Heloisa Fortes 
Ernande Fortune 
Jason Alfred Forwood 
Stacey Jeanne Fowler 
Jeffrey Frayser 
Cecilia Galliano 
LauraS. Gallo 
Linda Gannon 
Todd Frederick Ganser 
Mary Katherine Garvin 
Igor German 
Robert Silvio Ghianda 
Ronald Gene Glenn 
Sheldon Ross GUck 
William John Goldberg 
Richardo Javier Gonzalez 
Mark C. Grandusky 
Elisabeth B.'Gruner 
Christopher Paul Guido 
Jayne D. Gunby 
Darien R. Hallagan 
Sean Jason Hamblet 
Eric Hance 
Ronica Hardway 
Chernell Dhalentzer Harris 
Kelly Patricia Haston 
Heidi Lynne Hay 
Diane Marie Healey 
Susan A. Henke 
Ruth Renee Henry 
Hilda Mqjica Hernandez 
Kristie Hernandez 
John Paul Hicks 
Margaret Allison Holmes 
Michelle Lin Holt 
Tanna Galean Holtrey 
Vicki Louise Horn 
Sharon Rose Houseman 
Jennifer Arm Houser 
Minh Van Huynh 
James Charles lacouone 
Jeanetle Louise Jackson 
Roskei Stephen Jackson 
Todd M. Jackson 
Kristeena L. Janes 
Erik C. Jenkins 
Debra Susan Jennings 
Sandra Anne Jestead't 
Jennifer Noelle Jones 
Jennifer Rebecca Jones 
Robert Daniel Rata 
Stanley Martin Kay 
Scott Christopher Keipper 
Timothy Patrick Kennedy 
Debra Kerr 
Penny S. Kindl 
William Andrew Kirik 
Amy Louise Kosrna 
Kimberly M. Kostun 
Coreen L. Kraus 

Lien Onllcm^ tj-_ 1 1 



Dawn Marie Kuhn 
** Deanne Marie Larson 

Stephanie Shanette Lawrence 

Charles Anthony Lawson 

Brian Alan LeBrun 

Peggy Joyce Leach 
*** Gisele Chemin Lee 

Rachelle Kristine Lee 

Melissa Marie Lefevre 

Beth Anne Lefler 

Louis Paul Lemenze 
** Lawrence J. Levesque 

Brenda Warner Liebnow 

Esther Maria Liem 

Scott Allen Lillico 

Christina M. Lin 

Clyde Thomas Little 
** Kelly Kathleen Loftus 

Deborah A. Logan 

Amy Lohman 
*** Mario M. Maimone 

Frank Thomas Malley 

Hanci Marc 

Kevin David Marsh 

Vieki Rinaldi Martin 

Margarita Elena Martinez 

Maria Nicole Martina 

Matthew Mark Mathosian 
•* Michael Matteo 

Cheryl Sharee McAfee 
*** Rachel Lynn McCaffrey 

Monte Scott McClymont 

Keesa Patrice McCoy 

Catina June McDonald 
: Patrick Lauren MeElroy 

Sean E. McGaughran 
*** Prudence Leigh McGovern 

Brandy Renee Meadows 

Dana Ann Mesa 

Dawn Noelle Miller 

Shaun Douglas Miller 

Teresa Margarita Diaz Miranda 

Victoria Lynn Mitchell 
** Paula Linn Mittleman 

Renee Lyrin Mbcon 

Noel Moises Montero, Jr. 

Michell Morgan 

Stacy Ann Muller 

Marcy Lynn Musan 

James Stephen Myers 

Ninon Luiza Nad 

Christopher Alan Nelson 

Linda Kleinekorte Nelson 

Kristen Marie Nevih : 

Kuen Ngu 

* Michael Kevin O'Brien 
Michael Joseph Q'Roufke 
Kelly Ann O'Shields 
Lalla Patricia Oakes 
Kelly Arm Outlaw 
Melanie Pacelli 
Danielle Theresa PagHa 

** J. Michael Patrick 
** Elizabeth Alice Payne 

* Michelle Anne Peters 

*** Aimee Rbthenburg Peterson 

* Shirley Dols Petreye 

* Danielle Elizabeth Pettifor 
*** John Earl Pettry 

Jason L. Phirsichbaum 
Tara Lynn Pickern 
James Robert Pike 
Katy Taylor Pike 
Patricia Lynn Pimsanit 

* Carolyn Tornol Pittelli 
Vincent Brian Pizzino 
Garrett Hale Powers 

** Mequita Dorsey Praet 

Daniel Grant Price 

Michelle Louise Price 

Sophia Edith Prieto 

Robert C. Quong 
** Susan Elaine Raisor 

Laura T. Ratcliff 

Jacob K. Raymer 






* 

** 



Selena Danese Razz 

Lisa A. Reardon 

Mohammed Reaz 

Allison Wolfe Reckson 

William Jarrod Reed 

Sherri Lee Reid 

Mia Jolanda Richter 

Amie M. Robbins 

Eliana Rojas 

Jodie Elizabeth Rolston 

Lori A. Rudder 

Debra L. Rupp 

Nancy Ann Russell 

John Russo 

Joann Marie Salinger 

Basem Samarah 

Michael J. Sanchez 

Vivian Santos 

Faedra R. Satchel 

Linda Kendall Schaeffer 

Catherine O'Hara Schatten 

Autumn Dawn Schlegel 

Elizabeth Whitney Scholl 

Kristen Welch Schwind 

Maiyellen Seifter 

Johnathan William Session 

Patrick Arthur Shaw 

Eugenia Marita Shepherd 

Christopher J. Shields 

Valika Shivcharran 

Douglas Dale Shupe 

Rolando Silva 

Jessica Renee Silvia 

William Scott Simmel 

Donna L. Simmons 

Cheryl H. Singer 

Jennifer Lynn Sinram 

Annie L. Smiley 

Sandra M. Smith 

Scott Joseph Sorensen 

Theresa Anne 

Southard-Cantelo 

Kim Lynette Sparkman 

Bryan Ross Spears 

Arlington D. Sprecher II 

Deborah Ann Starka 

Sean Mathew Stefan 

Dennis Frederick Stein 

David Laurence Stilli II 

Ana M. Suarez 

Andrea Jane Sweetman 

Suzanne Aileen Sweetman 
Alexander Sykes 

Roxartne Thomas 

Nora E, Tillis 

James Toney ; 

JoAnn Toohey 

Madeline Josephine Trasport 

Roger R. I'rudel 

Britta Nancy Turney 

Maria DeJesus Urbina 

Joan "Wilson Valentine 

Christopher 

Joseph Vanderbosch 

Julie Ann Vincent 

Sherri A. Vincent 

Elizabeth C. Weiss 

Brooke Allison Wenman 

Nicole Raquel West 

Tanya Elizabeth Wever 

York Benton Whipple 

Paul W. White 

Owen Matthew Whyte 

Lorie Widmark 

James A. Wilcox 

Patrick Aaron Wilkinson 

David C. Williams 

Primrose Mareen Williams 

Wendy Elizabeth Williams 

Michelle Lynn Wilson 

M. Susan Woofter 

Carta Robin Woolbright 

Danielle Monique Wooten 

Hanan S. Zaky 

Cindy Zemel 




Commencement' 

Excercises to 
be held at Palm 
Beach Jai Alai 
Fronton 

For some, on Tuesday- 
Dec 20, 1994 , the jour- 
ney will come to an end 
but for others, it's just 
begun. 

DIRECTIONS: 

1-95 to 45th street (Exit 54), 
turn east, the Fronton is ap- 
proximately one mile on the 
north. 

Line-up: 

Students enter the front doors 
of the Fronton and line-up will 
be in the left portion of the 
lobby. There will be no re- 
hearsal. 

Line-up for graduation is at 
2.00 p.m. December 20, 
1994, 

Processional: 

Faculty and Graduates in aca- 
demic robes. 

Dress for 

Commencement Excercises: 

Men: White dress shirt, dark 
tie, dark shoes and dark trou- 
sers.. 

Wbmert: Dark shoes and dress 
with a neckline that does not 
show above the collar of the 
gown; hairstyle that, will allow 
the cap to be worn level. 
No personal items are to be 
carried into the Ceremony; no 
corsages, signs, decorations, 
etc. are to beworn on your cap 
and/or gown. Only one tassel 
is to be worn on the cap.No 
smoking while in graduation 
line. 

Procedures: 

1) Graduates must be in the 
Fronton by 2:00 p.m. for 
proper-order-line-up and 
name-checking. 
2} Caps: Women keep caps on 
during ceremony. Men remove 
caps for invocation and Na- 
tional Anthem, replace after; 
remove for benediction, and 
replace after. All tasels to be 
worn on left side. 

3) Each candidate who attends 
commencement will be photo- 
graphed as the diploma is pre- 
sented. Graduates will receive 
a proof in the mail within two 
weeks along with information 
concerning photo packages 
and prices. 

4) Since grades are not avail- 
able prior to commencement, 
some students going through 
Commencement Excercises 
may not meet graduation re- 
quirements. These students 
will be notified in time to make 
up the deficiencies during the 
next term. 



Page 8 the BEACHCOMBER December 14, 1994 



December 14, i994 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 9 



ENTERTAINMENT 

Jf ^J the Beachcomber -**- 



The Cult hope to erase the disastrous response to 'Ceremony' 




"I have to take a lot of responsibility for that 
('Ceremony')," reflected Duffy. "That's a personal 
mistake I felt I made. I was very conservative. 
Why should we change?" 



THE CULT. 



Photo By Kate Garner 



Billy Duffy, Craig Adams, Ian Asfbury and Scoft Garrett 



\y CHRIS HARRIS 
<AU Correspondent 

Holed up in a swank hotel In. Spain hours before the first concert of 
The Cult's new world tour, lead guitarist Billy Duffy took the time to 
reflect on the past and to contemplate the future in an exclusive interview 
with the Beachcomber. With the recent release of The Cult's sixth album, 
the British band's in a rebuilding stage after their unsuccessful album 



("Ceremony," 1991) failed to ignite a fire in the hearts of the American 
listening public. The new album, simply titled 'The Cult," is set to 
rekindle the fire with a new sound that has both critics and fans bowing 
at their knees. 

"I think it's as good a record as anything we've made in the context 
(of) where it's at," said Duffy. "In five years time, people will look back on 
it and go, 'It's a great record.' I'm looking forward to going out and playing 
it." 

"Going out and playing it" is a bit of an understatement for one of the 
most exciting live bands to come out of England since the late 70s punk 
movement. The Cult won't be stateside, though, with their "Beauty Is In 
The Streets" tour until next Spring. In between now and then, the band 
will be headlining a tour of Europe and Australia with opening band 
Mother Tongue. 
From a gothic band to guitar-wielding monsters... 

The history of the band from 1984 up to 1991 was similar to a sexual 
experiment. The band's first effort ("Dreamtime," 1984) was like an 
innocent virgin trying to score. Lots of energy, but the band ha'd "a'tot to 
learn. From then on, the band released albums ("Love," 1985; "Electric," 
1987) that had gained more acclaim and sales than the previous one 
resulting in an orgasmic production on "Sonic Temple" (1989). After the 
orgasm was over, the band went into a refractory period. Their vision was 
blurred by the incredibly successful "Fire Woman" single, so the band 
tried to copy the same format on "Ceremony," but the sex, by then, had 
turned sour. 



See CULT/page 10 



The Quest Theatre presents 'Lady 
Day at Emersons Bar and Grille' 



By WIENNA INGRAHAM 
Staff Reporter 

When asked to write a review on the Quest 
Theatre's Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grille 
I welcomed the opportunity, but did not know 
exactly what to expect. But after reading an 
earlier, impressive review written by George P. 
Reis in the Beachcomber last February, my 
expectations were high. 

Arriving at the Duncan Theatre's newly 
named "West Theatre." the small rehearsal stage 
now being used for local drama companies, the 
small stage and- set left little to offer my then 
lowered expectations. I was curious and some- 
what anxious to find out what had impressed 
Reis. 

Beatrice Waldon. Executive Artist on the 
Board of Directors of the Quest Theatre, re- 
kindled my expections after an inspiring intro- 
duction. I prepared for the best. 

The lights dimmed and, wow, what a show 
it was! 

"Lady Day" examines the tragic life of singer 
Billie Holiday, re-inacted here by Janice Price. 
An extremely talented actress. Price brought to 
life a side of Holiday that is particularly painful. 
She expressed her anger for being misunder- 
stood by some critics who compared her to the 
"Old Billie." and not the "New Billie" she had 
believed herself to be. These critics chose to call 
her "Lady Yesterday." 

My sympathy for her grew as she gave a 
relentless and painful description of her past 
experiences, while traveling and performing 
across the United States. My heart melted as 
she gave an account of the number of times she 
was imprisoned without pitty. Her reasons for 
doing the things that landed her in jail were 
never taken into account. Neither was the pain 
from her horrid past ever dealt with. The fact 
that she was raped and that she was coached 
into prostitution by a prominent woman in her 



Anyone who considers 
themselves well-informed 
about the character and life 
of Billie Holiday should see 
this performance. It certainly 
shook my confidence in what 
I had previously believed. 



community at a very young age had much to do 
with her instability as an adult. Combined with 
childhood wounds and the adversity encoun- 
tered as an African-American female performer 
in the early to mid 1900's, she became self 
abusive and mentally tormented. 

Of course this is no excuse for her behavior 
but it does help us to understand the effects 
that societal pressures will have on ones' sense 
of self worth and emotional and mental stabil- 
ity. Tears welled up in my eyes as I watched the 
used, abused, and, thereafter, confused per- 
former draw attention to the pain of her un- 
stable past. Issues that were unaddressed were 
edged deep within her heart and mind - thus 
the derivative behind her immoral deeds The 
power to her voice came from her pain! But 
would she have been a successful jazz singer if 
she had not indured the blues? 

Anyone who considers themselves well-in- 
formed about the character and life of BilUe 
Holiday should see this performance. It cer- 
tainly shook my confidence in what I had pre- 
viously believed. p 

Price, accompanied byactor/pian istDamon 
See HOLIDAY/page 10 



"GENERATIONS": 
An exciting move to 
the future of 
adventure 

Captain Kirk and his starship 
crew pass the mantle to Cap- 
tain Jean Luc Picard and his 
crew as they continue to boldy 
go where no 'one' has gone 
before. 



By D.S.WULERY 
Entertainment Editor 

Well, after about seven months of pacing, 
nervous anticipation and foaming at the mouth, 
Trekkers across the country were finally able to 
witness the first screen adventure of Captain 
Jean Luc Picard and his brave, devoted starship 
crew on Friday, Nov. 18, as they boldly went to 
the future of universal adventure. 

"Generations" is, as the title suggests, a 
crossover from the familiar, classic Star Trek 
crew to the familiar, newer Star Trek crew. It is 
also a resounding success, one that has al- 
ready captured the imaginations of the very 
fans it was designed for. 

And therein lies the problem the critics who 
have trashed "Generations" have with this 
movie: they resent that it was designed for the 
Trekkers alone. Well, if you see the film, I do 
advise doing a refresher course on 'The Next 
Generation" just to keep up to speed. But this 
also prompts a question worth asking: What 
are you doing watching this film if you have 
only a passing interest in Star Trek? 



See TREK/page 11 



■ C ^7," r ~',»* " 





Jacob Getzoff 



File Photo 



THE BANANA BOAT 



By JACOB P. GETZOFF 
Special to the Beachcomber 

Brother Joe and Hump Camp- 
bell were ambling along the edge of 
the Delaware River in north Phila- 
delphia. The Cambell's boys were 
nicknamed Hump , as were all male 
members iof his family. The name 
was pronounced Camel not Camp 



Bell. Hump came from "camel" 
hump. They were picking flat 
stones and skimming them across 
the water when Hump pulled up 
short, and pointed and said "Wow"! 

"What wow," asked Joe"? 

"Look"! Hump yelled, "a row 
boat." Sure enough half on the 
shore was indeed a row boat. What 
good is it without oars he said after 
examining it. Undaunted his 10 
year old companion said, "Remem- 
ber those orange crates we saw 
back aways, we can make a couple 
of paddles out of them." Reluc- 
tantly Joe accompanied him back 
to the crates. After much pulling 
apart, and using rocks for ham- 
mers , they fashioned a pair of flimsy 
looking paddles. 

By this time both boys were 
caught up in the excitement, of 
having a boat of their own. The tide 
had risen making the boat float 
and making it easy to jump in. 
Using their makeshift paddles they 
reached almost to the center of the 
river. Alas! the strain was to much, 
the paddles broke apart causing 
them to drift unchecked. The two 



The ships horn kept wailing, adding' to the 

boys distress. Finally, they realized their danger, 
and dove into the water none- to-soon, swimming 
furiously. 



brave sailors were not concerned. 
They could swim like water rats, 
and could abandon ship anytime. 
Meanwhile they were enjoying the 
sensation of having there own boat. 

Suddenly the air was shattered 
by a loud screech . Both boys looked 
at each other in horrified amaze- 
ment. The Banana Boat they ex- 
claimed. The so called Banana Boat 
was a freighter which sailed up 
and down the river discharging its 
cargo at different dock locations. 
The ship was fast approaching the 
helpless boys in their drifting boat. 

The boys could barely make 
out the men on the deck who were 
apparently yelling and gesturing 
to get out of the way, not realizing 
their plight — no paddles. 

The ships horn kept wailing 
adding to the boys distress. Fi- 



nally they realized their danger 
and dove into the water none-to- 
soon, swimming furiously. After 
reaching the safety of the shore 
they watched their Banana Boat 
smash their proud little boat to 
kindling wood. 

Joe turned to Hump and said, 
"Do you think we can get arrested 
for stealing the boat"? 

"Nah"! was the emphatic reply . 
Hump, who fancied himself some 
kind of legal authority because his 
uncle was a Philadelphia lawyer, 
looked longingly at their smashed 
row boat and repeated, "Nah, the 
Banana Boat destroyed the evi- 
dence." 

Jacob Getzoff is a New Dimensions 
student here at PBGC and has been 
submitting articles for over four years.- 



The Rolling Stones gather no moss 



By CHRIS HARRIS 
FAU Correspondent 

Fifty-thousand wild 
fans were testament to the 
continuing popularity of 
four living legends, who 
appeared at Joe Robbie 
Stadium friday night. 

The Rolling Stones ex- 
ceeded all expectations and 



performed one of the great- 
est shows to grace South 
Florida in a number of 
years. Complete with fire- 
works, a monstrous stage, 
a large video screen and all 
of the latest computer tech- 
nology, to keep the MTV 
generation amused, the 
four English rock 'n' roll 



gladiators couldn't do any- 
thing wrong. In fact, the 
aging rockstars have never 
looked or sounded so good, 
despite their age. 

Mick Jagger, the lips of 
rock 'n' roll, was as ener- 
getic as ever, running all 
over the stage for the three- 
hour show. Jagger, who 



puts more effort into one 
show than most 90s rock- 
ers put into an entire tour, 
teased the audience with 
his beautiful vocal styles 
and his constant costume 
changes. This man is a liv- 
ing example of fitness. Is 
he really over 50? 

Not only were fans 
treated to one of the all- 
time greatest rock 'n* roll 
bands, but there were also 
quite a few surprises in 
store. The most popular of 



which was the appearance 
of rock 'n' roll legend Bo 
Diddley, who played one 
song which was the high- 
light of the night. The evi- 
dence was on the faces of 
the Stones as they jammed 
with Diddley on "Who Do 
You Love?" They absolutely- 
loved it, and so did the 
crowd. Diddley snaked 
across the stage playing his 
guitar while Jagger and 

See STONES/page 1 1 




Jacki Natale — 
North Campus 

"Great! I voted mostly for 
Republicans because the 
Democrats are not doing 
anything." 



Shawn Martin — 
Central Campus 

"I'm happy and glad for the 
Republicans. If politics 
doesn't get in the way then 
the change should be 
good." 



Nicole Bennette — 
Glades Campus 

"I'm really happy about it 

' becauseTm a Republican. 

Clinton hasn't done much 

yet, so it's a good change." 



the Beachcomber: 

JHlow oo you feel a£ouf 

the victory trie 
^/lepuoiicans scored 
ooer me Democrats? 

Photos and quotes 
By Rocco M. Ranaudo 




Marie Latouche — 
South Campus 

Things will get worse for 
me and all the other black 
People living in the U.S. The 
Republicans want to cut 
some welfare support. 



Ryan Childress — 
North Campus 
"I am happy to see a change 
but I hope we are not going 
back to bad economics." 



Scott Schloemer — 
South Campus 

"I think it is the best thing for 
the Nation, Clinton really 
does not have his head on 
straight." 



Waisam Sanarah — 
Central Campus 

"I'm very happy that the 
Republicans won, and now 
they can take over Congress 
after being in the minority 
for the last forty years." 



Soma Singletary — 
Glades Campus 

" I think Clinton will have a 
difficult time finding 
support among Republicans 
since fellow Democrats 
won't back him uo." 



iHitinrnuiFT'ii' iiiiiiiiIi'hm 



Page 10 



the BEACHCOMBER December 1 4, 1 994 



December 14, 1994. 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 11 



Lady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grille' 




Photo By Mike Mitseff 

The tragic life of Billie Holiday... 

Damon Carona on piano and Janice Price 
as Billie Holiday. 



Billie Holidays 
unfortunate bout with 
drugs is chronicled 

HOLlDAY/from page 8 

Carona, brought Holiday's old hits and favor- 
ites to life. Remember these? "All Of Me," "What 
a Little Moonlight Can Do," "Pig Foot," "God 
Bless The Child," and 'Them There Eyes." 

Under the spell of Price's hypnotic voice, 
and the brilliant accompaniment of Carona, I 
slipped into the moment due to their powerful 
re-inactment. 

This performance was not only a review of 
Holiday's life, but also an example of what 
perserverence can do. Andre Minkins, director 
of "Lady Day at Emersons Bar and Grille," and 
member of the administrative staff for the Quest 
Theatre, said that tremendous obstacles were 
overcome, even up to the last hours before the 
show, but by the grace of God everything fell 
Into order. 



Bravo to performers Janice 
Price and Damon Carona; Bravo 
to director ... Andre Minkins; 
and a job well done to the staff of 
the Quest Theatre and Institute. 



One more thing, I must agree with reporter 
Reis' statement to "Never judge an event by its 
venue. Or church social-hall gatherings should 
not be sneezed at." In my case, a small stage can 
and does serve larger purposes. Also, Reis wrote 
that "it's not a matter of luck that Quest has 
produced another wrenching, first-rate piece of 
work. It can only be attributed to the taste, 
commitment, and artistry that drives the Quest 
Theatre. " And in my own words, 'The Quest has 
proven once again to be worthy of a standing 
ovation!" 

Bravo to performers Janice Price and Damon 
Carona; Bravo to director and administrative 
staff member Andre Minkins; and a job well 
done to the entire staff of the Quest Theatre and 
Institute. 



The band is right back in it with 
their latest effort titled 'The Cult' 



CULT/from page 8 

"I have to take a lot of respon- 
sibility for that ('Ceremony')," re- 
flected Duffy. That's a personal 
mistake I felt I made. I was very 
conservative. Why should we 
hange? The last album ("Sonic 
'emple") was great. I really didn't 
jpen myself up to change." So, the 
band decided to record the follow- 
up to "Ceremony" with a producer 
that revolutionized their sound 
before; Rick Rubin. Rubin pro- 
duced The Cult's groundbreaking 
"Electric" album in 1987, but this 
time the teamwork failed to work. 
Duffy complained that Rubin 
hardly ever showed up to work 
with the band. Plus, the band was 
unconvinced by the direction that 
Rubin and co-producer George 
Drakoulias (who has produced 
bands such as The Black Crowes) 
were taking them to. The sound 
sounded too much like the 70s. 
The Cult wanted a 90s sound. 



Rubin and Drakoulias were conse- 
quently dumped in order to team 
up with producer Bob Rock who 
had previously produced "Sonic 
Temple." 

"Me and Ian flew to Vancouver 
and talked to Bob. He was totally 
committed to making a kind of 
different Cult-sounding record. It 
was a brilliant meeting. It couldn't 
have gone better," explained Duffy. 
The long and winding road... 

Now that the record has been 
released, it's time for The Cult to 
try to win back some of the fans 
they lost due to "Ceremony." Duffy 
was asked whether he thought 
winning back America would be 
an uphill battle. "I don't think it's 
uphill. A lot of people who were 
buying our records like 'Love, ' 'Elec- 
tric,' and probably 'Sonic Temple' 
have grown up a lot since then. 
They've probably moved from their 
early 20s into having jobs and a 
whole different thing. They're not 
In that age group that buys records 
as much anymore. They've 



Are you interested in playing 



iBoCSOCCER? 



Practices 

held Tues. & Thursday 

from 3:00 — 5:00 p.m. 

Saturday 1 — noon 



Men's and 
women's teams 



Field is on southside of PBGC 
Central Campus adjacent to 6th avenue 



OPEN TO ALL PBGC STUDENTS 

FACULTY AND STAFF 



changed." 

Not only have the fans of The 
Cult changed, but so have the 
Cult's bandmembers. Lead singer 
Ian Astbury has exorcised a lot of 
demons that have been haunting 
his soul and he's back on the right 
track with a healthy appearance, a 
wife and a 18-month-old son. 
New members add experience 
to band... 

The band has also signed up 
two new permanent members. 
Craig Adams (formerly of The Mis- 
sion) has jumped on bass, and 
Scott Garrett is the new skin- 
pounder. With a new band lineup, 
new management and new respon- 
sibilities, the band has grown up a 
lot just within the last three years. 

"We are winning (the battle). 
It's like we're almost a new band 
again. We've got to win a whole new 
generation of people who's older 
brother maybe liked The Cult, " said 
Duffy. In the last 10 years since 
The Cult emerged as a powerful 
force in the music industry, and 
not only has the band and its fans 
changed, but so has the world 
around them. 

"Times have changed tremen- 
dously. We're in the middle of the 
1990s and I think by this record 
we always thought there would be 



a rebuilding process. I don't expect 
any benefits just because we wrote 
a couple of good records eight years 
ago. I don't care for special treat- 
ment," added Duffy. 
Plans for the future 

Even before the band's new 
world tour has started, six songs 
are already in the pipeline for fu- 
ture release (one of which has 
Johnny Marr, formerly of The 
Smiths, contributing his famous 
guitar licks). Chances are, though, 
the band will hold onto the records 
until the next album. 

'The whole of the new Cult 
album was very experimental, I 
would say that we're probably go- 
ing to keep the spontaneity and 
the attitude of let's do things 
quickly.' We're planning on trying 
to get (Bob Rock) to do an album in 
a year from now so that you would 
look at a spring release in '96." 

Busy times are ahead for The 
Cult who hope to regain a lot of the 
respect that they lost because of 
"Ceremony." With an amazing new 
CD and a tour coming next Spring 
to the States , it looks like the Ameri- 
can public will have the chance to 
show their forgiveness. If not, will 
this be the last we'll hear from the 
band over here? We'll just have to 
wait and see. 



PLEASE RECYCLE 
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Former editor of the BeachMBntber : 
wins Distinguished Alumni Award 

Ronald Dupont is recognized for his continued 
success after graduating from Palm Beach CC 



By STAGEY SKINNER 
News Editor 

He started writing for 
the Sun Press in Loxa- 
hatchee at the age of 1 4. At 
the age of 15, he was writ- 
ing front page stories for 
the Palm Beach Post His 
name is Ronald Dupont, 
Jr. and he is the recent 
recipient of the Distin- 
guished Alumni Award. 

In 1990 the Florida As- 
sociation of Community 
Colleges and the State 
Board of Community Col- 
leges developed the Distin- 
guished Community Col- 
leges Alumni Award to rec- 
ognize the outstanding 
alumni of the community 
college system. Each com- 
munity college identified 
alumni as representatives 
of their institutions. From 
these nominations, live 
statewide alumni were 
identified by the Associa- 
tion of Community College 



Trustees to represent all 
Florida community college 
graduates at a special cer- 
emony held in Fort Lau- 
derdale. 

For three years, 
1986,'87, '88, Dupont at- 
tended Palm Beach Com- 
munity College and worked 
as a reporter for the Beach- 
comberbefore accepting the 
job of editor in 1987. In 
1988, Dupont left PBCC to 
finish his education at 
Santa Fe Community Col- 
lege after a brief stint at the 
University of Florida in 
Gainesville. Dupont joined 
the Gainesville Sun soon 
after. Dupont is currently 
editor of the award-winning 
High Springs Herald., in 
High Springs Florida, a 
half-hour drive south of 
Lake City. 

The award surprised 
Dtipont, "Santa Fe called 
one day," he said, "telling 
me they needed some in- 



formation. They weren't 
very clear about what they 
wanted the information for, 
so I decided it was for the 
school magazine. I sent 
them my resume and ref- 
erences and the next thing 
I know I receive a letter 
saying I won this award!" 
It turns out that 
■Dupont's idol, Lucy Mor- 
gan, a St. Petersburg Times 
Pulitzer Prize winner in the 
mid-eighties, was also re- 
ceiving an award. Said 
Dupont, "I wanted to do 
the 'Waynes World' bow, 'I'm 
not worthy! I'm not wor- 
thy!"* 

The award, a ciystal 
obelisk, is named after the 
late former Governor LeRoy 
Collins to acknowledge his 
tireless contributions to the 
community college system. 
"It is beautiful," says Du- 
pont, "and it's sitting on a 
shelf at home." 



The Stones may 
be ugly, but their 
music isn't, 
which explains 
the aging band's 
long-running 
love affair with 
the rock-loving 
public 




STONES/from page 9 

company joined in. 

Other special guests who performed 
were blues guitarist Robert Cray and pop 
diva Sheryl Crow. These two, despite their 
obvious talent, weren't in the same league 
as Diddley, but their presence was appre- 
ciated nevertheless. 

When the Stones played on their own, 
the music continued to sparkle. Guitar- 
ists Keith Richards and Ron Wood, along 
with drummer Charlie Watts played their 
hearts out for the crowd who ranged in age 
from under 10 to over 60. With over 25 
songs played during the night, fans had a 
lot to choose from. Of course, the band 
played their classics such as "Start Me 
Up," "Satisfaction," "Beast of Burden," 
"HonkyTonk Woman," "Sympathy For The 
Devil" and "Brown Sugar," but the band 
also had a few more surprises up their 
sleeve. Who would have thought that they 
would play a three song acoustic set which 
accentuated a number of their country 
and western influenced songs? They did 
and the song. "Dead Flowers" never 
sounded so good before. 

A typical complaint among concert 
audiences is the too-loud volume which 
sometimes distorts the music, but the 
Stones, once again, played everything right 
and their volume controls were set at the 
perfect level. Every word could be heard 
clearly and the different instruments were 
recognizable throughout the show. 

The pure strength of the Stones's cata- 
log of songs was clearly evident through- 
out the concert as there were hardly any 
slow points during the show. The fans did 
appear noticeablv r^a+iooo +t .i- * 



ing a couple of songs (which included a 
new Stones song called "The Worst" sung 
by Richards), but every time it seemed the 
pace of the concert would decline slightly, 
the next song would be a classic which 
picked up the audience's spirits. 

Although the gigantic stage that took 
up a large portion of the stadium was a 
little disappointing at first, the set design- 
ers were forgiven when the Stones emerged 
from the darkness to play "Sympathy For 
The Devil." As they jammed on the begin- 
ning of the song, the entire stage erupted 
as massive inflatable images came to life 
and jostled among each other as if they 
were alive. As fast as they came, though, 
they soon disappeared, but the fans didn't 
have too long to be disappointed as a huge 
firework display lit up the cool Florida 
night and sent the fans into a frenzy. 

The concertgoers, despite the wide 
range of age groups, mingled together well 
and there were only a few minor problems. 
The majority of the crowd, however, en- 
joyed the lax security and could be seen 
dancing in open areas while the Stones 
provided the accompanying sounds. Some 
fans, including a topless woman who 
flaunted her body without a care in the 
world, obviously seemed to take the con- 
cert to new limits. So, a good time was had 
by all, including the Rolling Stones. 

The Englishmen came to town and 
proved to everyone that it's still possible to 
have a good time no matter what age you 
are.Don't be surprised to see the Stones 
performing into the next century — rock- 
ing their fans across the globe. 

Thanks to Chris Harris, now writing for 
FAU's Free Press, for his continued support of 



This movie is made with 
theTrekkie in mind... 

TREKKIE/from page 8 

This is the definitive Trek movie, a resounding suc- 
cess that combines the sense of friendship and loyalty 
that has become the characters' trademark with some of 
the best action sequences ever designed for a Trek movie. 

The plot involves Picard and crew pursuing a mad 
alien scientist named Dr.Soren who is attempting to get 
back inside of an energy field (called here an energy 
ribbon) in order to once again become enraptured by the 
Nexus — a world inside the ribbon where time has no 
meaning and events simply evolve based on the individu- 
als wants and dreams. In short, you spend eternity doing 
everything that ever did or ever will make you happy. The 
drawback here is that it's not actually real — and that 
eventually catches up to you on an emotional level. 

Another drawback is that in order to get inside the 
damned thing, Soren has to deviate the ribbon's course so 
it will pass over a specific planet where he has set up his 
base of operations. The only way to do this is to blow up 
a star, the resulting Shockwave being the only force 
powerful enough to move the ribbon from its everlasting 
path. 

Unfortunately, the Shockwave will also take out the 
entire star system surrounding the now extinct star. The 
problem herein is that the solar system that Soren has 
chosen contains a planet with 230 million lives suddenly 
in danger of swift and terrible annihilation. So the Enter- 
prise crew must face this crisis dead-on, and it makes for 
wonderful escapist entertainment. 

There's also a subplot about some renegade Klingons 
that works even better than the one in "Star Trek III." And 
one extremely funny subplot about Commander Data 
who finally decides that now is the time to try out the 
emotion chip. He has it implanted in his positronic 
network. The result of that little twist leads to Brent 
Spiner stealing the movie. Whether he's just understand- 
ing a joke after seven years, or reacting to imminent 
disaster. Data is easily the highlight of the film. 

William Shatner is on hand as Kirk in another plotline 
that I don't feel at liberty to discuss, but will no doubt 
affect viewers. I will simply point out that Shatner's 
performance here is easily his best since "Wrath of Khan." 

As for the rest of the cast, they are all as reliably 
entertaining as ever, with Patrick Stewart proving once 
and for all that he does have the charisma to carry the lead 
in one of these films. Likewise, Malcom McDowell's Soren 
is a wonder, and ranks with Khan and the Klingon 
"Chang" (from "The Undiscovered Country") as a most 
memorable villain. 

First-time director David Carson plays it intelligently. 
He emphasizes action here, and is wonderful at staging 
battles and actual hand to hand combat. 

The story moves, the characters are true-to-form, and 
the visuals are nothing short of absolutely spectacular. I 
definitely recommend "Star Trek:Generations" to any 
serious "Star Trek" fan. This film left me breathless. It is 
sure to take a deserved place of honor as one of "Star 
Trek's" greatest moments. 



PBCC'S LITERARY JOURNAL 



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APOiiO'S LUTE isnow 

ACCEPTING SUBMISSIONS FOR 
ITS 

1994-95 EDITION 

CONTACT DR. CAROLYN 
MARTIN AT MAIL STATION 

#47 OR CALL 4 Wm7 



Page 12 the BEACHCOMBER December 14. 1994 



s 



OMIC 



ihe BeacHconiber 




STRANGE 



ByD.S,IILLER¥ 




If you're a Florida college student who 
supports yourself through school, makes 
superb grades, and is active at your college 
and in your community, then you may have a 
chance at winning a share 
of more $30,000 in 
prizes in the 

Prestigious 1995 
lorida College Student 
of the Year Award. 




Twenty-three 
students from schools 
throughout the state 
will earn statewide 
media recognition in 
the annual award, not to mention scholar- 
ships and prhes donated by First Union 
National Bank, Winn-Dixie, EDS, Busch 
Gardens, Eastpak and more. 

■Winners will be announced at an April 
1994 press conference and reception in 



S FLORIDA COLLEGE ffl 
tudenT 




Tallahassee and will be featured in die special 
Student of the Year issue of Florida leader. 

Applications will be reviewed by a panel 
of distinguished judges, including former U.S. 
Secretary of Education Terrell Bell, Miami 
Herald Publisher David Lawrence, State 
University System 
Chancellor Charles Reed, 
and Florida C.C. Director 
Clark Maxwell. 

Far application ir\fo,pknsi 
send a self<addressed, 
stamped, busmesS'Siv 
envelope to Florida College 
Student of the Year Award, 
do Florida Leader magazine, P.O. Box 14081 , 
GameswHe, Fla. 32604-2081 . For dumb , call 
(904)373-6907. 

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POSnURKEO BT FEBRUARY 1.1M5. 



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PAPERS DUE AND 
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Call GaybriJla Beaver 

for all your 

professional typing needs 

{MICROSOFTWORKS}. 

Phone (407)478-7852 and leave a message. 



ML Uilery reviews the) 
best and worst of fall fi 94 

See page 4 



fCorida Community CoCCege 
Press Association 




1993 BEST DESIGN 

THIRD PLACE/STATE OF FLORIDA 



Jason Wilkeson returns] 
with Jason's Aimless In* 
signt § ee p a g 6 5 



r 



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\ i 



~\. - -s 



\ I 



THE STUDENT VOICE OF PBGC 



Volume 55 Number 4 



PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE ♦ LAKE WORTH, FLORIDA 



January 18, 1995 



James Kirk 
passes the torch 
to the "Next 
Generation. 95 

By D.S. Uilery 
Entertainment Editor 

In Memorial 
James Tiberius Kirk 
Sept. 8, 1966 to Nov. 18, 1994 

Stardate 1118.94: The United 
Federation of Planets suffered a 
tragic loss on Friday Nov. 18 in the 
passing of former USS Enterprise 
captain James T. Kirk. Captain 
Kirk who, dur- 
ing the course 
of a thirty year 
career, became 
renowned for 
his unerring 
ability to 

emerge victori- 
ous from both 
battle and per- 
sonal trauma 
succumbed to 
injuries sus- 
tained during 
a mission to save the inhabitants 
of an M- class planet, Veridian IV. 
Captain Kirk's successor, Captain 
Jean-Luc Picard commander of the 
USS Enterprise NCC- 1701 -D, re- 
ports that "Captain Kirk passed on 
having made a tremendous differ- 
ence. His love for human life and 
his dedication to the duty that 
accompanies his rank in Starfleet 
has set a standard that will remain 
years after his passing and will 
keep him alive in the memories of 
those who were fortunate enough 
to serve with him." 

James Kirk is survived by mil- 
lions of admirers and an entire 
generation of Starfleet cadets who 
have reached maturity studying 
his unequal command strategies. 
Starfleet has announced that there 
will be a monument erected in 
Captain Kirk's honor. 




James T. Kirk 



New Building Will Be Showplace For PBGC 

By Stacey Skinner 
News Editor 

The construction you see taking place in front of the. 
Data 1 Processing building is going to be the future sight of 
a Vocational Education building. 

According to Dr. Dan Terhune, chief administration 
officer of the central campus, this particular facility was 
four years in the planning and should be completed 
within 1 1/2 to 2 years. The new vocational building will 
host a vast array of classes including graphic design, 
construction management program, computer assisted 
drafting, all computer related courses, and new programs 
that have not been discussed yet. As an added bonus, the 
CPI lab will move there as well as all computer labs. 

Says Terhune, "I am veiy pleased so far. This facility 
will be a showplace for the Central Campiis." Covering 
80,000 square feet, the new building will certainly be the 
largest. Adds Terhune, with all the programs in that 
building almost every student should have an opportu- 
nity to have a class there. 

Exactly how much does a facility like this cost? you 
might be wondering. According to Terhune, 8 million 
dollars. But don't worry. The Public Education Capital 
Outlay Funds (PECOF) puts a special tax on utilities for 
the construction of educational facilities, so we wont 
have to help foot, the bill. Site of new Vocational Education Building, 

For Cool Music On The Radio, WPBR Is The Only 
Game In Town 




by Robert Wimberly 
Staff Reporter 

OK, kiddies, first get out your dictionaries and 
look up the word "alternative". You will find there 
there are absolutely no references in the defintlon 
of this word to anything that is both jammed up 
your nose and down your throat at the same time, 
24 hours a day, all week long, at all. Not even by the 
loosest interperetation. 

Somebody please explain this to Mtv. Maybe 
they could fax some of the radio stations that are 
knuckling under to "popular demand" (read: sta- 
tistics generated by computers and pondered by 
Suits sequestered in vaccuum-sealed office build- 
ings] that no matter how Alt-Rock Inc. pigeonholes 
it, it still sounds the same. 

Meanwhile, enter WPBR, 1340 am. Every Mon- 
day through Saturday, from 10pm until 2am, South 
Florida's second oldest radio station, propogates 
its psychic virus from that metal toothbrush rising 
from the backyard at Panther Park. 

"Until now, no South Florida radio station has 
been willing to play in this format, other than the 
lew songs that have crept into the mainstream 



SGA's President Ken Marion plans to tackle 
some very tough issues this semester. See page 3 



charts," says Floyd Kelly, Sr., director of the program. 
"We're the only game in town." 

Other radio stations are programmed from informa- 
tion collated from marketing analyses. Pop charts tell 
them what to play and they play it, sending the songs 
further uyp the charts in an endless loop of feedback and 



If the mainstream is accepting what 
you're doing, then you aren't doing 
anything, — 

Says Matt Dougherl 

reiteration, and we all know the result: carpal tun. 
syndrome from whacking the scan button over and ovt 
teary-eyed, despairing. 

The difference at WPBR is this: the DJ's have com- 
plete control over their programming, and there is a wide 

SeeWPHBTTagiJ 



AS COLLEGE TUITION CLIMBS.STUDENTS STRUGGLE WITH DEBT 



3y Judy Braginsky 

Special to the Beachcomber 

The $25,000 that University of California- 
3avis senior Corrine Walters figure she'll owe 
ifter earing a master's degree in plant biology 
scares her. She says she has no clue how she'll 
iay it all back and that school debt could eat up 
i quarter of the income she might expect from 
in entry-level laboratory job in biology. 

Hillary Wicai.newly graduated from North- 
vestern University's Medill School of 
JournalisJanded her dream job as a TV re- 
sorter with WFLI in West Lafayette,Ind.,but 
■ant afford the clothes to look professional on 
he air. Wicai struggles witha $2.1,000 debt 
rom the year at Northwestern that helped her 
and the job. "Every single thing I wear to work 
j^sglve n t o me by my mother and grandmother 



who shopped for bargains," she says. 

Despite their collective college sticker 
shock, Walters and Wicai plight is riot an un- 
common one. The American Council on Educa- 
tion forcasta a student at a public university- 
will spend $9,876 this year (up 5.8 percent from 
last year) on tuition.fces.room and board and 
supplies. At private unlversities.costs are pro- 
jected to rise by 5.6 percent to an average of 
$23,700. In fact, borrowing to pay the entire bill 
for four years of school at a private university 
could leave a student owing almost $100,000, 
plus interest. 

With college costs doubling over the past 
decade and increasing at roughly twice the 
ratye of ove rall inflation.the Census. Bureau 



reports that more than half of the 20.6 millior 
students enrolled in college or vocational anr 
technical schools obtained financial help iron: 
at least one source. Borrowing in the Federa 
Family Education Loans Program increased bj 
more than 40 percent in the 1993-94 schoa 
year alone, says Donald Stewart of the Collegi 
Board. 

"For many students, iinding a way to ft 
nance their education, may be as much of i 
challenge as the the acdemic training they'l 
have to master, "wrote Census researchers 
Rebecca Sutt.erlin and Robert Kominski ir 
areport released in October. Loans were thx 

See College/ Page? 



"waeamaWMtemwa 



Page 2 



the BEACHCOMBER January 18, 1995 



J7DITORL4T 

M ^ the Beachcomber JmmattM 



Robert Wimberly 
Commentary 



While We're On The Subject.- 

Remember the good old days when the only thing Joe Friday wanted to 
hear was the facts? And he was the good guy, and the bad guy was a Bad 
Guv? You could tell by looking. Who are they now? Are they the ones doing 
the" right thing for the wrong reason or the ones doing the wrong thing for 
the right reason? 

Are they Oliver North, national heroes for the amoral resolution to do 
their "duty", even if it meant following orders they knew were wrong given 
by people who were breaking laws they had been elected to uphold, and who 

won the hearts {and votes) ol complacent 
patriots everywhere for, of all things, their 
"initiative"? 

Or are they so-called religious leaders 
who preach hatred and bigotry as an expres- 
sion of God's love and whose social programs 

— have taken hundreds of kids off the street, 

made gangsters productive and responsible, and cleaned up neighbor- 
hoods that had been all but written off? 

We all had our heroes. We saw the things they could do, and they could 
do no wrong. They stood over us and smiled down, and everything was all 
right in the world. But ask one of Babe Ruth's girlfriends what kind of a hero 
he was. Ask President McKinley and William Randolph Hearst how the 
Spanish American War got started. Ask Eisenhower how the Cuban Missile 
Crisis got started. 

What are heroes? Heroes are only symptoms of chaos. When everything 
is running smoothly, they have no background of fireworks to stand 
against, backlit and larger than life, carrying the weight of the world on their 
backs as they run through the flames on the silver screen. 

We love them because they have no dimension. We aren't bothered with 
the complexity of their motivations. They exist for the moment and then 
they are gone, riding off into the sunset to live, presumably, happily ever 
after. 

We love them for their image, the appearance of strength and the 
assertion of values, and image is the most important thing; we are fueled 
by the illusions we create for ourselves. How many times have we run off 
in search of some holy grail, letting that search dominate every aspect of our 
lives, often at the expense of immediate needs? Nikola Tesla knew the 
feeling; "such emotions make a man forget food, sleep, friends, love, 
everything", he said. 

And we love them because they have something that we want, the ability 
to take control from forces stronger than themselves, to get what they want, 
and be satisfied. How many people have found that holy grail, and it was 
nothing but a leaky can filled with fiat pepsi? 

What one wants is a clearer definition of the state of one's soul than what 

WPBR Lake Worth's Alternative 



Editor/Layout 
News Editor 
Entertainment Editor 
Features Editor 
Sports Editor 
Advertising Manager 



Jim Stravino 

Stacey Skinner 

D.S. Ullery 

Jason Wilkeson 

Cara Cohen 

JudieCasavanl: 



the B EACHCOMB ER 

— I993 — 

Florida Community College Press Association 

Award Winners 

— George P. Reis — 

First Place Best Arts Review 

& Second Place In-depth Reporting. 

— Robert G. Gerard — 

Third Place Sports Photo. 

— the Beachcomber (Hike Hitseff) — 

Third Place Design/Layout. 

—1 994 — 

Hike liitsetf 

First Place Best Arts Review 



Contributing Reporters/Photographers 

Shireen Mohan, Art Kennedy, Robert Wimberly, 
3g Marsha Skinner, Rocco Ranado 

Opinions expressed in the Beachcomber do not necessarily reflect 

the views of the Beachcomber or Palm Beach Community College. 

Letters to the Editor must be signed. 



Palm Beach Community College 

the BEACHCOMBER 

4200 Congress Avenue 

Lake Worth, FL 33461-4796 

(407) 439-8064 Fax (407) 439-8210 





Dr. Edward M. Eissey 
President/Publisher 



Ms: Vicki Scheurcr 
Faculty Adviser 



he has. And wanting is the impetus that gives motion. Notice how 
movies end at the exact moment the hero reaches his goal? It doesn't 
matter what their lives will be like after their needs are satisfied. The 
allegorical value of the story is only that they got there, and liked what 
they found. The fantasy is fulfilled. But meanwhile in the real world, 
no matter how hard you scrutinize any religion, the only answers are 
platitudes, or that there are no answers. 

That is because the only real answer is continuous evolution; the 
fact that there are no answers is both the blessing and the curse of 
humanity. We are misdirected if we think we can wallow in our 
achievements or allow ourselves to be carried by some omnipotent, 
unseen and external force. What would we do if we reached the end? 
Or if there were suddenly nothing left to do? External goals may be 
present in the backgrounds of our lives, but the only thing that really 
matters is the endless extending of fingers into space, for no other 
reason than to go a little farther. 



WPBR/From Front Page 



variety of tastes among them. During the week, 
Steve Rullman (the Wormhole/Unseele Court 
guy) plays a local music only show. Tony White 
plays eighties retro tunes, Floyd Kelly, Jr. tends 
towards the gothic/industrial thing, and Matt 
Dougherty leans towards hardcore and what he 
calls "funny music". Fridays, the Night Man- 
ager brings a spacey collage of techno, gothic, 
experimental, tribal noise and anything else, 
spliced with recordings and sound bites that 
will test even the most open minds. 

"I figure that if I'm not pissing people off, 



then I'm not doing my job right," he 
says. 

This is echoed all through the 
staff. "If the mainstream is accepting 
what you're doing, then you .aren't 
doing anything," adds Matt 
Dougherty, who is also the prodution 
room operator for the show. 

For advertising information, call 
Mr. Kelly at 582-7401. To bug the 
DJ's call 582-8255. But a word of 
advice to the thin skinned: don't ask 
for Pearl Jam. 



PAPERS DUE AND 
NOT ENOUGH TIMES! 

Call Gaybrilla Beaver 

for all your 

professional typing needs 

(MICROSOFT WORKS) . 

Phone (407)478-7852 and leave a 

■ message. 




Former Morphew 
Student Speaks out... 

Dear Editor, 

I am writing in response to your cover story on ousted 
professor Rorbert Morphew. 

There can be no doubt that any controversy sur- 
rounding Prof. Morphew' s philosophy, objectives and 
methods boils down to the whining produced when the 
prospect for scholarship confronts glorified mediocrity. 
The culprits are pathetic public primary education, poor 
parenting, students entirely lacking in intellectual 
curiousity, a curriculum that is increasingly adrift from 
the intellectual rigors of the arts and humanities, and 
liberal apologists throughout. 

Professor Morphew was consistently devoted, articu- 
late, imaginative, and funny in the classroom. His depar- 
ture constitutes a victory for proponents of an education 
system that strives to make students feel good rather 
than think soundly. Although this battle was lost, Rob 
Morphew and teachers like him both motivated and 
armed many former students for the long war .ahead- 
against the cultivation in young men and women of the 
worst possible blend of traits: low IQ with high self- 
esteem. 

In 198 1 , 1 was enrolled in his drawong class at (then) 
PBJC . A few years ago, I took his Art Appreciation course. 
hold a BFA from Florida Atlantic in the Studio Arts, and 
I will receive my BA in Art History in June. I worked b 
years as a freelancer and 4 years as a United States Wf 
illustrator. Currently, I am dual-enrolled at Florida 
Atlantic and PBCC. 

Roy Edward Lush 



January 18, 1995 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 3 



«i 



NSSX 



New Semester,Same President 

By Stacey Skinner 
News Editor 

Well, it's that time of year again. We've just 
gotten off our Christmas holidays, gotten our 
well deserved rest and are prepared for the new 
semester. With the dawn of the new semester 
before us, we are facing the new clay with an old 
friend. A face we have come to know and 
respect. The face of the Student Government 
President, Ken Marion. 

Marion, who was elected SGA president in 
1993 ousting then president Brian Kenney, ran 
for re-election in November of 1994-unop- 
posed. Said Marion, "It was boring running 
alone, but there's always that feeling that some- 
one will come along who is better than you." 

Retaining the same platform as lastyear, Marlon 
promises to try to bring more unity to PBCC 
campus. Mainly by holding the same type of 
activities as last year; fishing trips, family day, 
etc... 

Now that he is facing a new semester, Marion 
plans to have the Senate tackle some pressing 
issues. He believes very strongly that SGA 
accomplished many tasks last year, including 
bringing more unity to PBCC, thus leaving him 
with more time to expand his horizons. 



improve y<^^ 

;y.y ■■,:;• .u ■■:'■■■■ -::.■:.;■ . y i'^'-S :/■ v. ■"■:; :: See page '8;" ; 




Ken Marion 



File Photo 



Marion was sworn in on January 10,1995 
and a small ceremony was held in the SAC 
lounge. Although Marion retained the same 
Executive Board as last year, he has no secre- 
tary. Said Marion, "Tyshon [who took over 
when Griffin resigned] was the best secretary, 
but due to complications in her pregnancy, we 
had to bring in Erica who then had to leave 
because her grades began to drop and she 
needed to concentrate [on her studies.]" So, 
SGA is looking for a secretary. If you can type 
relatively well, take good notes, have an under- 
standing of WordPerfect 6.0, are able to attend 
all the meetings, have a GPA of 2.0, and are 
rather friendly, then SGA needs you. Contact ' 
the Beachcomber for more information. 

For now, Marion is gearing up to full speed. 
He has many plans and hopes for this semester. 
Says Marion, "[I wish the] students lots of luck 
this semester and I hope they find time to 
participate in the activities student govern- 
ment has planned." Will he run again? "I don't 
know," says Marion. "I graduate in January of 
1996. Maybe I will if my major changes, which 
isn't likely." 



Super Bowl XXIX : One Fan's Look Ahead 



By Art Kennedy 
Staff Reporter 

fmislfw^ink 9 ^ P^rft 1 "? n b f L^elW P^yoBa approach a climatic 

tSS^S* ii h f League ' s 75th season - one man y are callin s 

ffnSTff^r? ° f the IeagUCS 28 teamS ™ ln aIiv ^ 

™ ST , " U1 ^ e second t0 the last S ame of the season. 
wfW r f °° tba r 1 Confe rence(NFQ playoffs saw for the first Lime in 

toSSS^i^r 6 ? 11 1! 1 " Cen ! ral dMso "( M1 ™esota, Chicago. Green 
my and Detroit) qualify for die post season. They were loined bv the Sin 

^Su^r f? d thC ^ C0Wb °^ whteh ™ ^ Snowed" 
the NFC fade * exspecterUhe 49ers *>d the Cowboys meet for 

thei^DosWon swv 66 P la ^ rs T conslc lered to be the best in the league at 
Sfens 1 ™ n ? m ? *£? Jen y ra <* lead «* Ague's most explosive 
to^S^S^ 8 ^ Hayer d &e Year ' Deon &»*«* heads one of 



Check oiit':D,S v ,LT|leiry^:,re^ew:of- : >' 
Dumb andBiimlber ' :i MiM&im^€ 



SiS5 e ? ' Li g htm an':Meet Danny Morick 

News Editor 

They are everywhere, all around 
you. You walk under them in the 



Hie Cowboys also boast several All-Pros on botii sides of the ball including 
Troy Aikmen and recievers Micheal Irving and Alvin Harper. Look for the key to 
the game to be 2-ttaie super bowl MVP Emmitt Smith although he is question- 
able with a pulled hamstring. 

Just like the first meeting earlier this season the game will be close until the 
end with big plays on both sides. Look for the Cowboys to pull it out in a thriller 

The American Fobtball Conference(AFC) title game matches Pittsburgh's 
dominating defense against the San Diego Chargers'baU control running game 
which is led by 250 pound fullback Natrone Means. 

ITie story of the game will be the Steelers defense led by All-Pro linebackers 
Kevin Green and Greg Lloycl up front and Rod Woodson anchoring the NFC's 
best secondary . 

San Diego will counter with a ball control offense and solid defense lead by 






halls, walking to your car, and even 
in your class rooms. Chances are 
you probably don't even notice 
them. Unless, of course, something 
goes wrong. 

"The campus consists of about 

approximately 18,000 lights," Says 

P^ Morick, technician at PBCC, 

and they are my primary func- 

SSnr f I ? Ck ' Wh ° has been ^ th 
PBCC for eleven years, is in charge 

of every light (including emergency 

and exit lights), timer, and clock 

on campus. This is a veiy impor- 

K2L J0 £ aad il is a J' ob Mo ^ ick 

takes very seriously. "My main 
responsibility Is making / ure n 
the parking lot lighting works, as 
well as the indoor lighting. I also 
make sure all the clocks 8 are set 
correctly. I have to do a quarterly 

l1 i SV l C }uV n evei y bull ding and 
check the batteries in all the clocks 
twice a year. Sometimes I get help, 
because this is a very big job " 




Danny Morick 



"My boss, Ken Nida, is my driv- 
ing force," he says. "He gives me 
my priorities. I get maybe 5 to 20 
work orders a day as far as lights." 
But his responsibility does not end 
there. Morick works nights, which 
means that he comes in at 2:00pm 
and usually doesn't get off work 
until after 10:30 aL night. The rest 
of the physical plant goes home at 




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4 o'clock, so "anything that hap- 
pens after four I have to handle," 
states Morick. "Any kind of physi- 
cal plant catastrophe, I would take 
care of." 

You would think that watching 
out for 18,000 lights, 250 clocks, 
and timers for each would be 
enough responsibility for Morick. 
Guess what. It isn't. Morick is also 
in charge of maintaining all the 
lights and technical equipment in 
the Duncan Theater. "That's prob- 
ably the scary part," admits Morick. 
"You have to climb into the rafters 
and you have to use a belt to hang 
yourself from the girders." Al- 
though, Morick explained, you're 
not free hanging. You hold on to a 
steel girder! the belt is there in 
case you fall. The girders are ap- 
proximately 100 feet up, and the 
scariest part about being up there, 
says Morick, is removing a light 
and being able to see straight down. 
The big question about this job 
is heights. Being anywhere from 40 



feet to 100 feet in the air would be 
enough to make some people whim- 
per with fear. But, says Morick, "The 
heights don't scare me. I kind of like 
it. The hardest part is having to 
work over your head." 

So, the next time you're walking 
down a hall or walking to your car at 
night and there is a light overhead 
shining brightly. Say thank you 
that there is someone out there to 
make it possible. 




For return of 



Lost Key Ring 



Keys lost in or around Business 
Administration mens room 

NO QUESTIONS ASKED 

CALL BILL AT 688-0484 



FINAL COPY 



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Page 4 



the BEACHCOMBER January 1 8, 1 995 



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the Beachcomber 




Best and Worst -A look at Fall '94. 



By D.S.ULLERY 
Entertainment Editor 

Here we axe at the beginning of 
a brand new year, and what better 
way to herald such a time than by a 
look back at the films that caught 
our attention over the past five 
months. So, without further hesita- 
tion here is a quick glimpse at the 
best and the worst of Fall 1994. 



D.S. Ullery writes an editoral that ask you to Stop 
and Think!!! Seepages 




"Dumb and Dumber" - Jim Carrey 
and Jeff Daniels prove that dumb 
comedy can still work. See review 
this issue. 

"Clear and Present Danger" - what 
can you say about Harrison Ford, 
except that he hasn't made a bad 
movie in 
about eight 
years. This is 
no excep- 
tion, a film 
that is easily 
the best in 
the Tom 
Clancy adap- 
tation series. 

" W e s 
Craven's 
New Night- 
mare" 
Wow!! Scary, 
Erthought- 
q provoking 
2 and just one 
g hell of a good 
>, thriller, this 

n piece of fan- 
es f ,. 
■g tastic cin- 

_ ema is even 



- a definite disappointment from the 
man who stunned us with "The 
Player". Save for a surprise ending 
(men, get ready to squirm in your 
seats), this movie lacks enough life 
to be considered one of Robert 
ALtman's better films. 

"Interview With The Vampire"- okay, 
okay. If your through gagging in 
disbelief, let me explain. Brad Pitt is 
great. Tom Cruise, however, is noth- 
ing more than a modern day Ameri- 
can attempting to act like a regal 
character. No sparks, just a lot of 
great sets and gratuitous violence. 
Come to think of it, I wasn't all that 
jazzed about the source novel, ei- 
ther. 

"The Santa Clause" - Tim Allen is 



okay in his cinematic debut, but the 
movie itself is rather dull. It defi- 
nitely didn't deserve the raging suc- 
cess it has enjoyed at the box office. 
Good overweight effects, though. 

"The Pagemaster" - Leonard Nimoy 
passed on "Generations" because it 
had too few lines for his character. 
Instead, he signed on for this dismal 
failure. Good move, Leo, This is a 
piece of animated garbage that 
thought (foolishly) that it was going 
to challenge "The Lion King" for fam- 
ily film supremacy. Wrong!! To beat 
"The Lion King" requires a few ele- 
ments that this film doesn't possess 
- like a good plot, lively animation, 
life, hope, etc. Definite pass. 

And that's the best and the worst 
of Fall '94. Until spring, I hope to see 
you at the movies. 



Jomedian Tim Allen stars in The Santa Clause 



The BEST: 

"Pulp Fiction" - Travolta makes a 
comeback in this dazzling foray into 
the collective lives of thieves and 
hitmen. Alternately bloody and hi- 
larious, this is a powerful, enrap- 
turing look at the common link be- 
tween the people who comprise the 
underworld. A must see. 

"Ed Wood" - Tim Burton presented 
us with this amazing examination of 
the life of the worst filmmaker in 
history. Very endearing, this is the 
film that will earn Martin Landau 
his much deserved Oscar for his 
affecting performance as Bela 
Lugosi. Johnny Depp is equally 
stunning as the title character. 

"Generations"- Trekkers loved this 
movie, and it's easy to see why. The 
Next Generation crew gets an ap- 
propriate cinematic send-off in this 
high-tech, action-packed addition 
to the Trek mythos. Highly recom- 
mended. 



better than the original (something 
I'd never thought I'd say). Craven 
and company prove that Freddy 
Krueger is still evil enough to be 
really frightening, though fans of 
the later "Elm Street" films need to 
be warned - this time, the jokes are 
out the door. This Krueger is single- 
minded and vicious. Work like this 
is what earned Craven his well- 
earned spot as a valued horror di- 
rector. An almost perfect film. 
And Now.... 

The WORST: 

"Mixed Nuts" - if Steve Martin makes 
another movie this lame, his career 
will be over. There's really nothing 
funny about the lives of people who 
run a suicide hotline, and the lame 
attempts at humor herein prove it. 
Ranks with Martin's equally ex- 
ecrable The Lonely Guy." 

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A^DSUG STORIS 



Actor Robert Englund paints a recurring nightmare in Wes Craven's 
New Nightmare 

Carrey, Daniels Get Belly Laughs in "Dumber." 

By D.S.ULLERY 
Entertainment Editor 

It's not easy to portray a genuinely stupid 
character in a movie and Jim Carrey does it with 
ease. His endless collection of goofy faces and 
superhuman ability to twist and shape his body to 
seeminglysimpossible angles have been honed and 
refined to a point where, for this young star, slap- 
stick is no longer a form of comedy but a state of 
being. 

But that isn't the amazing element in "Dumb 
and Dumber" that really sparks the comic fire and 
makes this film such a pleasure. Oh, Carrey is 
hilarious, his performance here easily ranks up 
therewith "Ace Ventura/'But the real treasure is the 
entirely unexpected performance that co-star Jeff 
Daniels turns in. 

Daniels is one of my all time favorite actors. 
Having proven himself as a fine dramatic actor in 
"Terms of Endearment," and as a perfect leading 
man in the stellar "Arachnophobia," Daniels has 
made my personal list of the top ten most underused 
assets in the industry. 

Here, he demonstrates a gift for physical com- 
edy that he's never indicated before. Daniel's char- 
acter in this movie is every bit as funny as Carrey's, 
and as a result their pairing seems not only natural! 
but inspired. 

The plot in "Dumb and Dumber" is all but. 



invisible. Idiot Carrey finds a beautiful woman's 
briefcase and convinces idiot Daniels to trek with 
him across the country to Aspen so they can return 
it to her. See anything familiar here? Go back about 
thirty years and you have the basic ingredients for 
one of the Bing Crosby/Bob Hope road 
pictures/That's all there is to it. The entire movie is 
a catalogue of all the truly stupid misadventures 
these two morons manage to wrap themselves up in. 
And make no mistake - these are not two misunder- 
stood underdogs. These guys are really, really stu- 
pid. 

The charm of "Dumb and Dumber" is that it 
never once strays from this basic formula and as a 
result it is never presumptuous enough to pretend 
to be more than it actually is. The movie is directed, 
acted and produced as nothing more and nothing 
less than a gut busting, gross-out comedy. It & 
calculated to make you laugh (not to mentiongroan) 
as many times as possible in its one hour and forty 
minute running lime. And judging from the high 
number of honest belly-laughs that this film got out 
ofme, I'd saythat"Dumb and Dumber" is even better 
than the people who made it could have hoped. . 

(By the way, for the curious, Jeff Daniels is 
'Dumb,' and Jim Carrey is 'Dumber.') 



January 18, 1995 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 5 



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the Beachcomber 




JASON'S AIMLESS INSIGHTS 



By Jason Wilkeson 
Features Editor 

This issue of the Beachcomber marks the 
beginning of the new year, the start of a new 
semester, and a- changing of the guard with 
our new Editor-in-Chief, Jim Stravino. It 
also marks my return to the Beachcomber 
after a year hiatus. No, I wasn't in prison, as 
many of my collegues here may have con- 
cluded (the donkey survived with only minor 
injuries, so I wasn't convicted - 1 won't elabo- 
rate) . I just needed some time away to collect 
my thoughts, a chance to refuel my creative 
fires, so to speak. I knew that the time was 
right for me to return when I learned that Jim 
had taken the helm of this supertanker of 
information we call the Beachcomber. He is 
a valiant and intrepid leader, a man of iron 
will and courage. I know that under his wise 
and determined guidance, this paper will 
reach new heights in excellence. And believe 
me, I'm not just saying this because I am 
planning to try to squeeze more scholarship 
money out of him at the end of the term. 

This column usually adresses a single 
subject, then bludgeons that subject to death 
with billy clubs of comic wit. This one, 
however, will deal with many current hap- 
penings, mostly due to the fact that I have 
been saturated with so many MTV-style com- 
mercials, movies, and television shows lately 
that my attention span is virtually non- 
existent, much like President Clinton's re- 
election chances. So here is an overview of 
the things that are affecting our lives, shap- 
ing our future, or just plain bugging the crap 
out of me: 
Republicans in Congress 

Maybe it's just me, but isn't anyone 
else bothered by the fact that our new 



Intramural survey asks students what they would 

like at PBCC Central Campus. 

______ See page 6 



Speaker of the House, Newt Gingrich, is 
named after a lizard? I guess it sort of bal- 
ances things with our new Senate leader Bob 
Dole, who is a lizard, or at least some member 
of the cold-blooded reptile family. 
The Simpson Trial 

Ok, before you moan at the prospect of more 
O.J. coverage, hear me out. I didn't really want 
to mention him, but federal law mandates that 
all media, written or broadcast, must make 
mention of the Juice constantly or face stiff 
penalties. Sure, I'm exaggerating, but it won't 
seem so far fetched once the trial begins. The 
only concern that I have in this whole mess is 
that of Nordberg. Nordberg, as you may recall, 
is the hapless and abused character played by 
Simpson in the "Naked Gun" movies. I am a big 
fan of those movies. I worry that if he is 
convicted, I will no longer feel the same good 
natured pity I felt when Nordberg was folded in 
half by his hospital bed or ran over by a Grey- 
hound bus. Rather, I'll feel empty and wishing 
that they had tortured him more. 
A Sad Loss 

If .you read the Palm Beach Post comic 
page, you have undoubtedely noticed that The 
Far Side is gone, due to the untimely and 
downright painful retirement of Creator Gary 
Larson (the word "creator" is capitalized to 
denote that in my mind, Larson is a god). The 
Post filled the space left by Larson with 
Marmaduke, which is like replacing 60 Min- 
utes with Barney and Friends. The worst part 
is that we still have to see Sylvia every day. The 
woman who makes that comic (and I use the 
term loosley) should have retired long ago, if 
there were justice in the world, which there 
isn't. I wish the best for Larson, which means 



I wish him to return to cartooning. I don't think 
he realizes how much he has helped warp the 
minds of an entire generation and that without 
him, we are lost in a mire of Beetle Bailey and 
Family Circus. 
Super Sunday 

I don't have any predictions as to what teams 
will make it to the Super Bowl in Miami, other than 
saying THE STEELERS RULE!! Ok, that's a pretty 
strong statement, but I'm from Pittsburgh. So sue 
me. 

Well, that's about all I have to say for now, so I'd 
like to conclude by inviting anyone out there to send 
me comments or questions that I can adress in 
future columns. You can drop them off at the 
Beachcomber office, which is located In the Con- 
tinuing Education building. I would appreciate all 
letters, mostly because it saves me from thinking all 
of this stuff up by myself. 



Stop and Think!!! 

Editorial by.D.S. Ullery 
Entertainment Editor 

I have a job other than the 
position that I hold here at the 
Beachcomber. It is a service job, at 
a local cinema (no surprise to any- 
one who reads my work), and I 
rather enjoy it. 

My managers are okay, the pay 
is adequate, and for the most part, 
the job isn't too challenging (this 
last being a requiremnt for those of 
us who write). 

Apparently, there is an unwrit- 
ten law that states that it is neces- 
sary to blame the people behind 
the concession stand for every 
problem in the theater or in a 
patron's personal life. In the past 
month, I have taken more abuse 



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from bad tempered, foul-mouthed 
miscreants in that theater than I 
did in four years of high school. 

What amazes me is that I have 
seen some of these people in other 
places of work. One young woman 
who apparently equated getting ex- 
tra butter on her popcorn with 
finding the cure for cancer read me 
the riot act for being a lousy em- 
ployee. The truth is, she did get her 
extera butter, but simply wasn't 
satisfied, and made three return 
trips to the concession stand be- 
fore I finally had to drown the stuff. 
I didn't think she liked it soggy, 
but I was mistaken. Hey, sue me. 
I'm human. 



The amazing part is that two 
days earlier, the same woman had 
given me attitude from her position 
as a cashier at a local Winn-Dixie 
store. She had literally screamed at 
me that I would have to wait for her 
to go back into stock and retrieve a 
new carton of cigarettes to give me a 
pack. Actually, I hadn't pressured 
her at all, and was simply recieving 
the brunt of a full day of aggrava- 
tion. However, when she came to me 
with an equally nasty temper in the 
theater, I was courteous and polite, 
as we are supposed to be. 

My point is this. We are trying. If 
you're coming into the theater off of 
a shift in a similar type of job, then 



you should hangyour head in shame 
for screaming at the employees when 
you yourself hate being treated that 
way. And for those of you who have 
never worked in jobs like that, I say 
back off. We're often understaffed 
and overworked, and the fact that 
we can do this hour after hour with- 
out leaping across the counter and 
body-slamming patrons into the 
tile floor is a testament to our 
resliency under pressure. So the 
next time you decide to bring your 
anger into a theater, a supermar- 
ket, or a fast-food restaurant con- 
sider that you are dealing with a 
human being. In short - STOP AND 
THINK!!! 



Tirec!; &_aI*«D Wof*Bi I*!£i!rli!©i«!£e 



AIIIHTIONS 

5im men anil t w«niiei3„ Ages 'IS til fill. 

Young men who want the fun of appearing on stage, but without the responsibility of 
learning a lot of lines are invited to attend auditions on January 30 or 31 at 7:30 pm at the 
Playhouse. The comedy hit, a mixture of STASIS and t¥t«sii*ti«* a » Navy, is a gutsy, lusty, 
yet sentimental story about some brawling seamen on a rust-bucket in WWII. The play 
won the Pulitzer Prize. Scripts are available for 3 day check out at the Box Office. The 
director is Maureen Denver. The production is scheduled for April 21- May 7. 

IWistiH* lteliei*1:s 



tosr Tlxoaaara Hegrgren & croeliua itosr&xi 



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Page 6 



the BEACHCOMBER January 1 8, 1 995 



j ure u tm mwnkaam 



January 18, 1995 



the BEACHCOMBER 



CPORTC 

Ik. W the Beachcomber |L W 



Be There! Panther Basketball is in 
high gear. 

by SHIREBN MOHAN 
Staff Reporter 

Palm Beach Community 
College(PBCC) mens' basketball 
team practiced long and hard com- 
ing into the '94-'95 season. They 
began in early October with the help 
and guidance of their coach Scott 
Pospichal, and they haven't slowed 
down since. The season began the 
first week of November at the Ml- 
ami/Dade-North Community 
College's Tipoff Tournament. The 
Panthers won both games they 
played, starting the season off with 
a 2-0 record. 

Now, two months later, the road 
has been treacherous, but the team 
proudly holds a 10-7 record with 
two months of competition still left. 
One can easily say that hard work 
has made it all happen, but other 
factors have to be added, like team 
work and the influence of an experi- 
enced and highly praised coach. 

Coach Pospichal's predictions of 
players who would have a great sea- 
son is also paying off. Alex Kuehl, 
Marquis Wright, Alex Thompson, 
and Kelvin McClendon have all been 
enj oying an exceptional season. Alex 
Kuehl (35) had an average of 14.5 
points for the four games from De- 
cember 7 through January 9, all of 
which the team has won. Marquis 
Wright (3), the team's captain, aver- 
ages almost 24 points. Alex Thomp- 
son (22) has accumulated an aver- 
age of 13 points in the same period. 
KelvinMcClendon (33), however, has 
stolen the spotlight averaging an 
incredible 30 points. McClendon, 




Alex Thompson provides some 
excitement in a Panther victory 

who transferred here from the Uni- 
versity of South Carolina, has been 
the high scorer in most of the games. 
In the game the team played Janu- 
ary 9 the Panthers won by a score of 
107-57 against Rhode Island Com- 
munity College. 

The mens basketball team has a 
lot of spirit and a lot of drive, but lack 
of encouragement from those who 
should be supporters can rid them 
of that. For the team to succeed, 
PBCC students and sports fans need 
to get behind the team by attending 
games and showing them that what 
they are doing on the court is being 
recognized. The team will respond 
to your being there and you will 
have the excitement of watching 
some of the best basketball around. 



It's off to Miami 



Go Chargers!!! 



Superbowl XXIX/ From page 3 

Junior Seau and Leslie O'Neal. It will not prove enough to overcome Pittsburgh 
in the Steelers 24-10 victory. 

From there, it's on to Miami and Super Bowl XXIX where the AFC tries to put 
an end to 10 Years of NFC domination. The League's top two defenses battle as 
Dallas and Pittsburgh meet in the Super Bowl for a third time. To the winning 
franchise goes an NFL record fifth Super Bowl title. The Steelers with plenty of 
defense ,but not enough offense fall as Dallas threepeats 24-14 



Are you interested in playing 



iBecioeeiR! 



Practices 

held Tues. & Thursday 

from 3:00 — 5:00 p.m. 

Saturday 10 — noon 



Men's and 
women's teams 



Field is on southside of PBCC 
Central Campus adjacent to 6th avenue 



OPEN TO ALL PBCC STUDENTS 
FACULTY AND STAFF 




NAME 



ADDRESS 



CE NTRAL CAMPUS 

INTRAMURAL 
SPORTS SURVEY 



TELEPHONE NUMBER. 
CITY-ZIPC0DE__ 



Please indicate in order of preference the top three Intramural sporting activities 
in which you are most interested in participating. 

Please use: 1. For activity you are most interested in. 

2. Second choice. 

3. Third choice 

Note: Persons with little or no experience are encouraged to participate in the activity of their choice. 



Aerobics 

Archery 

Basketball (Regular) 

Basketball (3 on 3) 

Bowling 

Pool 

Racquetball 

Softball 

Tennis 

Track & Field 

(write In activity of interest) 
(write In activity of Interest) 



Brain Bowl 

Swimming 

Volleyball 

Baseball 

Soccer 

Board Games 

Table Tennis (Ping Pong) 

Flag Football 

Badminton 

Turkey Trot 



(write In activity ol Interest) 
(write in activity of Interest) 



RETURN COMPLETED FORM TO STUDENT ACTIVITIES 



Edward M. Eissey serves as PBCC president, and the College is governed by 
the Palm Beach Community College Board of Trustees. 



An Equal Opportunity Institution 



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Page 7 



Tuition Cost on Rise While Loan Dollars Lagging 



Tuition / From Front Page 



source of the largest amount of aid, averaging 
$3,155 for just more than 3 million students 
borrowing to attend class. Other sources of aid 
included Federal Pell Grants (averaging $1,375 
for 1 4 percent of students) , fellowships and schol- 
arships (averaging $2,467 for 12 percent, college 
work study(averaging $1,560 for 4 percent) and 
the GI Bill or other programs (averaging $2,503 
for 2 percent). 

Assistance from employers was the most 
popular source of income for students ($3.6 
million or 18 percentjbut averaged just $979 per 
student, the report found. 

The Census Report also revealed men aver- 
aged $2,953 in assistance compared to $2,89 1 for 
women. Men also received more in terms of 
scholarships, averaging $2,971 compared to 
$2,068 for women. African-American students, 
meanwhile, had the highest proportion of stu- 
dents getting some sort of financial help (58 
percent and averaging $2927). Fifty percent of 
white students obtained aid averaging $2,927. 

Despi te the burgeoning need.federal loan pro- 
grams have remained flat in recent years.with 
students receiving less in Federal Pell Grants and 
other aid. 

As millions of students face whopping college 
costs, and another 12.5 million struggle to pay off 
a collective$41 .9 billion worth of college debt, one 
16-year-old Illinois high school sophmore sought, 
and received, the notice of President Clinton. 
Arthur Orkisz, an A-plus honor student ranked 
number one in his class in Elk Grove, feared he 
wouldn't be able to attend a high-priced univer- 
sity such as Harvard or Stanford. In a letter given 
to Clinton in October, he urged the president to 
find a way to allow students with good grades to 
attend the colleges of their choice. The reason.he 
wrote.is that his father, a machinist and his 
mother, a maintenance worker, can't afford the 
tuition. 

"The cost of college is a pretty pervasive 
concern among high school students," says 

"There is a huge disparity with 
the amount of aid available" 

— Laura McClintock 
Legislative Director U.S. Student Association 

Orkisz's English teacher Mary Johannesen. She 
had assigned 90 students to write letters to the 
president on any topic. Shethen delivered the 
letters to the White House when attending the 
30th reunion of the president's "Hot 
Springs,Ark. .high school class because her mother- 
was his classmate. 

Twenty-five percent of her students wrote of 
college tuition fears. "Sophmores are pretty con- 
cerned," she says. 'The seniors have pretty much 
given up. They figure since they can't afford the 
colleges of their choice, they won't even apply. A 
common attitude is Til wait and work awhile and 
see what happens.' It's pretty depressing." 

Clinton quoted a paragraph from Orkisz's 
letter at a press conference and cited his efforts to 
improve the educational loan system so far, in- 
cluding a student loan program enacted by Con- 
gress in 1 993 that has helped more than 330,000 
students. The program extends college loans to 
students and gives students more options on 
paying back their loans. In additions to paying a 
fixed- dollar amount over 10 years, now students 
also have the option of earning loan repayment 
money with a community service jobor can choose 
to kick in a percentage of their income over the 
loan's life. "I feel we have made it easier for 
students... by reorganizing the student loan pro- 
gram, enabling students to repay their loans on a 
flexible basis and choose jobs without undue 
concern for repayment schedules," Clinton wrote 
back to Johannesen's class. " Students are also 





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able to exchange public service for education^ 
funding by participating in Americorps. This pro- 
gram pays up to $4,725 a year for up to two years 
for college tuition, or repays college loans-in 
return for comunity service work. By years end, 
20,000 paid volunteers will participate. 

Still, Clinton's student loan reforms do not 
receive high praise from everyone. Laura 
McClintock, legislative director for the United 
States Student Association, says she would give 
the Clinton Administration a C-plus for its ef- 
forts. 

For example, a new repayment option ap- 
proved July 1, 1994 allows low- and middle- 
income students who borrowed loans directly 
from the government to reduce their monthly 
loan repayments by extending the amount of time 
in which they can repay loans. 

In the past, no matter how much students 
earned after graduation, they repaid their gov- 
ernment-backed loans on a standard 10-year 
plan. Under Clinton's new program of income- 
contingent loans, some students could have their 
monthly loan payments spread out over a much 
longer period and cut their monthly payments by 
half. This should reduce the number of graduates 
who abandon their school loans, says Clinton 
administration officials, which in turn should 
save the government hundreds and thousands in 
bad debt annually. 

However, McClintock and some college officials 
were alarmed at some of the plan's details arguing 
that monthly loan payments are dropped so low it 
could actually hurt students because many will be 
lured into paying school loans for as long as 25 
years. McClintock says those extra years of com- 
pounding interest will mean students could wind 
up doubling or tripling college cost. "Once students 
are given the option of low monthly payments, many 
will grab it," she says. 

Terry Hartle, vice president for government 
relations at the American Council on Education, 
agrees. He supported a successful inflight by leading 
college organizations to have the U.S. Department of 
Education Increase the annual repayment rate from 
what was originally a lower formula. 



Call l-8®$-385-®£» 



Palm Beach Community College 
Monthly Crime Statistics By Campus 
Months: January - December Year 1994 

Central Etssey South Glades Total 
1 .Homicide O Q Q_ 



2. Sex Off. 



3. Robbery 



4.Aggravated - 
... Assault 



5. Burglary 
/Breaking 
and Entering 



10 



6. Larceny 
/Theft Off. 



31 



7.Motor Vehicle 

Theft 



8. Liquor Law 
Violations 



9. Drug Abuse 
Violations 



10. Weapon Law 
Violations 



2 

3 

~6~ 



Statistics arc compiled at Central Campvis from the monthly reports 
of each campus )\11\94 



Still, mere are several key issues that college 
organizations hope to work with the government, 
including limiting the tax liability borrowers may 
face. Underincome contigent repayment, borrowers 
who faithfully pay on their loans for 25 years and still 
owe some amount would have the rest of their debt 
forgiven but would have to claim this amount, as 
income. 

In addition to the new repayment options, stu- 
dents still have the current ten year repayment 
option and can pay for their loans at any time. They 
can even switch in and out of die array of live-loan 
repayment options currently available. 

As for a Clinton proposal to have the IRS collect 
student loans, proponents say repayment could be 
made easier if borrowers paid off their loans through 
withholdings from their paychecks. McClintock and 
others feel the IRS customer service record gives 
ample reason to reject the plan. 

McClintock also says that despite the creation of 
direct lending, an income contingent repayment 
option and Americorps, students are still finding 
that tuition rates are on the rise while the amount of 
loan dollars availible has been lagging. 

Ferderal appropriations for education have 
shamefully decreased in the last fewyears, she says. 
"There is a huge disparity with the amount of aid 
available," says McClintock. 

Education experts warn that sizeable student 
debt could have ugly social and economic side 
effects. They fear students may avoid teaching, 
social work and graduate school because they don't 
believe they will be able to pay off their loans. 
Educational researchers Joseph Boyd and Carol 
Wennerdahl questioned 551 recent, debt-laden col- 
lege graduates and discovered six in ten said they 
had troubles paying back their student loans. More 
than 25 percent said their debt has caused them to 
live with family or relatives and 35 students said 
their debt caused them to postpone needed health 
care. 

Palo Alto, California., economist Richard 
Carlson, who helped set up the first federally 
guaranteed loan program 25 years ago, agrees 
that the degree of student debt today will change 
the pattern of choices of majors and occupa- 
tions, despite Clinton's optimism. "And how are 
banks going to handle graduates already with 
big debts buying cars and houses?" he adds. 

It is all enough to have led Dan LeBeau, a 
senior at the University of Wisconsin at 
Stephen's Point, to shoulder a wooden coffin for 
the second mock funeral he's led through col- 
lege campuses in two years to protest climbing 
education costs. LeBeau pointed out that Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin system students now pay 
around 33 percent of their tuition, which is way 
above the rate of inflation, 

"It's hard to be a full time student anymore", 
he says. 



PBGC'S LITERARY JOURNAl 




APOLLO'S LUTE 

1$ NOW 
ACCEPTS W6 SUBMISSIONS FOR ITS 

1994-9S EDITION 

CONTACT DR. CAROLYN MARTIN' AT MAIL 
STATION #47 OR CALL 439-8137. 



Page 8 



the BEACHCOMBER January 1 8, 1 995 



/ 



the Beachcomber 



STRANGE 



^BipiiiliiRi^ 




Are YOU the BEST 

Student in Florida? 



If you're a Florida college student who Tallahassee and will be featured in the special 

supports yourself through school, makes Student of the Year issue of Florida leader, 
superb grades, and is active at your college Applications will be reviewed by a panel 

and inyourcommuniw.thenyoumayhavea of distinguished judges, including former US. 



chance at winning a share 
of more $30,000 in 
priiesinthe 
prestigious 1995 
Florida College Student 
of the Year Award. 

Twenty-three 
students from schools 
throughout the state 
will earn statewide 
media recognition in 
the annual award, not to mention scholar- 
ships and priaa donated by First Union 
National Bank, Winn-Dixie, EDS, Busch 
Gardens, lastpak and more. 

Winners will be announced at an April 
1994 press conference and reception in 




Secretary of Education Tamil Bell, Miami 
Herald Publisher David Lawrence, State 
University System 
Chancellor Charles Reed, 
and Florida CC Director 
Clark Maxwell 
For tMcotim m/o , please 
sendaself'ddTused, 
startup, iiusmeswi$ 
envelope to Florida College 
Student of tlu Year Auora, 
c/o Florida Leadermago^me, P.O. Boot J4Q8J, 
Gomes*, Flu. 32604-2081 . For details, cal 

\jEEE8SB3EP 



f ^mmiuimimmm^ FLORIDA' 

I I»ITSTJUffi«S &&-^^IS0iS: First fal» Hstlsaal tiol 

J tffliMi,lte1ftdill^te,lK.lNtliMM 

I kum 






THEME CROSSWORD VOCABULARY LESSO 



By Trip Payne 

ACROSS 

1 Hand or loot 
8 Plants kisses 
on 
14 Jeremy Irons 
film 

20 Charge of 
wrongdoing 

21 Where 
blackbirds are 
bated: 3 wds. 

22 Revised 

23 Start of a quote 
by Joaquin 
Andujar: 4 wds. 

25 Got cozy 

26 Turf 

27 Short sleeps 

28 Respond 

30 Enthusiastic 
Spanish assent: 
2 wds. 

31 Kind ol religious 



believer 
33 Cave dweller 
35 Follow around 

37 Middling grade 

38 Latin case 
41 Wading bird 
43 Had a feeling 
45 Part 2 of quote: 

3 wds. 

48 Confused: 

2 wds. 

50 Victory goddess 

51 Challenge 

52 David and Max 
54, Part 3 of quote 

57 Nice season 

58 Coward, et al. 

60 Transmits 

61 Shimon — 

62 Guitarist Carlos 
84 Subsequently 

65 Loving touch 

66 Part 4 of quote: 
5 wds. 



70 Star of "Mamie" 

73 Kinds of tests 

74 Suggests: 
2 was. 

78 Wanted-poster 
info. 

79 French pancake 

80 Kind of steak: 
(hyph. wd.) 

82 Lifeguard's 
technique 

83 Part 5 of quote 

84 Singer Bonnie 

85 Cal sound 

86 A piece of cake 

87 Brunch hour: 
2 wds. 

89 Jeff Bagwell 
team: 2 wds. 

93 Cousin on 
"Bewitched" 

95 L, Frank - 

96 Most recent 

97 Assoc. 



100 Lima land 

101 In shape 

102 One of 
Chekhov's 
Three Sisters" 

104 Red planet 
106 Something 

that dims 

gradually 

108 First name? 

109 Mil. add. 
112 Forward, in 

Firenze 

114 End ol quote: 

4 wds. 

119 Go to bed 

120 Buffet heater 

121 Give a claim 
(to) 

122 On the roster 

123 A Lawrence 

124 Western 
topper 



DOWN 

I Doilies 
2 -chamber 

3 Served a 
winner 

4 Big— , Calif. 

5 Avail oneself of 

6 Monaco Prince 

7 Maxwell, et al. 

8 Coal containers 
90ne:Fr. 

10 Carpenter's tool 

11 Olympic event 

12 Ireland 

13 Solemn 

14 Molar menders 

15 Summer drink 

16 Come up short 

17 Garret 

18 Flock members 

19 Actor Murphy 
24 — illusion 

29 Artificial 
waterways 



31 Roosevelt's 
coin 

32 First lady? 

33 Nibble 

34 Pallor 

36 "— Miserables" 

38 Eats supper 

39 Actress Ekberg 

40 Occupied 

42 Watering holes 

43 Slop a flow 

44 Former Mormon 
territory 

46 Epitome 

47 CIA employees 
49 Swiss river 

53 Birth of a 
notion? 

55 "I agree!" 

56 Draft-card 
issuers: abbr. 

58 Thurmond et al. 

59 "Chestnuts 

Roasting 

Open Fire" 

60 Move sneakily 



61 Soft velvet 

63 Angry speeches 

64 — attention 
(become alert) 

65 Make a new 
phrase 

67 Aclress Petty 

68 The Queen of 
Soul 

69 Prickle 
70"Hee— " 

71 "Xanadu" band 
72 Juicy gossip 

75 Curl one's hair 

76 Lhasa — (dogs) 

77 Illicit meeting 

79 "Candid -" 

80 Bishop 
Desmond 

81 Old saw 

84 Exalted 

85 Teenager's test: 
abbr. 

86 Singer James 
88 Soviet program, 

once: abbr. 



90 Where?: Lat. 

91 Bit of food 

92 — Diego 

94 Belief of some 
colonists 

97 Sharif, et al. 

98 "Bolero" 
composer 

99 Persona non 

101 Young chicken, 

perhaps 
103 Rants 
105 Fit of anger 
107"Como- 

usted?" 

108 Shortly 

109 Picnic spoilers 

110 Marco — 

111 Novelist Wister 
113 Three: It. 

115 Food leaving 

116 Dimensional 
start 

117 USPS path 

118 First-aid - 




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9 1994 United Feature Syndicate 



DILBERT® by Scott Adams 




...AND THAT'S WObd 
"UNITED CHARITY* GAVE 
(At BACK W DIGNITY 
ANY QIJ£5TI0NS 7 f 

HOW DO YOU 
5HOC0 UP ON A 
HEADCOUNT 
REPORT? 




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Talk to a Friendly 
Tarot Psychic and 
Learn the Secrets 
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Your Innermost Questions Answered 
Live • Private • Totally Confidential 

1-900-476-9700 ea 317 

$2.99/min. Avq. call 12 min. Avg, cost per callSM 

Must be over 18*Touch Tons phone required 
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Madness is upon us and John Car- 
penter bring it to you. D.S. Ullery 
reveiws in the "Mouth of Mad- 



ness. 



w 



See page 4 



fbtida- Community Cdkgt 
Tress Association 

1993 BF ST DESIGN 

THIRD PLACE/STATE OF FLORIDA 



r 

With the Simpson Trial full steam 
Robert Wimfoerly asks the ques- 
tion truth, justice or the american 

wa y* See page 5 



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THE STUDENT VOICE OF PBGC 



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Volume 55 Number 5 



PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE ♦ LAKE WORTH, FLORIDA 



February 15, 1995 



PBCC STUDENT SOON TO BE IN-LINE WORLD CHAMPION 







Santiago Blandon stands by the flag of El 
Salvador 



By Jarod Turner 
Sports Editor 

His name is Santiago Blandon. He is from El 
Salvador and he is one of the world's best in- 
line speed skaters. He is also a student here at 
Palm Beach Community College(PBCC). His 
desire to be the very best in the sport of in-line 
speed skating has made him an incredible 
athlete as well as an incredible person. 

Santiago Blandon came to the United States 
in 1980, speaking absolutely no English. Now, 
1 5 years later he is one of the world's best in- 
line skaters. One of the most amazing things 
about this great athlete is that he only started 
skating four years ago. Since (hat. time he has 
produced some truly incredible results. 

In 1991 and '92, Blandon went to the Junior 
Olympics and competed in the Southern Re- 
gion Championships. In 1993, he went to the 
National's and made the finals. In that same 
year, Blandon went to the World Champion- 
ships where he came in second. At the cham- 
pionships, he finished in the top 10 in the 300 
meter competition, top 10 in 20,000 meters and 
top 10 overall in the world. What made these 
accomplishment truly amazing was that 
Blandon was racing against four-man teams all 
by himself. Because the country of El Salvador 



is a rather poor one, they do not have the 
resources to fund a national in-line skating 
team. Blandon decided to start his very own one 
man skating team. 

In 1994, Blandon .suffered what he consid- 
ered to be an off year. He stated that "outside 
Influences" such as school and physical inju- 
ries kept him from getting the training that he 
needed to compete at the National and World 
Class level. Although he had had a rough year 
in '94, he Is quite confident that this year will be 
a very exciting one for him. 

Blandon is not only a great athlete, but a 
great person. He says that he wants to be a role 
model to young people and get them to be the 
very best that they can be in athletics as well as 
in life. His desire to be a role model has led him 
to become a physical education major here at 
PBCC. Blandon says that two of his role models 
are from this campus. One is instructor Steve 
Brahlek, and the other is Max Faquir, physical 
education teacher. His plans are to graduate 
from PBCC and possibly move on to Palm Beach 
Atlantic College to receive his bachelor's degree 



Blandon/See page 6 



Interaction: A Conversation with Dr. Mitchell Kass 



Svizette Rios 
News Reporter 

For five and a half years, Dr. 
Mitchell Kass has walked down 
the same halls, eaten in the same 
cafeteria, and shared the same 
concerns as the rest of the PBCC 
students. 

"I enjoy working here," he says, 
adjusting a pair of round yuppie 
glasses. "I like to be involved with 
the students outside of the 
classroom. . .1 have always liked the 
idea of students being able to par- 



Panther baseball is off 
to a great start 

See page 6 



ticipate in school on a social level 
as well as an academic level." 

For that reason, Dr. Kass has 
held the spot of faculty advisor for 
the Student Government Associa- 
tion (SGA) for the past two years, 
and the sparkle in his eyes when 
he speaks reveals his pride in their 
accomplishments. He is especially 
proud of the association's partici- 
pation in the Florida Junior Col- 
lege Student Government Asso- 



ciation (FJCSGA), an organization 
that lobbies in Tallahassee for the 
needs of college students. 

"Students have always come to 
us [teachersl when their lives are 
notgoingwell,"hesays. And so, by 
being the Advisor of SGA, he can 
branch out and reach more stu- 
dents that just those in his classes. 

Dr. Kass' life has not been con- 
fined to simply teaching. Before he 
began this career, he was a detec- 



tive at the District Attorney's office 
in Kings County, New York. He 
received his master's degree in 
Criminal Justice from Long Island 
University, and a doctorate in So- 
ciology from CUNY Graduate 
School in New York. As he lived 
and learned, however, a greater 
need to reach out to people began 
to develop, and it led him to a 

Kass/See page 3 



Remembering Guillermo: How One World-Class Athlete Inspired Me 



By Santiago Blandon (World Team El Salvador) 
ivith Robert Wimberly 
Staff Reporter 

I remember the first time I met Guillermo, 
a.1 the '93 World Championships in Colorado 
Springs one Sunday before practice. He just 
sat down next to me and introduced himself, a 
ha.ndshake and a smile and a lot of qxjestlons; 
who I was, where I was from, how I was doing. 
He asked me if I had some wheels I could lend 
txirn, and then skated away. When, he was 
gone, my friend Alvaro Bernal skated up to me, 
thuderstruck. 

"Do you know who that is?" he asked. Just 
some guy, I thought. He was so down to earth 
and regular, he hardly seemed like someone as 
destined for greatness as he was. 

Alvaro told me the story of how Guillermo 
Botero had won one of the greatest in-line/ 
traditional roller skating titles ever: 

It was the finals of the 20,000 meter Last 
IVtan Out, at the 1990 World Championships in 
Bello-Antioquia. It had been raining all day 
long, so hard that it seemed like the whole sky 
was coming down on us. Everyone was cold, 
escliausted, and soaked to the bone in the final 
lap- We were barely able to see through the 



torrents, Everyone was just trying to finish 
without dropping dead, when Guillermo ilew by 
from out of nowhere. Somehow he had found 
the energy to pass everyone at the finish line. It 
was incredible. He had not only won Columbia's 
first gold medal, but he had also set. a world 
record that still stands to this day. In the 
pouring rain. The ovation lasted almost a half 
hour. I wish I had been there. 

We were at the 1993 world championships 
together. As the games started to roll, I was able, 
to spend time with him and his brother, Jorge, 
and we all became friends. He was always eager 
to help and easy to talk to, and he skated like a 
berzerker; fearlessly and without regard to win- 
ning or losing. 

I didn't make It to the 10,000 meter Point 
Finals, but he did. He was at the back of the 
pack, but when he noticed that some other 
skater was picking on his brother up in front, 
he had caught up by the end of the lap lust to 
punch the guy out. This may not be the best 

Botero/See page 5 



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Page 2 



the BEACHCOMBER February, 15, 1995 



Feburary 15, 1995 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 3 



PDITORMT 

JL**d the Beachcomber A« 



Morality Is A Thing Of The Past 

By Stacey Skinner and D.S.Ullery 

News and Entertainment Editors .,,.,-, T +• «, v,*^,-, 

When was morality flushed down the toilet? I must ye been 
asleep that day because I never saw it coming. It had to have 
happened, though, because the other day when I turned on my 
radio in the hopes of hearing some decent music, I was regaled by 
the most obnoxious, vile piece of so-called music that these ears 
have ever had the dire misfortune to percieve. The song -and 1 
use that term lightly - went something like^this "...don t want no 
teeny-weeny teeny-weeny short short man." 

That was the first encounter with what I like to refer to as the Great 
Artistic Nosedive of 1995. Later that very same evening, I heard an 
explicit version of the same tune, and when I realized that the woman 
singing the lyrics was actually referring to the size of a man's genitalia, 
I pretty much gave up the idea of eating dinner. 

I mean really, do women really allow the size of their partner s gemtals 
to serve as the basis for of a life-long, loving relationship? Sure, we joke 
about it sometimes, but that's just it. It's a joke!! 1 really don't want to 
hear some linguistically challenged tart spend ten minutes crowing 
about how the man she has allowed to take her to bed should crawl away 
in embarrassment because he doesn't meet her (low) personal standards. 
Not only does this negate every moral ethic I've been raised with, but it 
paints a portrait of a woman who is, at heart, completely devoid of basic 
human decency. 

That in itself is not the major problem, however. No, the real crisis is 
that - thanks to the cooperation of radio stations such as Power 96 and 
Star 95.5 - the rest of the world is now privy to this scenario as well. And 
lets not forget the children who listen to these stations almost con- 
stantly- children whose minds are very open to suggestion. What 
happens when they hear words like "don't want no short short man" ? I'll 
tell you what, they'll start to take those words to heart and then America 
as a society will start a nosedive so sharp it will put the Blue Angles to 
shame. 



1994/95 Graduating Scholarship Program 
Deadline March 1, 1995!!! 

There are approximately 40-50 Scholarships available to 
the students who will graduate from PBCC and will have a 
3.0 minimum, cumulative grade point average based on 
merit as well as financial need. 

Stop by the Financial Aid office and pick up 1995X96 Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid(FAFSA) packet you 
must file this before you are eligible for a scholarship. 

Once completing the entire FAFSA you have: 

1. Applied for the Graduating Sophomore Scholarships at 

PBCC 
2. Applied for the 1995X96 Federal Financial Aid Programs 
3.Applied for the 1995X96 Florida Student Assistance Gran 
Financial Aid is located across from 
the cafeteria and caddy corner to the 
Registar's office on the Lake 
WorthtCentral) Campus. 

PHONE: 439-8061 





Autobiographical Essay 

By Maxel Doyle 

Special to the Beachcomber 

This is an autobiography about 
Maxel Doyle III. I was born in Palm 
Beach Gardens Hospital on Janu- 
ary 15, 1982. My mother's name is 
Elizabeth Robinson, she is a single 
parent. My mother was born on 
December 11, 1956. It is very 
interesting where she was born. 
She was born in her grandmother's 
bed in the family home on 5th 
street in West Palm Beach. There 
was no doctor present, just what is 
called a Mid-wife, a person like a 
doctor in those days. I am of me- 
dium height, and weight about 120 
lbs. I am the youngest of all my 
brothers and sisters. I have an 
uncle by the name of Timothy that 
all my family members say I favor, 
but I have never seen him. 

Something very special hap- 
pened to me 3 weeks ago. I became 
an uncle to a baby girl on Septem- 
ber 6, 1994 at 10:21 P.M. She was 
named in honor of my mother, 
Alyshia Elizabeth. Alyshia weighed 
61bs 1 loz. and was 19in. long, and 
her head was 13 1/2 round and 



her chest 19in. round. The reason 
her birth was so special; to me is 
because, I watched her being born. 
Watching the birth of my neice was 
exciting. The first part was nasty, 
but overall it was beautiful. She is 
a beautiful little girl. 

The most significant person in 
my life is my mother. My mother is 
only 5ft 8 1 /2 in. tall but she is the 
strongest woman I ever did see. 
And a testament of that strength is 
the three young men she raised 
alone. 

Well, when I get older I will 
become a doctor. I will be a Re- 
search Scientist researching cures 
for Sickle Cell, Cancer, and AIDS. 
These are just some of the areas I 
plan to study while attending 
Morehouse College in Atlanta 
Georgia. I will go to college on an 
academic scholarship. 

For right now my aim is to get 
good grades and learn as much as 
I can while attending middle school 
at John F. Kennedy Middle School 
in Rivera Beach, Flonida. 



Editor/Layout 
News Editor 
Entertainment Editor 
Features Editor 
Sports Editor 
Advertising Manager 



the B EACHCOMB ER 

— 1993 — 

Florida Community College Press Association 

Award Winners 

— George P. Reis — 

First Place Best Arts Review 

S Second Place In-depth Reporting. 

— Robert G. Gerard — 

Third Place Sports Photo. 

— the Beachcomber (Mike Mitseff) — 

Third Place Design/Layout. 

—1994 — 

Hike Mitseff 

First Place Best Arts Review 



Jim Stravino 

Stacey Skinner 

D.S. Ullery 

Jason Wilkeson 

Jarod Turner 
Judie Casavant 



Contributing Reporters/Photographers 

Santiago Blandon, Suzette Rios, Beth Silver, Maxel Doyle 

Robert Wimberly, Marco Buscaglia, Anthony Ramazo, 

Marsha Skinner 

Opinions expressed in the Beachcomber do not necessarily reflect 
the views of the Beachcomber or Palm Beach Community College. 
Letters to the Editor must be signed. 



Palm Beach Community College 

the BEACHCOMBER 

4200 Congress Avenue 

Lake Worth, FL 33461-4796 

(407) 439-8064 Fax (407) 439-8210 





Dr. Edward M. Eissey 
President/Publisher 



Ms. Vicki Scheurer 
Faculty Adviser 



So here is what we should do. Take back the radio stations that are 
supposedly here to entertain us. Demand that that stupid song not be 
played, or else you and your friends will boycott them. It is the only way 
that we can hope to make the airwaves safer for those among us whose 
minds are still in their formative years. It's time that we made a moral 
stand, people. There is simply no excuse for letting this filth go unno- 
ticed. 



"Career 55 Students Could Pay in 
Arizona 



By Beth Silver 
Special to the Beachcomber 
PHOENIX (CPSLStudents who 
take more classes than their major 
requires may be forced to pay a 
$5,000 penalty under a bill in the 
Arizona State Legislature designed 
to keep perpetual pupils from tak- 
ing up classroom space. 

"We have these people who 
make a hobby out of going to 
school," said the bill's sponsor, 
Rep. Jean McGrath, R-Glendale. "I 
don't think it is incumbent upon 
the state of Arizona to pay for their 
hobby." 

The bill would require in-state 
students taking more than 32 
units_about 10 classes_over their 
major requirement to pay non-resi- 
dent tuition. Resident tuition is 
currently $1,828, and non-resi- 
dent tuition is $7,434. 

Students who exceed the limit 
could appeal, she said. 

But a statewide student lobby- 
ing organization is warning that 
the measure would be devastating 
to those who change their major, 
transfer from another school or get 
a double degree. 

"It will hurt so many students. 
Thousands and thousands go units 
over through no fault of their own," 
said Paul Allvin, Arizona Students' 
Association executive director. 

He also said it could force stu- 
dents to drop out of school if they 
can not afford the higher tuition. 
"A career student is a notori- 
ous student, " he said . 'The amount 
of money to police this is not worth 
changing state law to go after one- 
tenth of 1 percent." 

In-state tuition is subsidized 
by the state. The bill would require 
students with too many credits to 
pay the non-resident rate. 

"Any money we can save the 
taxpayers of the state of Arizona is 
worth it," McGrath said. "I do think 
it would free up funds and free up 



classroom space." 

She said she did not know how 
many students would be affected or 
how much money it would save. 

McGrath said she was unsure 
how the bill would fare since a simi- 
lar one was defeated last year. 

However, she said if it does get 
approved at the capitol, she believes 
the attention given to it will be 
enough to prod the Arizona Board of 
Regents into changing policy them- 
selves. 

"I want to let the regents know 
we will take their problems in hand 
and solve them for them. They need 
to be awakened," McGrath said. 

In last month's regents meeting, 
Regent John Munger urged the 
board to adopt a 160-unlt limit with 
exceptions for returning students, 
double majors and double degrees, 
among others. The regents assigned 
the issue to a committee and are 
expected to hear it again in May. 

"I'm not surprised that this has 
come up in the legislature," Munger 
said. "I have in fact predicted that. I 
think that the regents do need to act 
on my proposal." 

Associated Students of the Uni- 
versity of Arizona President T.J. 
Trujillo said he supports universi- 
ties limiting the number of units 
students take. However, he said he 
did not know how high the limit 
should be. . 

"I think the intent of the bill is 
good, and the fact that is it causing 
some serious consideration at the 
regent level is good," he said. He also 
said he believed the regents should 
deal with the issue, not the legisla- 
ture. to 

The bill's co-sponsor, Senate 
Education Committee Chairma* 
Sen. JohnHuppenthal, R-Chandler, 
said he also is unsure how rtm 
units students should be allowed to 
take. 




A Humanitarian Down to Earth and very Opinionated 



i^^ttiKi^ilMi^P' 



Kass/from Front Page 

career in teaching. In addition to his experi- 
ence here, he has spent fourteen years teaching 
sociology and criminal justice in both New York 
and Florida. 

His favorite aspect of teaching is classroom 
interaction. "College classrooms give students 
the opportunity to discuss issues you don't 
discuss anywhere else," he says. 

According to Kass, the solution to almost 
any of the social problems we have lies in the 
power of an education. More importantly, that 
a proper education be started in the earliest 
stages. Kass feels that inefficiency and impo- 
tence of the government's social policies and 
methods are at the root of the problem the 
education system faces. "Government policies 
are really an answer to the symptoms and not 
the problems. I think that everyone on welfare 
should have at least a high school education. 
That is what will empower people to do better 
for themselves." 

As an example, he points out the lack of 
standards in competency for professionals who 
deal with juvenile delinquents. 'This remains a 
problem because the situation is not being 
controlled by trained professionals. The major- 




Mitchell Kass swears in the SGA secretary in 1994 



ity of the deans in public schools- have little 
training in dealing with these kids, and things 
can only get worse when the people who have to 
deal with a problem do not understand it." 

As a result of these concerns, Kass has also 
gotten involved with the school system itself, 
running for the school board in 1992, and in 
conducting a survey called "Racial Attitudes 
Toward Desegregation Issues, Strategies, and 
Techniques in Palm Beach County", among 
11th and 12th grade students that will be 
completed in April. 

Closer to home, he feels that the problems 
with community colleges come from being 
"grossly underfunded". He wants to see the 
colleges funded more sufficiently, so they can 
focus on making more programs available to 
the students. 

Dr. Kass sees himself as a humanitarian 
above all else, down to earth and very opinion- 
ated. In a perfect future, he sees humanity as 
being "empowered to have more successful 
lives, and this power will come from education." 
He has turned on a switch in the minds of his 
many students, making it clear that he is a man 
who cares. 



ASSISTANT BASKETBALL COACH MAKING A DIFFERENCE 



By Jarod Turner 
Sports Editor 

With the playoffs just around 
the corner for the Palm Beach Com- 
munity College(PBCC) women's 
basketball team, it appears that 
our Lady Panthers are in great 
hands. Not only do they have good 
players, they have a very talented 
coaching staff. One of those tal- 
ented coaches is assistant, Patsy 
Zimmerman. 

Zimmerman, who attended col- 
lege at Santa Fe Community Col- 
lege in Gainsvtile, and later at 
Florida Atlantic University(FAU) in 
Boca Raton, has enjoyed a very 
successful career in coaching bas- 
ketball after playing point guard 
for the institutions named previ- 
ously. Her playing career led her 
to the National Regional Tourna- 
ment in 1989 in which Florida 
Atlantic lost to the eventual #2 
team in the country. Her coaching 



career has been a successful one 
as well. Zimmerman began six 
years ago, coaching at FAU as a 
student assistant and then as a 
graduate student. After she had 
completed her graduate program 
at FAU, Zimmerman moved on to 
become the head Junior Varsity 
coach at Coral Springs High School 
for one year. 

In giving her reasons for want- 
ing to coach Zimmerman stated, "I 
love it, can't get away from it." She 
also said, "I love to win and to work 
with the girls", when explaining 
what she enjoyed most about 
coaching basketball. Among the 
girls that coach Zimmerman en- 
joys working with the most are: 
guards, Latasha McMillan and 
Rhondesha "Bird" Wilkinson, and 
center, Brigitte Gittens, all of which 
are sophomores. Although Zim- 



merman cited these three players 
as her favorites, she stated that 
she "really gets along well with all 
of the girls on the team." When 
asked about wanting to become a 
head coach Zimmerman replied, 
"Sometimes I do, sometimes I don't" 
She said that her reasons for hav- 
ing mixed feelings about being a 
head coach were that she had seen 
both the "ups and the downs" of 
being in that position. * 

Zimmerman's views of the 
team's chances in the playoffs are 
quite clear. "We should definitely 
make it to the state tournament", 
stated Zimmerman. She went on 
to say, "I think everyone in the 
conference knows that we are the 
best team in the conference." Al- 
though their record might not show 
it, Zimmerman's statement is quite 
true. Because some of the girls on 



the team were lost due to grades 
throughout the course of the season, 
they were forced to play several games 
with only five or six players, allowing 
for little or no substitution. Some of 
the games in which the team only 
played with five players were lost by 
only a few points. In the games when 
the team was at full strength, the 
same teams that beat them by a few 
points were blown out quite severely. 
Zimmerman boldly predicted, "Ifthese 
girls show up to play they can win [the 
state tournament)." 

Coach Zimmerman is not only a 
busy woman on the court, but a busy 
one as well off the court. When she is 
not coaching she is usually teaching 
aerobics in Boca Raton or teaching a 
health and fitness class at FAU which 
she has been doing for the past four 

Coach/See page 6 



Thirteen Year Old's Essay Model For English Class 



By Stacey Skinner 
News Editor 

He's thirteen years old, in the seventh grade 
and taking courses that would make a college 
student sweat. His name is Maxel Doyle, and he 
recently had his autobiographical essay pre- 
sented to an english class here at PBCC. 

Doyle's day begins at 7am, normal time for 
any student attending John F. Kennedy Middle 
School, but when the first bell rings at 8:55am, 
Doyle's is no longer your average student. Some 
of the courses he takes on average day are 
honors German, advanced science, math, 
english, and world geography, as well as band 
class. Says Doyle "I have a few" subjects that 
are my favorite, but I would have to say that I 
especially enjoy "all my academic classes. Re- 
ally math and science the most. In science you 
learn stuff about the body and the earth, and 
math, I don't know, it just came to me natu- 
rally." 

And naturally it should since Doyle is hop- 
ing to become an orthopedic surgeon one day. 
I guess that's why I took advanced science, 
Doyle admits. He even acknowledges the fact 
that he watches some of the shows oriented 
toward his field. His favorite show is The Opera- 
tion on The Learning Channel. The Operation 
allows you to witness an actual surgery from 
the first incision to the final stitch. For Doyle, it 
is possibly one of the best shows on television 
today. 

Hnwpvpr all nf that is in rhp fiiturp atifi 



Doyle is concentrating on the present for now. 
His recent essay was shown to a group of 
english students in David Duncan's class. Says 
Duncan, I wanted to show my class that this is 
coming out from younger grades so they need to 
start tightening up because this is college. 
Elizabeth [Robinson] shared the essay with me, 
and coming from a thirteen year old, it was 
better than some of the stuff I saw coming from 
my classes. That's the bottom line. 

"I'm so proud of him, I love him to death," 
said Elizabeth Robinson, Doyle's mother and 
Administrative Assistant here on campus. Doyle 
has two older brothers Enous, 24, and Horice,22. 
Both graduated from high school and are now 
employed as hard labor workers. Says Robinson, 
Horice wants to become a child psychologist 
and Enous wants to be a computer analyst in 
the not- to -distant future, but for now "we're 
focusing on Maxel. . . [He] has great potential. . . [as 
well as] great morals and principals. If egged to 
fight, he would rather discuss it first. He has 
never been in a fist fight." 

Robinson is very proud of her son. He was 
student of the month in October, she boasts 
with a smile, "Everybody likes him. All the kids 
in the [apartment] complex want to play with 
him." .„,, , 

Doyle just thinks of himself as a normal kid. His 
most basic rule is don't break the law, a foun- 



D.S, takes a look at the 
South Florida Fair as 
it comes and goes for 
another year. See page 4 



tion," admits Doyle. "Other than that, I just 
can't explain it." 

Upon graduation from John F. Kennedy, 
Doyle plans to attend Palm Beach Lakes for two 
years and then go to Suncoast to finish off his 
high school education. Why the change? 'To 
get the best of both worlds," Doyle admits. He 
plans to take the same belief with him to 
college.taking two years here at PBCC, two 
years at Moorehouse, and two years at FAMU. 
"I want to go to FAMU to be part of the 'Marching 
Hundred', they have a good unity there. A 
bond." Doyle is part of the concert band at John 
F. Kennedy, he plays the trombone and is the 
leader of the trombone section. Says Doyle, "I 
wanted to play the drums but Mr. Nance, the 
band director, said he didn't have enough trom- 
bones so I went with the trombone instead. 
Next year, though, I want to try out for drum 
major." 

At thirteen, Doyle knows what he wants 
out of life and he knows how to go about 
getting it. Says Robinson, "Maxel has great 
potential. I don't care what he does, but what- 
ever he does," she continues with a laugh, 
"I've told him he has to have a 'Dr.' in front of 
his name." 

All I want out of life, says Doyle is "to grow 
up, be a doctor, see the world, have a nice 
house and family, and take care of my mamma 



Page 4 



the BEACHCOMBER February 1 5, 1 995 



Feburary 15, 1995 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 5 



the Beachcomber 



This Way Lies "Madness 95 - Carpenter Style 



By D.S.ULLERY 
Entertainment Editor 

Back in the Fifties and Sixties, there was an 
advertising gimmick that producers loved to 
use to boost the sales of their horror films. They 
would have a woman dressed as a nurse stand- 
ing in the audience, and there would be a poster 
in front of that theater explaining that a nurse 
was present to aid patrons should they collapse 
from fright during the course of said movie. The 
movie was purpotedly way too scary for anyone 



Get exposed to strange 



See page 8 




John Carpenter directs a scene from his 
psychologial-horror film In the Mouth of 
Madness 

with nervous dispositions, weak constitutuions, 
etc.. I mention this because as the house lights 
came on following John Carpenter's latest film 
"In the Mouth of Madness", it occcured to me 
that such a poster would indeed be appropriate 
for this picture. 

I have witnessed every concievable horror 
that can happen on film. I have attended open- 
ing night viewings of movies ranging from the 
truly pathetic like "Texas Chainsaw Massacre 
2" to the absolutely spellbinding- such as "Si- 
lence of the Lambs." My personal video collec- 
tion is strewn with the stuff of other people's 



nightmares, and quite often I have found myself 
chuckling when others have been scared into 
complete silence. 

I have inserted this personal information 
not for self-gratification, but to drive home a 
point. I do not want any reader to take the 
following remark lightly. "In The Mouth of Mad- 
ness" is one of the scariest films I have ever 
seen. 

Seeing it, I recollected a review that Roger 
Ebert once wrote for John Carpenter's "Hallow- 
een." He said in that critique that if audiences 
didn't want to be really, honestly scared, then 
they should stay way from that movie. 

I agreed. So passionately that until recently, 
"Halloween" held the number one spot as the 
most frightening film experience that I had ever 
lived through. That film is an eighty-five minute 
exercise in sheer palpable terror, a non-stop 
celeberation of every horror that can happen in 
the middle of the night when an inhuman 
monster invades suburbia. 

That place has all changed, and the same 
man is responsible. With this new movie, Car- 
penter reestablishes a fact that many of us 
seem to have forgotten over the past few years: 
When the story is right, the casting is appropri- 
ate and Carpenter is at the helm, the movie you 
are about to watch will probably be with you for 
a long, long time. 

The story in "Madness' goes something like 
this: Insurance investigator John Trent ("Ju- 
rassic Park" star Sam Neill) is hired by a pres- 
tigious publishing firm to track down one of 
their clients, horror novelist Sutter Cane (Jurgen 
Prochnow, who played the supernatural figure 
featured in "The Seventh Sign"). He is accompa- 
nied by Cane's personal PR woman, Linda Styles 
(Julie Carmen). The reason for all of this ado? 
Cane is the best. He outsells every other writer 
in history, and he has in his possesion the only 
copy of his latest book "In the Mouth of Mad- 
ness." 

Trent and Styles follow the writer's trail to 
the small town of Hobb's End. Now, by this time 
I was already on the edge of my seat, as well as 
being intensely embroiled in the plot. Then 
Carpenter dropped his bombshell. You see, 
Hobb's End isn't supposed to exist. It's a town 
that Cane only writes about. 

There's more, much more. And I don't beleive 
that I've given away any of the really nasty 
surprises that this film holds in store for the 
brave of heart. This is a stunning motion pic- 
ture, one that had me so worked up that I was 
prepared to leave the theater before it ended. 
Only my desire to see the conclusion kept me in 
my seat (that plus the fact that I had my date to 
hang onto). The film actually gets that frighten- 
ing. 

Prochnow is appropriately omniscient and 



sinister as Cane, and Julie Carmen is passable 
as Styles, but it is Sam Neill's charasmatic lead 
performance and John Carpenter's absolutely 
accurate sense of what scares people that make 
the film work. Together, both in front of and 
behind the camera, these two men create a 
livid, beleivable world up there on that screen, 
and as a result the film elevates from residing in 
a mere two dimensions and transforms into 
traumatic assualt on the viewer's sensibilities, 
It has been seven years since Carpenter's last 
horror outing, a really awful piece of incoherent 
garbage known as "Prince of Darkness." Despite big 
box office, that film seemed to mark the end of his 
horror career. That assessment was incorrect. Car- 
penter is indeed back, and better than ever. If you 
plan to see this movie, be forewarned that you are 
about to be taken to the edge of the abyss - and John 
Carpenter has no qualms about walking up behind 
you and abruptly pushing you over, all the while 
smiling as you fall. See this film only if you have the 
strength of mind to deal with real terror. And be 
prepared to look for the nurse when it's over. 




John Trent (Sam Neill) enters the '.vorld of 
horror novelist Sutter Cane 



it- 
sVvs 



Of Flreaks, Fear and Financial Ruin - The Fair At A Glance. 



By D.S.ULLERY 
Entertainment Editor 

Well, the South Florida Fau- 
nas once again swept out of town 
like a thief in the night (exactly 
like a thief in the night, consider- 
ing the cost of attending) leaving 
behind a whirlwind of litter, desti- 
tute patrons, and mixed emotions. 

Every year at this time I am 
assailed by a barrage of both posi- 
tive and negative comments from 
people who were alternately im- 
pressed and depressed by this 
annual rite of passage. 

Here is my take on the Fair, or 
rather, why people continue to at- 
tend this fourteen day stew of hec- 
tic social gatherings. That's all it 
is, you know. Hundreds of social 
cliques getting together to devour 
food that was probably a sideshow 
displaymerehours ago.They place 



themselves in poorly constructed 
chambers connected to large, re- 
volving mechanisms that have the 
appearance of being designed for 
use on the next thrilling episode of 
"Super Dave's Las Vegas Spectacu- 
lar." 

People attend the Fair because 
it's a social tiling. For some, It's a 
chance to hang out with friends. 
For others, it's an opportunity to 
simply let loose and party, and for 
more than a few it's a chance to go 
somewhere different and see some- 
thing new. Maybe even make a few 
friends in the process. 

When stripped of its gigantic, 
death defying rides or the cultural 
anomalies that are referred to as 
"exhibits," the Fair stflr exudes a 
certain charm. It's overcrowded, 



sweaty, dangerous attimes-I chal- 
lenge anyone to accidentally play 
disco music while walking past the 
Beer Garden - and quite often a rip 
off. The Freak Show is a lame pa- 
rade of statues and black and white 
photographs of people that no one 
even cared aboutbackin theTwen- 
ties, when the pictures were taken. 
It is also very expensive. Enter 
expecting to spend twenty dollars, 
and exit having spent one hun- 
dred arid twenty dollars. That 
should be emblazoned in gigantic 
red letters on a banner spanning 
the width of every entrance at the 

But we don't care, hi the end, 
most people have less of a problem 
spending their money at the Fair 
than Disneyworld, and that's be- 



cause it's only here for two weeks 
It's annual. We don'thave to spend 
every day of the year havttig the 
thing stuffed into every sensory 
orifice the human body is designed 
with. 

So once ayear, theeollectivej souls 
of this great country gather" to pay 
tribute to shameless corarnercjfcaiisin 
and the blatant threat to life a*$<X ito* 
that now plays an important PSit* 
our lives. Where else canyou scream 
in fear of a horrible death a *M ^ 
have bullets whizztagpastyow bais? 
Nowhere! That's why the Fair feat' such 
a wonderful tradition. ffytKit^Wkft" 
merely being sarcastic, I feel I ifnust 
teUyouthatlwentto the fair this jyear, 

with my girlfriend in tow, no less. A«d 
guess what? I can't wait uflttJ :n<^ 
year. ' :.■■•■ 



I 



f 



I 



I! 



! 



' / 






i / 



the Beachcomber 



On O J Simpson- Truth, Justice or Just the American Way 



By Robert Wimberly 
Staff Reporter 

It came in a box labelled "The 
Pursuit", by someone named 
Hamilton, for some unimaginable 
"security reason". Maybe so that 
the boxes wouldn't accidentally 
drop open in the prescence of 
sticky-fingered package handlers. 
Or maybe in the fear that some 
newly spawned terrorist organiza- 
tion would be waiting to inject them 
with explosives and send copies to 
the Ayatollah. At any rate they 
came, and the growing pile of books 
asserting both OJ Simpson's guilt 
and Innocence grew by one more. 
This time by the man himself: "I 
Want To Tell You" the cover 
screamed. He will tell us for $17.95. 
Freedom of speech, but not free- 
dom of charge, that's the American 
Way. He will tell us anyway, be- 
cause the prosecution will make 
him tell us, but he won't get royal- 
ties for that. 

And by the first day, almost all 
of the copies had been sold. Gone. 
That is really what is making 
the OJ Simpson trial a national 
phenomenon; not the nature of 
the thing, but the fact that people 
are actually getting up away from 
the TV set and going to buy a book. 
Maybe we should dress some guy 
up like Charles Dickens or 
Nathaniel Hawthorne and take pic- 
tures of him beating the hell out of 
someone. 

Not that this sudden literary 
twinge is without drawbacks. The 
effect it has on beleaguered book- 
store clerks, for example, who have 



to listen to the same hokey speech 
about 'Innocent Until Proven 
Guilty,' the same airtight defenses 
concocted from the legal expertise 
that can be gleaned from many 
hours watching Matlock or LA Law, 
always followed by the most earth- 
shaking question yet produced by 
the entire trial: "Is it discounted?" 

Other more subtle side effects 
include the sad fact that "Hey baby, 
what's your sign", the time hon- 
ored Cheesey Pick Up Line, is 
gradually falling by the wayside in 
favor of "So, do you think he did 
it?" Yes, let's get the girl thinking 
about a guy who kills his wife 
before we try to seduce her. 

After carefully studying all of 
the evidence presented in 
esteemable journals like the Na- 
tional Enqurirer and the Globe, 
and carefully reviewing the analy- 
ses of several respected astrolo- 
gers, it is not possible, however, to 
come to any conclusion but this 
one: of course he did it. It was all 
planned from the beginning. 

Here is what happened. A few 
years ago, some books about a 
celebrity who committed a crime 
were written, but they needed some 
kind of publicity, preferably a ce- 
lebrity endorsement. So they hired 
OJ to actually commit the crime in 
the book, under the logic that a 
public trial would be a lot cheaper 
than a big ad campaign. 
OJ agreed to this for his own rea- 
sons, namely that everyone knows 
being accused of some kind of crime 




greatly improves your chances in 
the political arena. When all of 
this is over, J will sue every single 
TV station and newspaper in the 
country for defamation of charac- 
ter, win a bazillion dollars, and use 
the money to buy his freedom. He 
will disappear for awhile, and re- 
surface as a Born -Again-Christian 
running for governor of some 
southern state on the Republican 
ticket. He will base his campaign 
on new contexts for the sprit and 
strength our Great Nation is based 
on, the usual GOP strategy. 

We are Pioneers! Always forg- 
ing ahead, looking for new lands to 
conquer, tame, and decorate with 
Mouse Ears and strip malls. This 



time, we have turned our hearts 
and eyes upon the vast, untamed 
Great Land of Absolute Tackiness, 
with a passion verging on 
desparation, as though there were 
no more Great Lands to plunder. 
He will sell t-shirts with himself 
and Bart, arm in arm, saying, "I 
didn't do it, man!" He will go on 
long marches with anti-abortion 
terrorists under the banner "There's 
Absolutely Nothing Wrong With 
Us..." He will pass out Nicole Pez 
dispensers."We will fight on the tele- 
vision," he will say at a rally. "We will 
fight in the lines at the supermar- 
ket. We will fight on morning talk 
shows, especially with each other. 
And we will never give up!" 



Rutgers University President Under Fire 



By Marco Buscaglia 
Special to the Beachcomber 
NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J._Students 
are calling for the resignation of 
Rutgers University's president af- 
ter he gave a speech in which he 
said African Americans lack the 
"genetic hereditary code" to score 
well on standardized tests. 
After hearing the words of Rutgers 
University President Francis 
Lawrence, minority students 
staged a silent protest march on 



This month is Black History take a look 

at the special section in this issue. See page 7 



the New Brunswick campus. 
Rutgers student government or- 
ganizations, African American stu- 
dent organizations and the local 
chapter of the National Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Col- 
ored People (NAACP) have called 
for Lawrence's immediate resigna- 
tion. 

Lawrence, however, says he 
didn't mean what he said. "It is an 



absolute contradiction of every- 
thing I believe, of everything I stand 
for, and of everything that I have 
done throughout my life , " Lawrence 
said the day after the speech went 
public. "I regret it. I do regret it. I 
certainly regret those comments." 
In November, Lawrence spoke to 
about 30 faculty members on vari- 
ous academic matters. During his 
three-hour speech, Lawrence said: 



"The average SAT for African Ameri- 
cans is 750. Do we set standards 
in the future so that we don't admit 
anybody with the national test? Or 
do we deal with a disadvantaged 
population that doesn't have that 
genetic hereditary background to 
have a higher advantage?" 
Lawrence's statement didn't re 

Rutgers/See page 6 



He was a good friend, a good brother, and a born skater 



"Botero/from i-rom pay* 

example of sportsmanship I have 
ever seen, but I have to say that it 
is one of the best examples of being 
a big brother. He won the bronze 
Siedal in the American Relays that 

yea On the last day of the champi- 
onships, we all got together at the 
Swards presentation. Itwasahuge 
Srty, everyone was dancing and 
eating and having a good tune. 
CuilleVrno disappeared for awMe, 
and when I found hto, he was 
Sancing with the girls from the 
Italian team. ■ ,. . , 

We were out of touch for about 
a year after that, not meeting up 
again until the '94 world champi- 
Stships in Gujan Mestra, France. 
He was happylo see me gjnjg me 
the usual big hug and calling me 
"nermano" (brother) l*f e ^g 
Hid we talked for awhile. He had 
Seen studying hard; he was one 
semester from a degree in archi- 
fSure. and was not able train as 
Such as he would have liked. He 



didn't spend as much time social- 
izing this year, instead going 
straight back to his hotel and 
spending time with his parents 
and coach to analyse what he was 
doing and how he could improve. 
He still looked out for his friends 
though, inviting me up to a couple 
of sessions. He would relax for a 
while and clean his skates, and 
everyone would be offering me as 
much advice and help as they could 
give, seeming as enthusiastic about 
my success as his. They even 
invited me to come back to Colum- 
bia to train with them this year. 

I never got the chance to go. 
Last November, Alvaro called and 
told me that Guillermo had been 
shot and killed. No one knew why. 

I can't bring myself to really 
believe it. It's so shocking, it's so 
obscene, it's so... surreal. It makes 
no sense at all. We lived in a 
different world than that, I thought. 
I keep thinking that I will still see 
him, that he will walk up and call 



me "hermano" and we will talk 
about being dead over coffee, and 
then go skate. 

But one thing I am sure of is 
this: when I think of Guillermo 
and the time we spent together, I 
know that he was one of those 
types of friends that you may only 
make once in a lifetime. 

He was a good friend, a good 
brother, and a born skater, and in his 
short life he became one of the best in 
all of it His first victory, 2 bronze 
medals in 1988 at Cassona Adda, was 
the first step down a shining path: in 
1990hewontheBello-AntioquiaWorld 
Championship, and in 1992 he was 
voted Sportsman of the Year by El 
Espectador, a national sports maga- 
zine. We have all lost something, a 
great man, a great sportsman, and a 
great deal of the decency that human- 
ity and the world must work so hard to 
preserve. But he will live forever if we 
learn from-his example. His memory 
will always be a source of encourage- 
ment and inspiration to me. 




Guillermo Botero 



! r —in 1 1111111111 i i| i nil i m iii wwim 



11,11 "ii iiiinrnrninrniiiiiMHiiiiiiTiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiHiii i n i »imiirn 



Page 6 



the BEACHCOMBER February 1 5, 1 995 



Feburary 15, 1995 



the BEACHCOMBER 



Page 7 




PANTHER BASEBALL TEAM OFF TO 
GOOD START 



Anthony Ramazo 
Sports Reporter 

The Palm Beach Community College(PBCC) 
baseball team won their home opener Tuesday 
Feb. 1 with an impressive 6-4 win over the 6th 
ranked Manatee Lancers. 

Eric Armour's RBI single in the fifth inning 
proved to be the game winner as the Panthers 
started their season off with an upset over the 
nationally ranked Lancers. 

J.C. Cleare, Mike Suarez, Rich Ozarowski, 
and Tony Morales had two hits each for the 
Panthers. Morales also threw out runners at- 
tempting to steal second base. Keith Ambrose 
started the game pitching for PBCC and lasted 
four innings. Scott Perantoni pitched a score- 
less fifth and sixth to earn the win. Garry Borge 
relieved Perantoni and pitched a hitless sev- 
enth and eighth inning. J.C. Cleare pitched out 
of a jam in the ninth for his first save. 

The victory was sweet for Panther's coach 
Craig Gero but he kept it in perspective. "It was 
a good win, but it is the first game of 50." Gero 
also commented on the poor attendance. "We 
would like to see some people out at the games. 
This is the #6 team we just beat." 

The Panther's second game of the season 
ended in a disappointing 7-6 loss to the Palm 
Beach Atlantic Sailfish. Eight walks by Panther 
pitchers led to three Sailfish runs. The walks 
combined with three errors at shortstop were 



reasons for the loss. 

A Panther bright spot was catcher, Jim 
Pepper going 2-for-2 with a home run, a double 
and three RBI's. Eric Armour arid Juan Rivera 
had two hits apiece and drove in a combined 
three runs for PBCC. 

The Panthers won both games of a double 
header vs. St. Petersburg on Saturday, Feb. 4. 
PBCC won the first game by a 7-6 count, the 
second by a score of 8-7. 

In the first game, Mike Suarez went 1-for-l 
with a run scored. Jim Pepper scored the 
winning run in the sixth on a balk. Carlos 
Tosca got the win and Garry Borge got the save 
for the Panthers. 

In the second game Tony Morales led the 
offensive attack with a 2-for-4, four RBI perfor- 
mance. Other offensive stars for the Panthers 
included Rich Ozorowski who went 4-for-4 
with a homer, and Kerry Mikulski who went 2- 
for-5 with a stolen base. Jim Pepper pitched 
into, then out of, a ninth inning jam for his first 
win. 

On Monday, the Panthers valient comeback 
from a 9-3 defecit fell short as PBCC lost to 
Brevard 9-8. First baseman Mike Suarez had 
an explosive 4-for-5, 6 RBI performance for the 
Panthers. Tim Slavik and Rich Ozorowski 
added two hits apiece for PBCC (3-2). 




Patsy Zimmerman 



Coach/from page 3 

years. She also stated that she might be interested 
in coaching softball or volleyball. As for her future 
plans in the sport of basketball, Zimmerman says 
she's "not quite sure". Whatever it is she decides to 
do, it is sure to be a success. This talented woman 
who has helped her team to the verge of a possible 
state title, has proven to have all the tools necessary 
to be a quality coach anywhere. 



"The SAT is designed to measure skills, not intelligence 



Rutgers/from page 5 

ceive much attention until late 
January, when officials for the 
American Association of Univer- 
sity Professors, which represents 
the university's 2 , 000 instructors , 
played a tape of the speech to hear 
Lawrence's opinions on faculty 
tenure. 

In 1994, Caucasian high 
school students averaged 938 on 
the SAT, while African Americans 
averaged 750. Averages for the 
ACT were similar: 21,4 for white 
students, 17.0 for black students. 

Critics of standardized tests 



say that the difference in score 
averages can be attributed "to pov- 
erty levels, communities, schools 
and the Individual curriculum of 
each student. 

"The SAT is designed to mea- 
sure skills, not Intelligence," said 
Jan Gams, a spokesperson for the 
College Board, which administers 
the SAT. "Students' skills are usu- 
ally determined by the preparation 
they've been given." 

Lawrence later said that he was 
trying to say that "standardized 
tests should not be used to ex- 
clude disadvantaged students on 
the trumped-up grounds that such 



tests measure inherent ability, 
because I believe they do not." But 
for some minority students, it was 
too late for explanations, 

"People say things like this and 
then later on they say they didn't 
mean it," said Cassandra Novel, a 
junior at Rutgers, where nearly 10 
percent of university's 47,000 stu- 
dents are African American. "You 
would think the president of the 
university would be someone smart 
enough to watch what he says. But 
what if he's just saying what he 
thinks? That's the scary part." 

The NAACP's demand for 
Lawrence's resignation stated: "The 



African American community has 
grown tired of being insulted and 
assaulted, given halfhearted 
apologies and then expected to 
act as if all is forgiven. Forgive- 
ness is no longer an option. Jus- 
tice is." 

Mew Jersey Gov, Christine 
Whitman was puzzled by 
Lawrence's remarks as well. 

"I knowpeoplemake stupid state- 
ments, Lord knows I have myself," 
she told reporters after hearing about 
the incident. "These remarks are so 
troubling, though. That kind of as- 
persion about genetic inferiority has 
no place In our society." 



"Gold medals and trips around the world will come and go, but your 
education will last you your whole lifetime." 



Blandon/from Front Page 

in physical education, and then 
move on to become a physical edu- 
cation teacher. Among the various 
messages that Blandon wishes to 
pass on to youngsters is that win- 
ning isn't everything. He has come 
to realize that fact within his own 
career as an in-line skater. Al- 
though he has enjoyed great suc- 
cess, Blandon realizes that the 
most important thing is to do your 
best and to have fun. 

Blandon says that what he 
enjoys most about being an in-line 
skater is that he gets a chance to 
meet lots of different people all 
over the world. He says that what 
he most dislikes is the fact that in- 
line skating takes up a lot of his 
time and he is therefore not able to 
do many of the things he would 
like to do, financially as well as 
academically. 

As far as finances go, Blandon 
does not have the time to have a 
job and therefore must rely on his 
sponsors for financial support. 



Check out Dilbert in this issue. 

Seepages 



Bont Skates and Kryptonic Wheels. 
Blandon has expressed great ap- 
preciation towards those sponsors 
because they are what has kept 
him going in his sport. 

On an academic level, Blandon 
has suffered greatly because of his 
skating career. Due to the fact that 
he has not had much experience 
with the English language, 
Blandon has struggled through 
English classes more than once, 
not making the grades he would 
like to be making. Due to the many 
hours he has had to put in train- 
ing, Blandon has not had the time 
to take more than two or three 
classes at a time. As a result, it has 
taken him four years to get his 
two-year degree, Although Blandon 
has made sacrifices with his aca- 
demic career, he whole-heartedly 
believes that a good education is 
the most important thing that any- 
one can attain. Blandon explained, 
"Gold medals and tries around the 
world will come anfjl ; gp, but your 

oH„/><5tiAn iirill lootimn vrviir whnlp 



'SaWftago's training is very im- 
portant to him, as anyone can see. 
Not only because he has made 
financial and academic sacrifices 
in order to train, but also because 
he has chosen to train with some 
very talented skaters. Coached by 
Ed Mueller at the Palace Skating 
Rink, Blandon trains with Olym- 
pic hopeful Chad Burdzilauskas,- 
1 995 World Team member Michelle 
Pa Logola, Jean Hoy who is ranked 
number three in the nation, and 
Leo Campinelli who is one of the 
top five in the United States among 
junior competitors. 

Santiago's goals are to win a 
medal at the Pan Am Games this 
March in Argentina, make the fi- 
nals at the Internationals, com- 
pete in the World Championships 
in Australia, and go to the World 
Campionships next year in Rome. 
Unfortunately, he does have one 
major obstacle in achieving these 
goals. He does not have the finan- 
cial resources of most other pro- 
fessional in-line skaters, and as a 



to come up with the finances for air 
fare to these great events. If he 
does not receive financial assis- 
tance in this area, his goals may 
never be realized. However, if he 
does receive assistance, the sky Is 
the limit for this amazing athlete. 

Blandon's ultimate goal is to 
compete in the 1998 Winter Olym- 
pics in the Ice Speed Skating com- 
petition. He wishes to pursue 
this goal because there is not an 
event in the Olympics yet for in- 
line speed skating. Even though 
he is making the switch from 
wheels to blades he feels quite 
confident in his ability to per- 
form well in the Olympics. "If you 
try hard enough and believe with 
all your heart that you can achieve 
something, you will." 

Blandon would like to thank 
the following people for their role 
in helping him to get to where he 
is today: Peggy Adams, the staff 
at the CPI lab, as well all of the 
English teachers that have as- 



f 



Black IF ST0R Y 



One Family's Quest for Freedom... Ellen and William Craft's 
Remarkable Journey 



Special to the Beachcomber 

Ellen Craft was noted as a "master of dis- 
guise". Because of her nearly white complex- 
ion, she was able to "pass" as white and with the 
help of her husband , ingeniously escaped from 
slavery. She posed as a respectable white 
gentleman and her husband as a slave. This 
was the master plan of Ellen Craft. 

Ellen was born in Clinton, Georgia. Her 
mother was a slave, who was raped by her slave 
master. Ellen was often mistakenly taken for a 
member of the family. This annoyed the mis- 
tress of the house, so when Ellen reached the 
age of 1 1 , she was taken from her mother and 
given to the master's daughter as a "wedding 
present". Although Ellen was a favorite slave 
and the conditions of her slavery were mild, the 
experience of being taken from her mother was 
traumatic. Ellen knew she would never see her 
mother again. She also knew that she didn't 
want to be a slave for the rest of her life. 

In 1848 Ellen married William Craft. He too 
was a slave. However, William was a dark, black 
man. He was a skilled cabinet maker. He had 
been allowed to earn money for his skill. Will- 
iam carefully saved every penny for he knew 
Ellen had a plan to escape. They both had 
secured Christmas holiday passes, whicJMna.de 
it possible for them to start their journey with- 
out arousing suspicion. That night they stayed 
up, going over all the details. Ellen knew that 
Slav! holders had the prMlage of taking their 
slaves to any part of the country, and she could 



Take a Trek on the Wildside in this issue. 



Set 



m 

5 



pass for a white plantation owner. She distin- 
guished herself as a gentleman. Knowing she 
spent a great deal of time in the company of 
men, she wore a pair of green spectacles to 
disguise her eyes. She could not read or write 
so she put her right arm in a sling, making it 
impossible for her to be expected to sign hotel 
registers. William would be her slave. Appear- 
ing as an invalid would justify her total 
dependancy upon her faithful "servant". A 
heavy poultice tied around her face would make 
it appear understandable for her not to engage 
in conversation, and speak onlytwhen abso- 
lutely necessary) in a soft tone. 

Ellen and William knew this would be their 
ticket to freedom. Ellen sat still. William cut her 
hair, they then knelt in prayer. The next morn- 
ing they were up before day break. Elien 
dressed complete with her top hat, green spec- 
tacles and sling. Her husband observed that 
she made a "most respectable looking gentle- 
man" Upon arriving at the train station. Ellen 
Craft alias William Johnson, slave owner, 
bought a ticket to Savannah for herself and her 
supposed slave. 

The couple's trip north was set with man> 
difficulties. When thev reached Baltimore, tney 
were relieved that the first leg of their journey 
was completed. Baltimore was the last sm 
citv on their route. However, in Baltimore Ellen 
was asked by the ticket agent to provide _prooj 
of ownership for her slave. Ellen sheart. stoppt- 



for a minute. AJt'-r all th,s h.t" 1 1 <* 
seconds from freed' nt :Ln •* <t<. 
William looked at E1W; Srt" *: *"» '* 
something. Then a tuk-? wr' * 
she was an invald .*nd -*'",:' !, *- « ,"' 
conductor to "let '.his <'"!.:>r;,r, 
pass". 

The Crafts i:\ed r: h ~* u ' ■ 
until slave hur/er*. *r j( V-i i ' : «"* : 
They fled to No\a is on i -tul trt-t 
where they received Jh** I'^Ip * ^~* 
tionists. 

In 1860. the -tnrv r iii^.i *■ -rl\ < i" 
was published in Ij >t .i * -■ < 
learned to read ditrt w ^ 






founded b> l-.il> % * *'" ^* 1 

r.ntt-d ErUlN", p. 
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tul prrrruv-r " . 
through th 1 :: - ' 
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Theihemeiiithisissue'scrosswordisZbigniew 
Brzezimski Seepage 8 

An American to Remember... 
Nanny Helen Burroughs "We 
Specialize in the Wholly Possible 



BLACK HISTORY TRIVIA Ql IZ 



Special to the Beachcomber 
P Over the years African Ameri 

can men have been ooked on as 
great men, which they are. P. 
Iver we tend tc .overtook . Mncan 

^^AnScan women have 
^e^he^affoJusasapeopleto 

grow stronger ughs was 

^^^ of the National Trade 

^^fs NaWe was the eldest 

and S5 horn to John and Jennie 
daughter bom to u . n 

B-rroughson May ^ d 

Orange, Virginia^ Nannie's 

whenshewasve^young- 
rnotherwantedherctma hs 

ahig 5 er f^rftowfsWonD.C. 

t0 £ khe NaSue studied business 
where Nannie = Nannie 

and domestic science 

^rferbe^ra-omplished 
She later became ^ g d 

vnto* ^i^ t of the Women's 
£ e " d 3to National Baptist 



as 



Auxiliary of the - d to 

Convention. f^* CCt bu t was 
teach domestic scien^ ^ 

denied a teaching pos ct 

board of Educahon in m 
of Columbia. This a ^ QVm 
^ol w^would give all sorts 



of girls a fair chan^' . m&s 

S ln the e arl Y joshed the 
Burroughs estau wWch 

Women's ^ d t ^todging to black 
offered short-term lodgi^g^ dQ _ 

wom en £* te g^S« starte d to 
mestic skills. Later ^ cents a 
hold evening classy majorin g 
week, for ^^g the depres- 
iti business. During 



sion miss Burroughs established 
and managed a self-help venture 
called Cooperative Industrial, int.. 
which provided free facilities tor a 
medical clinic, a hairdressmg sa- 
lon and a variety store. 

Seven vears later, with hejp 
from the National Baptist Conven- 
tion she began coord mating busid- 
nTplans for the National Irade 
and Professional School for Women 
and Girls which was located m 
wWon. D.C. By 1909 ihc 
school doors opened with tie, as 
the president. Miss Burroughs 
SottS was. "We specie .in the 

whollv possible." Her students 

wage earners as well as, expert 
homemakers". 

The National Trade and Pro- 
fessional School also maintained a 
dole connection between educa- 
rtonandrellftion. Us creed, stressed 
bv rotes Burroughs, consisted ui 
Sp three B's - The bible, the bath. 
£e Soonr. Clean life. Clean body 
riP-m house." The Black History 
Sim at the National Trade 

which every student was required 
tn take a course ot. . . 

JL Nannie Burroughs ^ ot a 
stroke to 1961. However, her hopt 
£ on in 1964. her school »a* 
rented the Nannie Burroughs 
SSdUi recognition of her courage 
SUonTtees^usiiig education 
£ b 2k women gainst the conwn- 
susof society- In 1975 mayor »*w 
^W^gtonprcx^l^ 
to be Nannie Helen Burrouyts, lm, 
£e Dishict of Columbia. 



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Page8 



the BEACHCOMBER February 15, 1995 




vvv 



the Beachcomber 



S TRANCE 




TlTeirnROSSWORDTr'ZBIGEW BRZEZINSKI' 



1 Like St. Paul's 

Cathedral 
6 Moistened clay 
10 Pianist Waller 
14 Win — nose 

17 University of 
Maine site 

18 Ancient 
Peruvian 

19 "...who lived in 



21 Massages 
23 Speaker ol the 
quote: 2 wds. 

26 — vera 

27 71 Across: Latin 

28 Stingy lellow? 

29 Comments 

30 Makes 
mountain music 

32 Capacitated 
35 Food fowl 



36 Telekinesis kin 
(abbr.) 

37 Fiction, lor short 

38 Prepares hair 

39 Less t 



appearing 

40 Earth goddess 

41 Sugar: suffix 

42 Start of the 
quote: 4 wds. 

46 Wandering 
49 -Fitzgerald 
50 Big happenings 
51"- Lap' 

52 Bauhaus 
painter 

53 Gave a hoot 
55 Lethargize 

59 Singer Stewart 

60 Ovine cries 

61 Disney's "Little 
Mermaid" 

62 Like some 
haircuts 



64 In a furious 
manner 

66 Alumni, for 
short 

67 Assuage 

68 Whip into a 
frenzy 

69 Author Jong 

70 Gradually 
decrease 

71 Except 

72 Take a breather 

73 Snake in the 
grass 

74 Aga or Chaka 

75 Painter Magritte 

76 Pass by 

79 Wallet stuffers 

80 Swiss, 
mathematician 

81 Middle ol the 
quote: 3 wds. 

87 — • Locka, Fla. 

88 "God's Little -" 



89 -Woodard 

90 The lowest 
classes 

94 The P of "wpm" 

95 Little louse 

96 Contemptuous 
expression 

97 Shoe layer 

98 Psyche up 
100 Lynn - 
101 --relief 

102 Surreptitious 

103 Mineo, etal. 

104 End of the 
quote: 4 wds. 

109 Light sub- 
marine gun 

110 Pick up the tab 

111 Slippery 

112 Feudal subject 

113 Author LeShan 

114 Greek cheese 

115 Health resorts 

116 Church official 



Wii Mimmimim * 

"Damn it, Jiml I'm a doctor, not a magicianl" — 



Sbaik mmf labiae, Jr. 
— Dr. "Bones" McCoy 



N$t§ 



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C*ph 

f9U. 



st*t» * shufth 

VULCAN BUTT!! 
^5==^^ Spoek 



^^^^^PWWI^S 


'» KhkT****) 7/&fiX: 


** 9rumpy / / HmM$X$: 

and // JpiWiiW 


*ONY //^P^^H 



1 Uses a divining 
rod 

2 The East 

3 Follows Sunday 

4 Dash lengths 
5 1 lid? 

6 Got in a queue 

7 Not quite never 

8 German cry 

9 Hawaiian 
volcano: 2 wds. 

10 Workshop 

11 Drained ol color 

12 The thing here 

13 Coin of Peru 

14 Pitt of "Legends 
of the Fall" 

15 December 
blazer: 2 wds. 

16 Revoke 
20 Blissful 

22 Trio of duos 

24 Corpulent 

25 Was in a rodeo 



31 Museum 
offering: 2 wds. 

33 Make dim 

34 Impose a tax 

35 Television 
add-on 

36 Made things 
simpler 

39 Denver and 
Ernie 

40 Speaker of the 
House's prop 

43 Pass along 

44 Start ol a toast 

45 Ending for 
"character" 

46 More energetic 

47 Courtney— ■ 
Smith 

48 Electronic 
devices 

52 Leaiy vegetable 

53 Liberty Bell 
feature 

54 Verdi heroine 
56 Actress Sanford 



57 Fix a piano 
again 

58 Former New 
Hampshire 
capital 

60 Petition 

61 Solo 
62-bator 

63 A Bobbsey twin 

65 Idaho product 

66 Emerald 

67 "- porridge 
hot..." 

69 Come afterward 

70 At what place? 

73 Have on 

74 Religious leader 
Nathan Homer 

75 Hierarchy levels 

77 Bank 
transactions 

78 Like the Sphinx 

79 Rap-sheet 
listing 

80 "Zounds!" 

81 Come — 



(happen) 

82 Effectuate 

83 Released 
conditionally 

84 Rummy variety 

85 -Verdugo 

86 Kind of coffee 
or stew 

91 Prepared salad 

92 Claim without 
proof 

93 Yellowstone 
sight 

96 Enjoy a sauna 

97 Thanksgiving 
Day parade 
host 

99 Annapolis inst. 

100 Captain Hook's 
sidekick 

101 Banjoist Fleck 

105 Kennel sound 

106 Marching word 

107 Corrida cheer 

1 08 Castor - 



©Anthony Bublno Jr , 1 993 » Distributed by Trlbun* fctodta S»nrtce* ■-■/^'!^^/^/•v^•^''■^■' 




DILBERT® by Scott Adams 



I HAVE AN ETHICAL 
QUE5TION ABOUT 
TELECOMPUTING , 
DOGBEKT 




4 



DO I OWE MY EMPLOYER 
EIGHT PRODUCTIVE HOOKS, 
OR DO I ONLY NEED TO 
ttATCH THE TWO PRODUC- 
TIVE HOURS I WOULD 
HAVE IN THE. OFFICE? 




WELL, WHEN YOU FACTOR IN 
HOW YOU'RE HAVING THE 
PLANET BY NOT DRIVING, 
YOU ONLY OWE ONE HOUR. 

AND THIS 

MEETING 

COUNT5. 




Are You Alone This Valentines? 
Call the Data-Line Today! 

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